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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Melissa Goertzen and Nisa Bakkalbasi

In two previous papers, the authors discussed a text analysis method utilized to explore e-book usage across disciplines at Columbia University. To verify the method, the authors…

Abstract

Purpose

In two previous papers, the authors discussed a text analysis method utilized to explore e-book usage across disciplines at Columbia University. To verify the method, the authors conducted focus group and interviews sessions with faculty members and graduate students to understand when and why e-books are used in conjunction with scholarly activities. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants answered eight pre-determined questions during one-on-one interviews and dual moderator focus group sessions. They were also invited to complete a questionnaire regarding e-book discovery, access, and use. All sessions were transcribed and the data were analyzed using grounded theory approach to examine emerging themes.

Findings

The findings suggest that faculty and graduate students use e-books for discontinuous reading and quick reference purposes. They value the ability to customize learning environments to suit immediate circumstances and needs. Frustration occurs when availability and accessibility are hindered by limitations imposed by platforms or licenses. Participants believe the library can advocate for users and work with vendors to develop business models that promote greater convenience and flexibility online.

Originality/value

The study complements and extends existing findings reported in earlier research utilizing a text analysis method. The results indicate that text analysis is a reliable assessment method in the examination of usage trends across e-book collections. Also, the study brings a human sentiment to the discussion of e-book discovery, access, and use. It provides the user community with a voice and left the authors with a deeper understanding of existing information needs on campus.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Nisa Bakkalbasi and Melissa Goertzen

Over the past decade, as the electronic book (e-book) collection continues to grow, Columbia University Libraries has been gathering information to develop policies related to…

Abstract

Purpose

Over the past decade, as the electronic book (e-book) collection continues to grow, Columbia University Libraries has been gathering information to develop policies related to e-book acquisition, discovery, and access. The purpose of this paper is to investigate users’ e-book search behavior and information needs across different disciplines.

Design/methodology/approach

The research method utilizes text data from two sources: users’ e-book search queries that were entered into the libraries discovery tool called CLIO and e-book title words provided by the Counting Online Usage of Networked Electronic Resources (COUNTER) usage reports. The analysis involves identifying and quantifying certain words from users’ search queries with the purpose of examining the contexts within which these words were used.

Findings

The prominence of topical words such as “history,” “social,” and “politics” in the list was an interesting reflection on the kinds of works users were looking for, as were the terms “handbook,” “guide,” and “manual.” The high frequency of these words imply that users were searching for broad topics, reference works, or other collections of instructions, all of which are intended to provide ready reference.

Originality/value

Running search queries and e-book title words through a text analysis tool revealed new ideas related to what types of materials users search for and use. Text analysis of search terms and title words provided insight into the nature of e-book use, including broad topic (e.g. history), academic level of use (e.g. introductory), and genre/type (e.g. reference). While it is challenging to deduce reader intent from word frequency analysis, as text data remain widely open for interpretation, the methodology has significant strengths that drive us to continue to use in future studies.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Joan Stein

250

Abstract

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Joan Stein

216

Abstract

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Ann E Williams and Melissa A. Woodacre

The purpose of this paper is twofold: the first aim is theoretical – to review extant literature on academic social networks, while considering current limitations and potential…

1797

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: the first aim is theoretical – to review extant literature on academic social networks, while considering current limitations and potential avenues for future research; the second objective is practical – to introduce an illustrative comparison guide that researchers can use to identify and distinguish between the functionalities of popular academic social networking sites (ASNSs), including Academia.edu, Mendeley.com, ResearchGate.net, Zotero.org, and Google Scholar.

Design/methodology/approach

The review of research is descriptive and conceptual.

Findings

The overarching outcomes of the review suggest that research on academic social networks falls into two primary arenas – promises (i.e. potential benefits to the academic community) and perils (i.e. reservations expressed by scholars). The authors recommend that a greater focus on the unique characteristics and utilities of specific sites and a more robust understanding of scholars’ use preferences and practices is warranted in future and ongoing research.

Originality/value

This is the first review of ASNSs to provide comparative descriptions for scholars to utilize when making decisions about adoption, use, and research.

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 July 2022

Daniel M. Jenkins and Melissa L. Rocco

Program reviews are standard practice in higher education. Yet, due to the infancy of the leadership discipline, little is known about the process of conducting reviews of…

Abstract

Program reviews are standard practice in higher education. Yet, due to the infancy of the leadership discipline, little is known about the process of conducting reviews of leadership programs. Through interviewing 13 experienced leadership program reviewers in both curricular and co-curricular contexts, the authors of this study aim to address this gap in the literature. A comparative case study was employed to learn more about what encompasses a leadership program review and elicit experience-based practices for facilitating leadership program reviews in higher education. A thematic analysis of the interview transcripts was conducted by the researchers and the four major themes of review logistics, reviewer experiences, review outcomes, and lessons learned are shared in this study. The researchers found contextual factors related to the institutions and leadership programs, reviewer facilitation skills, setting clear expectations of the review process and outcomes, identifying resources, and nuances related to power considerations and political dynamics to be primary factors in conducting leadership program reviews. The authors close by offering implications for research and practice based on these findings.

Details

Journal of Leadership Education, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1552-9045

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