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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 18 October 2021

Michelle Spirtos, Mary Naughton, Emma Carr, Tadhg Stapleton and Michelle O'Donnell

The post-operative management of flexor tendon injuries has been the focus of considerable exploration and there continues to be variation in approaches and methods of…

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Abstract

Purpose

The post-operative management of flexor tendon injuries has been the focus of considerable exploration and there continues to be variation in approaches and methods of mobilisation. The purpose of this paper is to explore therapy management following repair to flexor tendons at zone II and flexor pollicis longus (FPL) (all zones) in Ireland.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive survey questionnaire design through an online format was used. Therapists were recruited through the Irish Association of Hand Therapists, the national bodies for occupational therapy and physiotherapy, and therapy managers in acute hospitals, with 29 therapists participating in the study. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the survey data.

Findings

Patients were generally seen three to five days following surgery. Early active mobilisation approaches were favoured by all but one therapist, with 62% using the Belfast protocol and 34% the Manchester Short Splint (MSS) protocol. Each early active protocol exercise session commences with passive motion followed by graded active flexion. Tenodesis is incorporated by the majority of respondents within the first four weeks. Therapy programme and splints are modified based on patient presentation. Resistance exercises are commenced from week seven. Patient compliance was identified as the most influential factor in the post-operative intervention approach taken.

Originality/value

This study provides the first Irish profile of current practice in the post-operative management of flexor tendon repairs at zone II and FPL which has not previously been reported. Further research should explore the reasoning behind the interventions chosen and also the implications for practice of changes to surgical techniques.

Details

Irish Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-8819

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Marina Astakhova and Mary Hogue

– The purpose of this paper is to apply a biopsychosocial model to develop an integrated typology of heavy work investment (HWI) behaviors.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply a biopsychosocial model to develop an integrated typology of heavy work investment (HWI) behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper follows an inductive approach to theory building in which we review relevant constructs, categorize those constructs, and outline the relationships among them.

Findings

The paper provides a theoretically grounded typology of HWI that distinguishes three general types of HWI (workaholic HWI, situational HWI, and pseudo HWI) and nine corresponding HWI manifestations. It is suggested that various forms of HWI differ in nature according to the joint interplay of varying strengths of biological, psychological, and social influences. The paper also demonstrates how the typology can be applied to predict unique individual and organizational outcomes associated with each HWI sub-type.

Research limitations/implications

The paper offers a unified strong foundation for developing HWI measures. It offers a direction for future research that will examine antecedents and outcomes of the nine sub-types. It provokes the examination of the “stability” of each HWI manifestation over time by including a temporal component into the biopsychosocial framework.

Practical implications

This research will help practitioners differentiate among HWI manifestations to effectively sustain positive outcomes and proactively evade negative outcomes associated with HWI.

Originality/value

To date, various manifestations of HWI and workaholism have been discussed in the literature with little unification across studies. In this paper, the authors respond to the call for a theoretically grounded approach that will provide unifying explanations to why and how HWI manifests.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Michael E. Drew, Tony Naughton and Madhu Veeraragavan

In this article we compare the performance of the traditional CAPM with the multi factor model of Fama and French (1996) for equities listed in the Shanghai Stock Exchange. We…

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Abstract

In this article we compare the performance of the traditional CAPM with the multi factor model of Fama and French (1996) for equities listed in the Shanghai Stock Exchange. We also investigate the explanatory power of idiosyncratic volatility and respond to the claim that multi factor model findings can be explained by the turn of the year effect. Our results show that firm size, book to market equity and idiosyncratic volatility are priced risk factors in addition to the theoretically well specified market factor. As far as the turn of the year effect is concerned we reject the claim that the findings are driven by seasonal factors.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 31 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Peter E. Mudrack

Naughton proposed that workaholism may result from a combination of high job involvement with an obsessive‐compulsive personality. This study was designed specifically to…

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Abstract

Naughton proposed that workaholism may result from a combination of high job involvement with an obsessive‐compulsive personality. This study was designed specifically to elaborate upon and to explore this proposal. Both obsessive‐compulsive personality and workaholism, however, seem to be multidimensional rather than unidimensional variables, and their multidimensional nature needed clarification before the study could proceed. Obsessive‐compulsive personality consisted of six distinct traits: obstinacy, orderliness, parsimony, perseverance, rigidity, and superego. Workaholism was operationalized as having two behavioral components: tendencies both to engage in non‐required work activities, and to intrude actively on the work of others. This study predicted specifically that high job involvement coupled with high scores on the obstinacy, orderliness, rigidity, and superego traits would lead to high scores on tendencies to engage in non‐required work. These four predictions received some support in data emerging from a sample of 278 employed persons, although support was strongest for the obstinacy and superego traits. These results add to understanding of the work attitude of job involvement given its associations with some obsessive‐compulsive traits, suggest the relevance of obsessive‐compulsive personality in non‐clinical settings, and add to understanding of the phenomenon of workaholism as behavioral tendencies.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Martha A. Reavley and Thomas J. Naughton

Reports on a study which sought to test the impact of gender‐basedtraining experiences on selection decisions. Subjects evaluated thecredentials of a job candidate for a…

Abstract

Reports on a study which sought to test the impact of gender‐based training experiences on selection decisions. Subjects evaluated the credentials of a job candidate for a management position. The training experiences of the three candidates were manipulated so that a third of the applicant materials were described as relating to a female with gender‐based or “women‐only” training; another third of the materials were described as belonging to a female with gender‐neutral training; and a final third were labelled as male with gender‐neutral training. Results suggest that female candidates whose training is not gender based may be viewed more positively because their behaviours appear more consistent with the male socialization view. Discusses the implications of these findings for women in management training and for managerial selection.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 14 May 2020

Angus Nurse

Abstract

Details

The Citizen and the State
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-040-1

Book part
Publication date: 12 December 2022

Samantha Broadhead

The development of ‘desire’ in a working-class artist/academic is explored through an analysis of the reminiscences between the author and her mother. It is argued that the notion…

Abstract

The development of ‘desire’ in a working-class artist/academic is explored through an analysis of the reminiscences between the author and her mother. It is argued that the notion of cultural capital implies a deficit in working-class subjects that is deterministic and does not fully explain those who are successful in the art world and/or academia. Rather than thinking about works of art and art practice in terms of cultural capital, they are conceptualised as resources that can have existential significance for some people. This is because early interactions with the arts enable people to connect with the world and at the same time enable them to recognise their own desires and talents while learning to think critically about their lives. The findings of this study suggest a nuanced approach based on cultural assets and resources rather than cultural capital should be considered in educational policy and practice.

Details

The Lives of Working Class Academics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-058-1

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 September 2020

Joanna Golden, Mark Kohlbeck and Zabihollah Rezaee

Purpose – The purpose of this study is to investigate whether a firm’s cost structure (specifically, its cost stickiness) is associated with environmental, social, and governance…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this study is to investigate whether a firm’s cost structure (specifically, its cost stickiness) is associated with environmental, social, and governance (ESG) sustainability factors of performance and disclosure.

Methodology/approach – This study uses MCSI Research KLD Stats (KLD) and Bloomberg databases for the 13-year period from 2003 to 2015 in constructing ESG performance and disclosure variables, respectively. The authors adopt the general cost stickiness models from Anderson, Banker, and Janakiraman (2003) and Banker, Basu, Byzalov, and Chen (2016) to perform the analysis.

Findings – The authors find that a firm’s level of cost stickiness is positively associated with certain sticky corporate social responsibility (CSR)/ESG activities (both overall and when separately classified as strengths or concerns) but not with other nonsticky CSR activities. The authors also show that the association between cost stickiness and ESG disclosure is incrementally stronger for firms with CSR activities classified as sticky. Furthermore, the authors provide evidence that ESG disclosure is greater when both cost stickiness and the degree of sticky CSR activities increase. The authors show that when cost stickiness is high and CSR activities are sticky, management has incentives to increase CSR/ESG sustainability disclosure to decrease information asymmetry.

Originality/value – The findings present new evidence to understand how management integrates cost management strategies with various dimensions of sustainability performance decisions and show that not all ESG activities are equally effective when it comes to cost stickiness. The authors also demonstrate that increased sustainability disclosure helps reduce information asymmetry incrementally more when both costs are sticky and CSR activities are sticky.

Article
Publication date: 5 April 2013

Mary L.M. Gilhooly, Deborah Cairns, Miranda Davies, Priscilla Harries, Kenneth J. Gilhooly and Elizabeth Notley

The purpose of this paper is to explore the detection and prevention of elder financial abuse through the lens of a “professional bystander intervention model”. The authors were…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the detection and prevention of elder financial abuse through the lens of a “professional bystander intervention model”. The authors were interested in the decision cues that raise suspicions of financial abuse, how such abuse comes to the attention of professionals who do not have a statutory responsibility for safeguarding older adults, and the barriers to intervention.

Design/methodology/approach

In‐depth interviews were conducted using the critical incident technique. Thematic analysis was carried out on transcribed interviews. In total, 20 banking and 20 health professionals were recruited. Participants were asked to discuss real cases which they had dealt with personally.

Findings

The cases described indicated that a variety of cues were used in coming to a decision that financial abuse was very likely taking place. Common to these cases was a discrepancy between what is normal and expected and what is abnormal or unexpected. There was a marked difference in the type of abuse noticed by banking and health professionals, drawing attention to the ways in which context influences the likelihood that financial abuse will be detected. The study revealed that even if professionals suspect abuse, there are barriers which prevent them acting.

Originality/value

The originality of this study lies in its use of the bystander intervention model to study the decision‐making processes of professionals who are not explicitly charged with adult safeguarding. The study was also unique because real cases were under consideration. Hence, what the professionals actually do, rather than what they might do, was under investigation.

Abstract

Details

Coaching Winning Sales Teams
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-488-1

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