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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2022

Rebeca da Rocha Grangeiro, Manoel Bastos Gomes Neto and Catherine Esnard

The purpose of this paper is to assess the adherence to the traits of the queen bee phenomenon (QBP) for women who hold leadership positions in Brazilian higher education…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the adherence to the traits of the queen bee phenomenon (QBP) for women who hold leadership positions in Brazilian higher education institutions (HEIs) and to compare their responses with those of women without leadership positions and of men on the same dimensions.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 703 academics from 88 HEIs participated in this study. The data were analyzed using a statistical package to calculate descriptive and inferential statistics. For these, 2 × 2 analysis of variance tests were performed to compare leader women vs nonleader women and leader women vs leader men.

Findings

The results indicate that leader women do not fit to all dimensions of the QBP. They report high averages to commitment, agency traits and personal sacrifices to career (Male self-description) and to meritocratic discourse. However, leader women assess their junior counterparts with higher averages to commitment and agency traits than women without leadership positions and leader men assess their junior counterparts. Women in leadership positions report superior identification with same gender colleagues and declare to be more supportive with affirmative policies for women's professional development than nonleader women and leader men.

Practical implications

This study reinforces that same gender conflict in the work environment is not a female characteristic and also promotes reflections on the influence of organizational culture, men hostility toward quotas and gender stereotypes for female progression in the academic context.

Originality/value

This study provides an empirical analysis of the QBP to academic women in Brazilian HEIs and compares its dimensions to nonleader women and leader men. The analysis of a sexist culture enabled original results, as nondistancing of the self-group, even if leader women presented some QB traits.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 July 2022

Yousef Khader, Aida Asim Essaid, Mohammad S. Alyahya, Rowaida Al-Maaitah, Muntaha K. Gharaibeh, Abeer Bashier Dababneh and Raeda F. AbuAlRub

This study aims to identify and explore experiences, perspectives, barriers and enablers to women’s career progression to management positions in the health-care sector…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify and explore experiences, perspectives, barriers and enablers to women’s career progression to management positions in the health-care sector and to assess women’s and men’s perceptions of the policies and practices of the health-care system concerning gender equality and nondiscrimination between women and men.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey was conducted among health-care professionals in ten selected hospitals, including physicians, registered nurses/midwives and pharmacists with or without managerial positions.

Findings

This study included a total of 2,082 female and 1,100 male health-care professionals. Overall, 70% of women and men reported that opportunities for advancement are based on knowledge and skills in their institution. However, 58.9% of women (p < 0.001) reported that women are more likely to face barriers to career advancement than men do in their workplace. Lack of women in general/line management and discrimination against women by supervisors at the point of promotion were the main barriers to women's career progression, as they were reported by two-thirds of women. The main barrier, as perceived by men (62.3%) was that women have family and domestic responsibilities.

Practical implications

To overcome barriers in women's career progression, there is a need to establish a career planning and capacity-building program for women in the health sector.

Originality/value

Jordanian female health-care professionals face different barriers that affect their career progression, including inequity and discrimination in the workplace, negative views about women’s abilities, lack of qualifications and training, hostile cultural beliefs and family responsibilities.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 May 2022

Moshe Sharabi and Galit Yanay-Ventura

Women's participation in the workforce and in managerial positions, which has led to greater diversity, reconstructs professional perceptions and preferences. The purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

Women's participation in the workforce and in managerial positions, which has led to greater diversity, reconstructs professional perceptions and preferences. The purpose of this research is to examine “Work Outcome Preferences” among men and women according to organizational status and the impact of other demographic factors.

Design/methodology/approach

The Meaning of Work (MOW) questionnaire was filled by 1,161 men and women employees in organizations: 744 workers, 256 junior managers and 161 middle managers. To examine the hypotheses, authors conducted an analysis of variance (ANOVA) test and a linear regression analysis for women and men.

Findings

The gender differences regarding work outcomes preferences decreases with career promotion. Further, the higher the organizational status, the higher the need for interesting and satisfying work among both men and women. Among women, the higher the organizational status, the higher the need for status and prestige and for serving society and the lower the need for interpersonal contacts and income.

Practical implications

Better understanding of the preferred outcomes among women and men in the three organizational statuses and the impact of promotion and varied demographic variables can help in the planning of material and non-material reward systems and methods suitable to the different sub-groups.

Originality/value

As far as authors know, there is not a single study focusing on the differences between narrow career stages such as workers, junior and middle managers according to gender regarding work values/work outcome preferences.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

Peter Bluckert

Men are faced with major new challenges in both their work environments and their personal lives. As such, more and more men are looking for places to explore the…

Abstract

Men are faced with major new challenges in both their work environments and their personal lives. As such, more and more men are looking for places to explore the prominent issues in their lives. This article speaks to the experience of four Men's Groups and examines how the groups operated and what came out of them. It reflects on the process of personal change for these men and its implications for leadership development. Certain key ingredients for creating a change environment are identified: support, good listening, challenge, taking risks and making close, genuine connections with each other. It suggests that men can and do change, particularly if they make a strong commitment to their own development and learning. The importance of personal counselling and therapy work to this change process is outlined in some detail.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2007

Justin Gaffney

The recently published Home Office strategy document, A co‐ordinated prostitution strategy and a summary of responses to Paying the price (Home Office, 2006), focuses on…

Abstract

The recently published Home Office strategy document, A co‐ordinated prostitution strategy and a summary of responses to Paying the price (Home Office, 2006), focuses on the role of men in prostitution. However, this focus is centred on men being the abusers of women and children involved in the sex industry, and vilifies men as the perpetrators that drive the sex market. This article traces the implications of the strategy for men involved in prostitution.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

Paul G.W. Jansen, Mandy E.G. van der Velde and Inge A. Telting

The present longitudinal study examines the effect of 105 different human resource practices, grouped into four domains (staffing, human resource development, hygiene…

2004

Abstract

The present longitudinal study examines the effect of 105 different human resource practices, grouped into four domains (staffing, human resource development, hygiene factors, supportive climate) on trends in the increase or decrease of the number of men and women working at different hierarchical levels. In addition to the four HR domains, the effect of initial gender ratio at the start of the program was analyzed. Results show that intitial gender ratio had the largest effect on the advancement of men and women. Surprisingly, both women and men benefited from a larger female gender ratio in the highest job levels. If the effect of gender ratio is omitted, it appears that the advancement of men and women in the highest job levels is negatively affected by hygiene practices and not influenced by staffing, development or supportive practices.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1989

Michael Simmons

Programmes to create equal opportunities for women have taken placein many organisations. The ensuing need, however, to find ways to enlistmale managers as allies for such…

Abstract

Programmes to create equal opportunities for women have taken place in many organisations. The ensuing need, however, to find ways to enlist male managers as allies for such programmes, has prompted many people to begin to think about the specific training needs of men from a fresh viewpoint. The need for men to understand ways in which they are conditioned to behave is described. Such ways are both less effective and inhibiting for women colleagues. Processes used by the author in training men to recognise and overcome problems are set out.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1986

Michael Simmons

Men occupy the great majority of key leadership positions in the world; in national government, in local government, in business, in trades unions and in local…

Abstract

Men occupy the great majority of key leadership positions in the world; in national government, in local government, in business, in trades unions and in local organisations. Although women have made very considerable advances, men are still chosen in the greatest number for leadership; for example, in business, men still comprise 77 per cent of all managers and 98 per cent of top managers.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Sharon De Mascia

– Questions whether organizational well-being strategies always recognize the differences between men and women when it comes to mental health.

Abstract

Purpose

Questions whether organizational well-being strategies always recognize the differences between men and women when it comes to mental health.

Design/methodology/approach

Shows why men’s mental health is an area of concern and reveals how to ensure that an organization’s well-being strategy looks after men, as well as women.

Findings

Describes how the limited research that exists regarding the mental health of men paints a picture of men experiencing mental ill health in a different way from women. This makes it less likely that it will be identified, recognized or addressed using the current “female model” of mental health.

Research limitations/implications

Advises organizations to: train their managers to recognize the different symptoms of reduced mental health that men present with, so that they can identify when male staff are experiencing mental ill health; raise awareness of the fact that men experience mental ill health and that it is alright to talk about feelings; and remember that men may be very reluctant to talk to someone in the workplace about how they feel and may not want to talk to their doctor for the same reasons.

Practical implications

Advises organizations to: train their managers to recognize the different symptoms of reduced mental health that men present with, so that they can identify when male staff are experiencing mental ill health; raise awareness of the fact that men experience mental ill health and that it is alright to talk about feelings; and remember that men may be very reluctant to talk to someone in the workplace about how they feel and may not want to talk to their doctor for the same reasons.

Social implications

Considers that there has been a wealth of research into the mental health of women but still relatively little into the mental health of men.

Originality/value

Provides a set of practical recommendations for organizations to ensure that they are taking account of the mental health of their male employees.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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