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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Poornima Madan and Shalini Srivastava

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between mentoring, managerial effectiveness and demographic variables. Being in a mentoring relationship offers a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between mentoring, managerial effectiveness and demographic variables. Being in a mentoring relationship offers a low-cost experiential learning, encourages diversity and inclusion, helps in expanding professional associations and boosts engagement. The use of mentoring programs can achieve this to a larger extent by making managers effective.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was administered on 350 middle-level managers, representatives of five private sector banks in Delhi/NCR. Variables in the study were assessed using validated instruments. Descriptive statistics, t-test, correlation and hierarchical regression were used for data analysis.

Findings

The study depicts that mentoring has a positive and significant impact on managerial effectiveness. The research contributed in establishing that the demographic variables (gender and marital status) positively moderate the relationship between mentoring and managerial effectiveness.

Research limitations/implications

Although the knowledge base and skillfulness of the young mangers are taken care by the way of organizational training, mentoring relationships complement it with added focus on personal directions to deal with minutiae of organizational processes. Mentors provide a critical linkage to an organization’s competitive advantage by helping expanding connections and networks of employees, and thereby, enhancing productivity which directly affects profitability. Managers and policymakers should chart out the mentoring plans, keeping in perspective the demographic variables, specially the gender of the mentee and the marital status.

Originality/value

This is a pioneer study contributing to the present reserve of knowledge and understanding of the subject by contextualizing the impact of demographic variables on mentoring and managerial effectiveness in Indian private sector banks.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Umesh Kumar Bamel, Santosh Rangnekar, Peter Stokes and Renu Rastogi

The purpose of this paper is to conduct an investigation into the interaction of three factors: ownership (public and private sector organizations), gender (male and…

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1166

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conduct an investigation into the interaction of three factors: ownership (public and private sector organizations), gender (male and female), and level of manager (senior, middle, junior) in relation to the concept of effectiveness in the Indian context.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a data set of primary responses from 200 Indian executives. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis was employed to retrieve and validate the instrument. Finally, 2×2×3 factorial ANOVA (GLM) was performed.

Findings

First, the study proposes a valid and reliable measure of managerial effectiveness. Second, the interaction pattern of predictor variables in relation to managerial effectiveness provides further insights.

Practical implications

Through its empirical evidence the study offers insight into issues of managerial effectiveness and provides suggestions for managerial action.

Originality/value

The study attempted to gather the views of executives regarding issues of productivity, adaptability and flexibility as constructs of managerial effectiveness. Last, comparative analysis of different categories of managers (based on gender, organizational position, and institutional ownership status) provide an understanding of these issues in the Indian context.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2013

Umesh Kumar Bamel, Santosh Rangnekar, Peter Stokes and Renu Rastogi

Research on organizational climate has shown a significant upward trend in the recent past. The purpose of the present study is to propose a conceptual model that…

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1859

Abstract

Purpose

Research on organizational climate has shown a significant upward trend in the recent past. The purpose of the present study is to propose a conceptual model that empirically examines the relationship of dimensions of organizational climate with managerial effectiveness in Indian organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

A data set of 245 managers/executives was collected from Indian organizations through a survey instrument. The collected responses were subsequently tested by using structural equation modeling (SEM). Further, the hypothesized model was tested by employing five stages of hierarchical multiple regressions.

Findings

The findings suggest that organizational climate dimensions, i.e. organizational process, altruistic behaviour, role clarity and communication, results‐rewards orientation and certain aspects of interpersonal relationships play a significant role in increasing managerial effectiveness.

Research limitations/implications

The results indicate ways in which organizations might develop supportive climates in order to reinforce effectiveness of the organizational members.

Originality/value

The role of organizational climate in employee effectiveness is currently under‐researched in the Indian context. The present study is an earnest effort in this direction to analyse the link between organizational climate and managerial effectiveness.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Sarfaraz Javed, Azam Malik and Mutaz Minwer Hala Alharbi

Managerial effectiveness is considered as an essential element for sustainable development and competitive advantage for organisations, and its core conceptualisation…

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2130

Abstract

Purpose

Managerial effectiveness is considered as an essential element for sustainable development and competitive advantage for organisations, and its core conceptualisation revolves around the capability of management to manage self, subordinates and relationships. However, very few research addressed this important phenomenon; this study aims to fill this gap by investigating the mediating role of Islamic work ethics between leadership styles and managerial effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection was done through a structured questionnaire, and the hypothesized relationships were tested with the help of SmartPLS.

Findings

Results of the statistical analysis showed that transformational and transactional leadership styles are positively associated with managerial effectiveness. Also, Islamic work ethics mediated the association between transactional leadership and managerial effectiveness, and however, no mediation effect of Islamic work ethics was found in the relationship of transformational leadership and managerial effectiveness

Originality/value

Although volumes of research have been conducted into the nature of management and leadership over the past 50 years or so, there have been significant shortcomings in terms of little attention having been given to the issue of managerial effectiveness, lack of generalizability of findings and lack of relevance and utility; thus, this study contributed to human resource management literature by providing a macro-level model to measure managerial effectiveness.

Details

PSU Research Review, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2399-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Frank Shipper, Joel Kincaid, Denise M. Rotondo and Richard C. Hoffman

Multinationals increasingly require a cadre of skilled managers to effectively run their global operations. This exploratory study examines the relationship between…

Abstract

Multinationals increasingly require a cadre of skilled managers to effectively run their global operations. This exploratory study examines the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and managerial effectiveness among three cultures. EI is conceptualized and measured as self‐other agreement concerning the use of managerial skills using data gathered under a 360‐degree feedback process. Three hypotheses relating to managerial self‐awareness of both interactive and controlling skills are examined using data from 3,785 managers of a multinational firm located in the United States (US), United Kingdom (UK), and Malaysia. The two sets of managerial skills examined were found to be stable across the three national samples. The hypotheses were tested using polynomial regressions, and contour plots were developed to aid interpretation. Support was found for positive relationships between effectiveness and EI (self‐awareness). This relationship was supported for interactive skills in the US and UK samples and for controlling skills in the Malaysian and UK samples. Self‐awareness of different managerial skills varied by culture. It appears that in low power distance (PD) cultures such as the United States and United Kingdom, self‐awareness of interactive skills may be crucial relative to effectiveness whereas in high PD cultures, such as Malaysia self‐awareness of controlling skills may be crucial relative to effectiveness. These findings are discussed along with the implications for future research.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Scott Tonidandel, Phillip W. Braddy and John W. Fleenor

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relative importance of four managerial skill dimensions (technical skill, administrative skill, human skill, and citizenship…

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7448

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relative importance of four managerial skill dimensions (technical skill, administrative skill, human skill, and citizenship behavior) for predicting managerial effectiveness. In addition, it aims to explore whether the relative importance of these skill dimensions varies as a function of gender or organizational level.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were 733 managers enrolled in a nationally recognized leadership development program. Ratings of managerial skill were obtained from peers using a well‐validated 360‐degree assessment instrument, while manager effectiveness ratings were provided by supervisors. Moderated multiple regression and relative weight analysis were used to test the study's hypotheses.

Findings

Using ratings provided by multiple sources, these results show that all four of the managerial skill dimensions were significantly important predictors of manager effectiveness. Human skills were significantly more important than technical skill and citizenship behavior, while administrative skills were most important overall. Gender was not a significant moderator of the skill‐effectiveness relationship, but organizational level was.

Practical implications

Individuals tasked with selecting, developing, or placing managers should take all four skill dimensions into account. Moreover, special consideration should be given to administrative skill, and this emphasis should increase for managers higher up in the organizational hierarchy.

Originality/value

Although prior research has speculated about the importance of different managerial skills, this study is the first to provide empirical support for this skill typology in predicting actual managerial effectiveness using appropriate statistical analyses for examining the relative importance of these skill dimensions.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 October 2020

Johanna Anzengruber, Sabine Bergner, Herbert Nold and Daniel Bumblauskas

This study examines whether managerial capability fit between line managers, middle managers and top-level managers enhances effectiveness.

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines whether managerial capability fit between line managers, middle managers and top-level managers enhances effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

Effectiveness data and managerial capability ratings from more than 1,600 manager–supervisor dyads were collected in the United States and Germany. Polynomial regression was used to study the relation between manager–supervisor fit and managerial effectiveness.

Findings

Our results indicate that the fit of managerial capabilities between a manager and his/her supervisor predicts the effectiveness of this manager. The most effective managers show particularly high managerial capabilities that are in line with predominantly high managerial capabilities of their supervisors. Two aspects are important: the manager–supervisor fit and the absolute capability level that both possess. The results further indicate that the importance of the manager–supervisor fit varies across lower, middle and top-level management dyads.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes by advancing research on managerial capability fit conditions between managers and their supervisors as a central element in viewing and managing effectiveness.

Practical implications

This article informs managers, supervisors and HR professionals about pitfalls in organizations that degrade effectiveness.

Originality/value

This article shows how the alignment between managers and their supervisors relates to effectiveness in a large-scale study across different hierarchical levels.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 June 2020

Pooja Singh Negi and Ramesh Chandra Dangwal

Various scams and swindles in banks demand effective supervision and competent workforce, as it involves with workplace accountability and undertaking customer support…

Abstract

Purpose

Various scams and swindles in banks demand effective supervision and competent workforce, as it involves with workplace accountability and undertaking customer support services. The purpose of this paper is to examine the managerial effectiveness of selected public, private and foreign banks in India.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 467 questionnaires from (middle and top-level) managers of (five public, five private and five foreign banks) fifteen banks have been considered. The descriptive statistics, t-test and ANOVA are used to differentiate each sector of banks.

Findings

The significant difference denoted in terms of managerial effectiveness among banks. The results revealed that managers of public banks are action-oriented and receptive to feedback, whereas the manager of private sector banks embodies self-disclosure and perceptiveness. The correlates, namely, action-orientation, self-disclosure and receptivity to feedback evident significant among foreign banks.

Practical implications

The consideration and application of such correlates would surely help managers, decision-makers and practitioners to enhance their effectiveness. Human resource professionals can use these results to develop programmes and policies for better management.

Originality/value

The study is imperative as it compares the behaviour of managers of public, private and foreign banks individually. The findings demonstrate that correlates of managerial effectiveness significantly differ among the banks.

Details

PSU Research Review, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2399-1747

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2010

Farhad Analoui, Abdulla A. Ahmed and Nada Kakabadse

This paper seeks to report on the findings of a recent study which explores the ways/factors which influence and/or determine the effectiveness of the senior management in…

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2412

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to report on the findings of a recent study which explores the ways/factors which influence and/or determine the effectiveness of the senior management in the Muscat Municipality, Oman, by assessing the perception of senior managers concerning the influences (parameters) on their effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

The research has utilized a combination of qualitative and quantitative methodologies. Analoui's model of “eight parameters for effectiveness” has been used as a basis to explore the awareness, perceptions, skills, organizational standards, motivation, degree of demands and constraints, and the presence of choices and opportunities for effectiveness.

Findings

Analoui's model of “managerial effectiveness” is applicable to the public sector in Oman. Senior managers are aware of their own effectiveness and better understanding of their effectiveness requires paying attention to the identified parameters and contexts in which they perform their tasks. Unfortunately, little attention has been paid to their management development.

Practical implications

It is suggested that senior managers should be enabled: to communicate effectively with other people; to manage their own time and use it effectively; to make decisions/resolve problems; and to lead and motivate employees effectively at work. The reward system needs revising and a learning environment ought to be established to foster transformational leadership.

Originality/value

This first time study contributes to the present stock of knowledge and understanding of the subject by contextualising the concept of “managerial effectiveness” in Oman's public sector.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1992

Stephen George Willcocks

Attempts to address the question of managerial effectiveness in theUK′s National Health Service, with particular reference to doctorsholding managerial positions as…

Abstract

Attempts to address the question of managerial effectiveness in the UK′s National Health Service, with particular reference to doctors holding managerial positions as clinical directors. Emphasizes a systems framework as a model for analysis of the concept of effectiveness. Identifies and discusses the importance of various managerial inputs (for example, managerial behaviour) and outputs such as objectives in business plans. Highlights the difficulty of establishing outcome measures in a service organization. Contrasts this approach with an alternative subjectivist approach which questions the validity of objective measures of effectiveness. The two approaches are not necessarily incompatible but require a convergence in the philosophical assumptions underpinning analysis. May be relevant to medical managers and other professionals acting as managers in service organizations.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

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