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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2009

Lori Foster Thompson and Kimberly R. Aspinwall

This study sets out to investigate the influence of four work/life benefits on job choice and to examine individual differences that moderate the effects of work/life benefits…

13569

Abstract

Purpose

This study sets out to investigate the influence of four work/life benefits on job choice and to examine individual differences that moderate the effects of work/life benefits during recruitment.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants (n=125) completed an internet self‐efficacy survey measuring their sense of competence in being able to use the internet effectively. They also filled out a demographic questionnaire and a policy‐capturing survey which asked them to read numerous job descriptions and rate how likely it was that they would accept each job. The levels of four benefits (childcare, telecommuting, eldercare, flextime benefits) varied across job advertisements. Analyses examined the degree to which these four independent variables affected the willingness to accept a job offer.

Findings

Childcare benefits influenced the job choices of 58 per cent of the sample. This exceeded the influence of flextime (33 per cent), telecommuting (26 per cent), and eldercare benefits (33 per cent). Childcare attracted women more than men. Internet self‐efficacy predicted the attractiveness of telecommuting.

Research limitations/implications

It is important to consider the degree to which these findings generalize to non‐US job seekers, as well as applicants in more naturalistic settings.

Practical implications

Knowledge of influential work/life benefits (e.g. childcare) can enhance recruitment efforts in a competitive marketplace. Data on variables that moderate the attractiveness of work/life policies will enable organizations to further tailor their benefits to the types of applicants they seek.

Originality/value

In practice, work/life benefits are commonly offered in the hope of recruiting new employees. Yet, little is known about which benefits best attract new graduates. Moreover, research has only begun to examine individual differences that moderate the effect of work/life policies on recruitment outcomes. The present study addresses these gaps in the literature.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Crystal L. Williamson, John G. Cope, Lori Foster Thompson and Karl L. Wuensch

During labor shortages, organizations that wish to recruit effectively must advertise jobs attractive to applicants. Demonstrates that policy capturing methodology can be used to…

1372

Abstract

During labor shortages, organizations that wish to recruit effectively must advertise jobs attractive to applicants. Demonstrates that policy capturing methodology can be used to uncover the job attributes of interest to potential applicants. Examines the influence of five organizational attributes on the willingness to apply for and accept a job offer in law enforcement. A total of 213 individuals seeking basic law enforcement training certification participated in this study. Each participant completed a survey made up of 32 scenarios varying on levels of five attributes. For the dependent variables “willingness to apply for a job” and “willingness to accept a job offer”, starting salary exerted the most influence on individuals’ job choice decisions. Relocation requirements, advancement opportunities, image, and retirement plan followed respectively in amount of influence exerted for each variable.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 August 2010

350

Abstract

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2007

Yehuda Baruch

470

Abstract

Details

Career Development International, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Allison L. Dunn, Summer F. Odom, Lori L. Moore and Craig Rotter

First-year college students in a leadership-themed living-learning community (N= 60) at Texas A&M University were surveyed to examine if participation in the learning community…

Abstract

First-year college students in a leadership-themed living-learning community (N= 60) at Texas A&M University were surveyed to examine if participation in the learning community influenced their leadership mindset using hierarchical and systemic thinking preferences. Utilizing a pre-test and post-test methodology, significant differences for hierarchical thinking were not found; however, significant differences for systemic thinking were found. At the end of the program year, students had larger systemic scores than when they started the program, but their hierarchical thinking scores remain fairly steady. Findings indicated that participation in a leadership-themed living-learning community influenced students’ leadership mindsets.

Details

Journal of Leadership Education, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1552-9045

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2011

Lori Holcomb, Candy Beal and John K. Lee

This article seeks to demonstrate how social studies has come to be an all-inclusive subject: it has become supersized. When supported by Web 2.0 technology, social studies…

1921

Abstract

This article seeks to demonstrate how social studies has come to be an all-inclusive subject: it has become supersized. When supported by Web 2.0 technology, social studies enables students to address multifaceted problems that require the deep understanding necessary to arrive at both wise and timely solutions. We discuss how curriculum integration and emerging technology applications can support the supersizing of social studies. Two instructional projects and two instructional tools are presented as examples of how social studies can be supersized through the use of Web 2.0 technologies.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2022

Rachel Martin and Amanda Denston

In this chapter, we use intentional noticing to deconstruct and reconstruct assumptions within an exploratory case study that involved a university and a school in Aotearoa New…

Abstract

In this chapter, we use intentional noticing to deconstruct and reconstruct assumptions within an exploratory case study that involved a university and a school in Aotearoa New Zealand and how this contributes to global understandings around the influence of power on notions of Indigenous languages in schools. The current chapter originates from an exploratory case study that examined the efficacy of a phonological awareness and vocabulary program for children within their early years of schooling, aimed at developing emergent literacy skills in te reo Māori (the language of Indigenous Māori peoples in Aotearoa New Zealand). Reconstructing understandings was challenged by several factors, including assumptions around the content and implementation of the program and challenges that emerged from within the research team and that influenced the engagement of teachers and children within the program. We explore how teachers and children interrupted existing models of teaching and learning that have previously been used as a tool for assimilation, to foster the development of te reo Māori and emergent literacy skills. We conclude that it is crucial for researchers to be conscious of their assumptions within the research process to decolonize practices and to develop cultural understandings of ways of being. This means that relationships with Indigenous peoples is fundamental within cross-cultural research.

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 October 2019

Allison Dunn, Lori L. Moore, Krista J. Bailey, Summer F. Odom and Gary A. Briers

Currently, more students receive leadership education from student affairs offerings than academic leadership courses. Using two simultaneous Delphi panels, Group A – 17 student…

Abstract

Currently, more students receive leadership education from student affairs offerings than academic leadership courses. Using two simultaneous Delphi panels, Group A – 17 student affairs managers and Group B – 20 student affairs preparatory program faculty members, this study sought to identify the characteristics of a student affairs leadership educator. While there was agreement (93.8%, n = 32) that student affairs practitioners are leadership educators, there was a disconnect between the two panels in how leadership education should be demonstrated within the context of student affairs. These findings support previous research that student affairs practitioners and preparatory program faculty disagree on the characteristics needed to be a successful student affairs practitioner and expands the impact of these findings into the area of leadership education.

Details

Journal of Leadership Education, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1552-9045

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 April 2021

Allison L. Dunn, Lori L. Moore, Summer F. Odom, Gary E. Briers and Krista J. Bailey

Recent research has shown that student affairs practitioners are characterized as leadership educators by experts in their field, but leadership education traditionally is not…

Abstract

Recent research has shown that student affairs practitioners are characterized as leadership educators by experts in their field, but leadership education traditionally is not part of a student affairs preparatory program, nor is leadership education a commonly discussed professional competency. Using two simultaneous Delphi panels, Group A: Student Affairs Practitioners/Managers (n=17) and Group B: Student Affairs Preparatory Program Faculty/Directors (n=20), this study sought to ascertain the competencies required of entry-level student affairs leadership educators. Between the two panels, 128 unique competencies were identified. Four recommendations are provided to strengthen the professional development of student affairs leadership educators.

Details

Journal of Leadership Education, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1552-9045

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2022

Abstract

Details

Global Meaning Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-933-1

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