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Article
Publication date: 16 January 2007

Dennis Ocholla and Theo Bothma

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the status, trends and challenges of library and information education and training in Eastern and Southern Africa. It notes that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the status, trends and challenges of library and information education and training in Eastern and Southern Africa. It notes that library and information education and training in Africa is undergoing rapid change, with difficult challenges to be overcome. For example, during the past 20 years, the number of library schools has grown in some regions and declined in some, such as South Africa. Common LIS factors include amalgamation, re‐orientation, and curriculum review and revision.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors' extensive experience with and exposure to LIS education has been used together with observations and literature survey in the field to inform this paper.

Findings

It is evident that LIS schools have, to a greater or lesser extent, been redesigning their curricula to keep track of the latest developments in the information world and keep their teaching market‐related. New qualification programmes have been developed to provide opportunities for further specialization. In many cases departments have changed their names to reflect these new focus areas and extensions, and in many cases departments have realigned themselves within their universities. It is evident that LIS schools have taken the challenges of the changing information environment very seriously, and have adapted their curricula, their names and their institutional alignments to reflect these changes.

Research limitations/implications

The paper raises fundamental issues concerning trends, challenges and opportunities for LIS education and training in eastern and southern Africa by largely drawing examples from the authors' experience and related African studies in the domain.

Practical implications

The paper provides useful current information to inform LIS educators, researchers, students and other stakeholders on the issues and challenges of LIS education in the region.

Originality/value

Information provided in this paper is of value for comparative studies on LIS education and training. The paper is current and largely informed by participant observation, participation and experiential knowledge that is fresh and well informed.

Details

New Library World, vol. 108 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 29 December 2004

Joan C. Durrance

Libraries and librarians have long been early adopters of information technologies. For decades, librarians have applied computerization to library operations…

Abstract

Libraries and librarians have long been early adopters of information technologies. For decades, librarians have applied computerization to library operations. Standardization and computerization of bibliographic records decades ago made possible automation of library systems, the creation and utilization of giant bibliographic utilities such as OCLC with its 52 million records. Collaborative adoption of information technologies decades ago brought shared cataloging, on-line public access catalogs, bibliographic databases, enhanced interlibrary loan and document delivery, and acquisition of information in digital formats, resulting in worldwide access to library resources. Nonetheless the revolution in information technologies that produced the World Wide Web in the mid-1990s hit the information profession of librarianship and the educational establishment like an earthquake.

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-005-0

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2012

Chuanfu Chen, Ping Wang, Dan Wu, Yaqi Liu, Gang Wu and Haoqin Ma

The goal of this paper is to identify the attitudes of the chairs of library and information science (LIS) programs in Chinese universities toward the iSchools movement.

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of this paper is to identify the attitudes of the chairs of library and information science (LIS) programs in Chinese universities toward the iSchools movement.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected data from 36 deans or other chairs of LIS by using open‐ended questionnaire and utilized grounded theory to analyze the results.

Findings

The result shows that most chairpersons approve the iSchools values of relationship between people, information and technology, nevertheless, they expressed uncertainty regarding the future of iSchools. For the process of adopting the values of iSchools and joining the iSchools movement, the main risks to progress come from within the LIS schools or departments. The consensus among the chairpersons is that the LIS education should reserve its traditional core values, as well as adopt iSchools' values and widely expand in the information profession area.

Originality/value

This study unveiled the attitudes of LIS chairs toward the iSchools movement in China. Its results can help the iSchools movement to develop and promote LIS education innovation globally.

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Abstract

Details

European Origins of Library and Information Science
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-718-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Primoz Juznic and Branka Badovinac

The paper seeks to present an analysis of the development of schools of librarianship and information science (LIS) in the European Union (EU) applicant states until 2004…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to present an analysis of the development of schools of librarianship and information science (LIS) in the European Union (EU) applicant states until 2004. It discusses the potential and actual changes in their organisation, notably their curriculum.

Design/methodology/approach

The comparative analysis of LIS programmes was performed. The model presented by T.D. Wilson in 2001 was selected as the model for analysing the data. The aim was to support the Wilson model with some empirical data from the specific countries.

Findings

The results show that the long history of traditional library education in these schools was not a great obstacle to adapting the curriculum to new professional and political standards. LIS schools have generally changed their curriculum towards those of modern LIS schools and have also embraced the EU outlines regarding higher education, especially the Bologna Declaration.

Research limitations/implications

This study has its limitations as it is based only on the formal courses’ names and the formal content. Comparative analysis could also be accomplished through analysing courses' content, students and teaching staff.

Originality/value

The theoretical model of LIS courses analysis was tested on the LIS programmes in EU new member and applicant states. Testing the model shows its weaknesses and strengths. This could be developed in a simple but practical and useful tool for LIS programmes comparison and harmonisation, where necessary.

Details

New Library World, vol. 106 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Koraljka Golub, Joacim Hansson and Lars Selden

The purpose of the paper is to analyse three Scandinavian iSchools in Denmark, Norway and Sweden with regard to their intentions of becoming iSchools and curriculum…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to analyse three Scandinavian iSchools in Denmark, Norway and Sweden with regard to their intentions of becoming iSchools and curriculum content in relation to these intentions. By doing so, a picture will be given of the international expansion of the iSchool concept in terms of organisational symbolism and practical educational content. In order to underline the approaches of the Scandinavian schools, comparisons are made to three American iSchools.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is framed through theory on organisational symbolism and the intentions of the iSchool movement as formulated in its vision statements. Empirically, the study consists of two parts: close readings of three documents outlining the considerations of three Scandinavian LIS schools before applying for the iSchool status, and statistical analysis of 427 syllabi from master level courses at three Scandinavian and three American iSchools.

Findings

All three Scandinavian schools, analysed, have recently become iSchools, and though some differences are visible, it is hard to distinguish anything in their syllabi as carriers of what can be described as an iSchool identity. In considering iSchool identity, it instead benefits on a symbolic level that are most prominent, such as branding, social visibility and the possible attraction of new student groups. The traditionally strong relation to national library sectors are emphasised as important to maintain, specifically in Norway and Sweden.

Research limitations/implications

The study is done on iSchools in Denmark, Norway and Sweden with empirical comparison to three American schools. These comparisons face the challenge of meeting the educational system and programme structure of each individual country. Despite this, findings prove possible to use as ground for conclusions, although empirical generalisations concerning, for instance, other countries must be made with caution.

Practical implications

This study highlights the practical challenges met in international expansion of the iSchool movement, both on a practical and symbolic level. Both the iSchool Caucus and individual schools considering becoming iSchools may use these findings as a point of reference in development and decision making.

Originality/value

This is an original piece of research from which the results may contribute to the international development of the iSchool movement, and extend the theoretical understanding of the iSchool movement as an educational and organisational construct.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 73 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Ismail Abdullahi and Leif Kajberg

Internationalization of Library and Information Science (LIS) education is not only desirable but also critically necessary. The education of future library and information

Abstract

Internationalization of Library and Information Science (LIS) education is not only desirable but also critically necessary. The education of future library and information professionals who are able to understand the global information access, and to promote systems of communication among people throughout the world are vital for the success of the profession. This paper examines and analyzes the inclusion of international issues in LIS education in Europe, the USA, and Canada. The data gathered via a questionnaire survey of 60 LIS programs in Europe, the USA and Canada are presented. The provision of a program that addresses global views in LIS education is recommended.

Details

New Library World, vol. 105 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2020

Chukwuma Clement Okeji and Okeoghene Mayowa-Adebara

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the library school’s curriculum in Nigeria with the aim of comparing it with international and national library and information

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the library school’s curriculum in Nigeria with the aim of comparing it with international and national library and information science (LIS) guidelines regarding provision of “digital libraries” course.

Design/methodology/approach

This study covered 31 universities offering LIS approved by the National Universities Commission (NUC). The main instrument for data collection for the study was analysis of departmental documents containing the LIS curriculum. Second, some library and information science educators from universities that were yet to integrate the course digital libraries in their LIS curriculum were interviewed.

Findings

This study revealed that majority of the library schools offer the course “digital libraries” or related areas as core course in their curricula. However, only few library schools have computer laboratories for students to enhance digital library skills. Some LIS educators in the library schools identified challenges such as lack of qualified information and communication technology (ICT) staff to handle the course coupled with lack of computer laboratories equipped with modern computers with stable internet facilities in the LIS departments in Nigeria.

Practical implications

The findings from this study may inform curriculum revision and updating efforts to make it more relevant by incorporating a stand-alone course on “digital librariesand provision of computer laboratories in the LIS departments to produce future ICT/digital librarians.

Originality/value

If university administrators, decision-making body in the departments and LIS educators understand the factors that are currently standing in the way of integrating a course on digital libraries, then those barriers can be removed or lowered. If the enabling factors are appreciated, then actions can be taken to stimulate the implementation of the Librarians’ Registration Council of Nigeria (LRCN)/NUC recommendations in all library schools in Nigerian universities.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 5 December 2008

Linda C. Smith

Funding, first from foundations and later also from government agencies, has been a factor in shaping the development of education for library (and information) science in…

Abstract

Funding, first from foundations and later also from government agencies, has been a factor in shaping the development of education for library (and information) science in the U.S. for more than 80 years. Educational programs experienced substantial investments in three periods: (1) from the Carnegie Corporation in the 1920s and 1930s; (2) from the U.S. Office of Education in the 1960s and 1970s; and (3) from the Institute of Museum and Library Services in the first decade of the 21st century. This chapter documents the impacts of the first two and argues for the need to analyze the impact of the third. Other, more modest, investments from both foundations and government agencies have had less lasting impact. This chapter identifies the major sources of funding and projects funded, assesses the level and type of impact, and concludes with implications for the future. The focus is on funding for research, development, and resource enhancement in library (and information) science education, not research conducted by library and information science (LIS) faculty on other topics (e.g., as funded by the OCLC/ALISE library and information science research grant program) (Connaway, 2005).

Details

Influence of Funding on Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-373-6

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Book part
Publication date: 12 June 2013

David A. Jank, Heting Chu and Michael E.D. Koenig

This chapter updates earlier research that analyzed mergers, collaborations, and similar trends in LIS education, and provides a more comprehensive current summary of…

Abstract

This chapter updates earlier research that analyzed mergers, collaborations, and similar trends in LIS education, and provides a more comprehensive current summary of those trends. Three distinct patterns are beginning to emerge in both organizational structure and collaboration: changes in the nature of LIS program partnerships within parent educational institutions; the impact on LIS education by prominent academic associations that are not reliant on ALA accreditation recognition; and the growth in the number and type of academic offerings in LIS schools themselves. Among some notable changes are the establishment of the Consortium of iSchools Asia Pacific (CiSAP), continued growth in the iSchool caucus and its increasing international membership. Additionally the number of dual degree master’s programs in which LIS departments partner is on the rise, as is the number of degrees now being offered at LIS schools (both at the undergraduate and graduate levels) that are not “traditional” MLS degrees. Inter-institutional collaborative MLIS programs are also emergent, evident in such programs as the Web-based Information Science Education (WISE) consortium. The data presented here seem to suggest that the face of LIS education continues to change as the 21st century gets underway.

Details

Mergers and Alliances: The Wider View
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-479-4

Keywords

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