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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2018

Lee-Ann Fenge, Kip Jones and Camilla Gibson

Lack of understanding of the needs of older LGBT individuals is a global issue and their needs are often ignored by health and social care providers who adopt sexuality-blind…

Abstract

Purpose

Lack of understanding of the needs of older LGBT individuals is a global issue and their needs are often ignored by health and social care providers who adopt sexuality-blind approaches within their provision. As a result, public services can find it difficult to push the LGBT equalities agenda forward due to resistance to change and underlying discrimination. The aim of this paper is to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This report considers how a body of participatory research concerning the needs and experiences of older LGBT people was used to create innovatory dissemination tools, which then engaged communities through public engagement to learn about the needs and experiences of older LGBT citizens. Good research has a “long tail” – (in statistics, “a large number of occurrences far from the ‘head’ or central part of the distribution”). The report considers how a film and a method deck of cards, presented to service providers in several workshops over time, offered opportunities to learn and critically reflect upon an informed practice.

Findings

Because of the on-going feedback from our workshops, the authors, in turn, learned the importance of having a champion within a community organisation to take forward the LGBT agenda. A report of one such outreach champion is included here.

Originality/value

Consideration is given to challenges involved in creating impact through research, and how participatory community processes may enhance impact to develop over time.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Emma Dickerson, Lee-Ann Fenge and Emily Rosenorn-Lanng

This paper aims to explore the learning needs of general practitioners (GPs) involved in commissioning mental health provision in England, and offer an evaluation of a leadership…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the learning needs of general practitioners (GPs) involved in commissioning mental health provision in England, and offer an evaluation of a leadership and commissioning skills development programme for Mental Health Commissioners.

Design/methodology/approach

Retrospective mixed method, including online mixed method survey, rating participants’ knowledge, skills, abilities, semi-structured telephone interviews and third-party questionnaires were used. Results were analysed for significant differences using the Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test. Open-ended responses and interview transcripts were analysed thematically.

Findings

Indicative results showed that participants perceived significant impacts in ability across eight key question groups evaluated. Differences were found between the perceived and observed impact in relation to technical areas covered within the programme which were perceived as the highest scoring impacts by participants.

Research limitations/implications

The indicative results show a positive impact on practice has been both perceived and observed. Findings illustrate the value of this development programme on both the personal development of GP Mental Health Commissioners and commissioning practice. Although the findings of this evaluation increase understanding in relation to an important and topical area, larger scale, prospective evaluations are required. Impact evaluations could be embedded within future programmes to encourage higher participant and third-party engagement. Future evaluations would benefit from collection and analysis of attendance data. Further research could involve patient, service user and carer perspectives on mental health commissioning.

Originality value

Results of this evaluation could inform the development of future learning programmes for mental health commissioners as part of a national approach to improve mental health provision.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 December 2015

Sean Olivier, Trish Burls, Lee-Ann Fenge and Keith Brown

The purpose of this paper is to report the findings from a small qualitative study of victims of mass marketing fraud (MMF), exploring how they become involved in such activity…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the findings from a small qualitative study of victims of mass marketing fraud (MMF), exploring how they become involved in such activity and then sustain their involvement. The paper concludes with recommendations for practitioners involved in supporting vulnerable older people.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper considers a small qualitative case study into the vulnerability of older people (n=3) to MMF from the perspectives of the “victims” of such fraud.

Findings

This paper highlights a range of predisposing risk factors to MMF which emerged as key themes including the psycho-social background of the victim, emotional vulnerability, the need for meaningful activity and opportunities engagement in meaningful social activity.

Research limitations/implications

The small scale of this research is a limitation, but as there is currently a dearth of research in this area it makes a valuable contribution to the developing knowledge base.

Practical implications

Professionals need to develop increased understanding of the complexities of sustained involvement in MMF, and the ways in which fraudsters manipulate potential victims by “grooming” and luring through plausible schemes which appear genuine to the victim.

Social implications

MMF is a growing threat in the financial abuse of older people, and is increasingly recognized as a concern for professionals involved in supporting and safeguarding vulnerable older people.

Originality/value

Despite the growing awareness of MMF in the financial abuse of vulnerable older people, this paper is one of the first to consider the perspectives of victims of MMF.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Lisa Ruth Oakley, Lee-Ann Fenge, Simon Bass and Justin Humphreys

The purpose of this paper is to report the findings from a study exploring the understanding of vulnerability and adult safeguarding within Christian faith-based settings. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the findings from a study exploring the understanding of vulnerability and adult safeguarding within Christian faith-based settings. The paper concludes with recommendations for practitioners involved in safeguarding adults in faith-based Christian settings.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper considers a survey (n=3,182) into understanding of vulnerability and adult safeguarding for individuals who attend Church regularly or work in a Christian organisation

Findings

This study is the first to be undertaken with a UK sample and highlights a range of factors informing adult safeguarding practice within Christian organisations. This includes: complexity linked to understanding vulnerability and its role in safeguarding activity; lack of clarity about what to do with a safeguarding adult concern; and the need for safeguarding training pertinent to the particular needs of faith-based settings.

Research limitations/implications

As there is currently a dearth of research in this area this paper makes a valuable contribution to the developing knowledge base around safeguarding and vulnerability within faith-based organisations.

Practical implications

Professionals need to develop increased understanding of the complexities involved in safeguarding activity, and specifically how those working in the wider context of supporting vulnerable adults make sense of safeguarding processes and procedures.

Social implications

It is important that all organisations, including faith-based settings, working with adults have an understanding of their roles and responsibilities with respect to safeguarding those at risk of harm.

Originality/value

This paper is the first UK study to consider safeguarding adults at risk of harm in Christian faith contexts.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

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