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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2012

Magdolna Csath

The purpose of this paper is to find out whether any relationship can be found among learning orientation, learning culture in general and innovation achievements in SMEs.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to find out whether any relationship can be found among learning orientation, learning culture in general and innovation achievements in SMEs.

Design/methodology/approach

In‐depth research based on questionnaires and interviews was carried out. The sample was analyzed using multivariable correlation.

Findings

It is found that to the majority of SMEs innovation means product or technology innovation, and only a negligible minority think about management‐related innovation. There are few SMEs who encourage learning and act upon building a learning culture, but those who do are far more innovative than the rest. Those with a low interest in learning and building a learning culture perform poorly in innovation.

Research limitations/implications

International comparison would have been useful, especially in the region.

Practical implications

The research has proved that an encouraging external environment and a supporting internal environment are equally important for successful innovation in SMEs. Therefore the government and the EU in general should support SMEs' innovation more successfully, and SMEs should put more emphasis on learning, knowledge creation and building of a learning culture.

Social implications

For societies suffering from a high unemployment rate it is crucial to find sources for job creation. Innovative SMEs can be the best sources for new jobs.

Originality/value

The importance of learning, learning culture and knowledge creation for innovation in SMEs has been proved.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Saskia Harkema

Innovation is the lifeblood of companies, while simultaneously being one of the most difficult and elusive processes to manage. Failure rates are high – varying between…

Abstract

Innovation is the lifeblood of companies, while simultaneously being one of the most difficult and elusive processes to manage. Failure rates are high – varying between six out of ten to nine out of ten – while the need to innovate is high. Departing from a real‐life case of a company, Sara Lee/Douwe Egberts, that has set learning within and from innovation projects high on the agenda, the main ideas about learning and innovation will be unfolded in the course of this article. It will be argued that most learning theories rest on a sender‐receiver model of knowledge transmission and this affects how people learn within innovation projects. A complex adaptive approach offers an alternative perspective from which one can evaluate and analyze learning and innovation processes. The most important characteristics of complex adaptive systems are non‐linearity, dynamic behavior, emergence and self‐organization. The implications of these phenomena for learning in innovation projects will be explained. The article finalizes with the preliminary findings of a multi‐agent simulation model, which explores what the underlying forces are beneath learning in innovation projects.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Milton Correia de Sousa

The purpose of this article is to present a model for sustainable innovation based on learning and knowledge.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to present a model for sustainable innovation based on learning and knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

Definitions of knowledge, innovation and learning are provided. Followed by a discussion on the link between knowledge and innovation, the concept of the nominal innovation probability space is introduced, built on the definitions of knowledge depth and knowledge diversity. Different learning styles are presented and how these can increase knowledge depth and knowledge diversity, improving a firm's position in the innovation probability space. A final description is provided of a model for the sustainable innovation engine.

Findings

The article finds that learning is essential to ensure sustainable innovation. Innovation probability is impacted by the organisation's knowledge depth and diversity. Learning styles are correlated to the firm's innovativeness and competitiveness. Experimentation as a learning style is essential for discontinuous innovation. Learning effectiveness is increased if supported by a knowledge management approach. Sustainable innovation requires a positive feedback loop between knowledge creation (learning) and innovation.

Originality/value

The article provides useful information on the introduction of the nominal innovation probability space based on a firm's knowledge depth and diversity; the concept of knowledge empathy; and the distinction between innovation and sustainable innovation and its importance for competitive and collaborative advantage.

Details

VINE, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Merja Mari-Anne Drake

The purpose of this paper is to test how to integrate innovation pedagogy into journalism and information and communication technology (ICT) teaching while creating a new…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test how to integrate innovation pedagogy into journalism and information and communication technology (ICT) teaching while creating a new product for a national media industry. The objectives of the study were to create a new joint course model in which students from different degree programmes would learn and create products and services together in three different stages: networked and collaborative learning, group-based learning and individual learning.

Design/methodology/approach

Innovation pedagogy is a practically oriented method and can be used for doing applied research. This new learning approach defines how knowledge is assimilated, produced and used while innovating. The research focus is on applied research, and one vital aim is to enhance students’ ability to participate in research and development activities with businesses and other organisations in society.

Findings

The learning outcomes based on learning at all stages, i.e. individual, group and networks, were successfully achieved, and a new course model was created. However, the model needs further development.

Originality/value

Innovation pedagogy is a new learning approach. Innovation has been a buzz word in education for at least for a decade – some universities have even embedded innovative thinking throughout their curricula, leading to a new learning approach called innovation pedagogy. Could innovation pedagogy help us to achieve better learning outcomes? Do journalists really need innovation competences? Could journalists and ICT students study together? To answer these questions, the authors began an experiment that uses innovation pedagogy.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2003

Seleshi Sisaye

Accounting for quality and improved organizational performance has recently received attention in management control research. However, the extent to which process…

Abstract

Accounting for quality and improved organizational performance has recently received attention in management control research. However, the extent to which process innovation changes have been integrated into management control research is limited. This paper contributes to that integration by drawing from institutional adaptive theory of organizational change and process innovation strategies. The paper utilizes a 2 by 2 contingency table that uses two factors: environmental conditions and organizational change/learning strategies, to build a process innovation framework. A combination of these two factors yields four process innovation strategies: mechanistic, organic, organizational development (OD) and organizational transformation (OT).

The four process innovation typologies are applied to characterize innovations in accounting such as activity based costing (ABC). ABC has been discussed as a multi-phased innovation process that provides an environment where both the initiation and the implementation of accounting change can occur. Technical innovation can be successfully initiated as organic innovation that unfolds in a decentralized organization and requires radical change and double loop learning. Implementation occurs best as a mechanistic innovation in a hierarchical organization and involving incremental change and single loop learning. The paper concludes that if ABC is integrated into an OD or OT intervention strategy, the technical and administrative innovation aspects of ABC can be utilized to manage the organization’s operating activities.

Details

Advances in Management Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-207-8

Abstract

Purpose

The paper extends the organizational learning framework: Structural-Functional (SF)-single-loop or Conflictual-Radical (CR)-double-loop learning to the management accounting literature. The sociological approach of organizational learning is utilized to understand those contingent factors that can explain why management accounting innovations succeed or fail in organizations.

Approach

We view learning as enhancing an organization’s strategic competitive advantage by making it better able to adopt and diffuse innovation in respond to changes in its environment in order to manage improved performance. The success of management accounting innovations is contingent upon whether its learning process involves SF-single-loop or CR-double-loop learning to adopt and diffuse process innovation.

Findings

The paper suggests that the learning strategy that the organization chooses is the reason why some management accounting innovations are more successfully adopted than others and why some innovations are easily diffused in some organizations but not in others. We propose that the sociological approaches to learning provide an alternative framework with which to better understand the adoption and diffusion of process innovations in management accounting systems.

Originality

It has become evident that management accounting researchers need to pay particular attention to an organization’s approach to adoption and diffusion of innovation strategies, particularly when they are designing and implementing process innovation programs for an organization. According to Schulz (2001), there are two interrelated stages of the learning that can shape the outcome of the innovation process in an organization. The first stage is related to the acquisition/production (adoption) of knowledge that results in gathering information, codification, and exploration. This is followed by the second stage which is the distribution or dissemination (diffusion) processes. When these two stages – adoption and diffusion – are applied within an accounting context, they address issues that are commonly associated with the successes and/or failures of management accounting innovations.

Research limitations/implications

Although innovation involves learning, the nature of the learning process does not completely describe the manner in which an innovation affects the organization. Accordingly, we suggest that the two interrelated organizational sociological dimensions of innovations processes, namely, (1) the adoption and diffusion theories of Rogers (1971 and 1995), to approach organizational learning, and (2) the SF (single loop) and CR (double loop) approaches to learning be used simultaneously to describe management accounting innovations.

Practical implications

When an innovation is implemented, it initially can be introduced as an incremental change, one that can be limited in both in its scope and its breadth of administrative changes. This means that situations which are most likely to benefit from its initiation can serve as the prototype for its adoption by the organization. If successful, this can be followed by systemic accounting innovations to instituting broader administrative changes within the existing accounting reporting and control systems.

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Ruey-Jer “Bryan” Jean, Jyh-Shen Chiou and Rudolf R. Sinkovics

This study aims to explore how absorptive and joint learning can foster radical innovation. Furthermore, dependence asymmetry is investigated as a moderator of the effects…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore how absorptive and joint learning can foster radical innovation. Furthermore, dependence asymmetry is investigated as a moderator of the effects of these factors on radical innovation. Radical innovation is an important source of any firm’s success. Yet, there has been a dearth of research in the literature on how different types of inter-partner learning cultivate the process of generating such innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a sample of 204 Taiwanese electronics suppliers to test the effects of joint learning and absorptive learning on radical innovation. The empirical analysis adopts a structural equations modeling approach.

Findings

The authors find that a supplier’s joint learning has a stronger effect on radical innovation than its absorptive learning. However, when accounting for the moderating effect of dependence asymmetry, the analysis shows that absorptive learning does have a significant effect on radical innovation. The effect of joint learning on radical innovation is not moderated by the degree of dependence asymmetry.

Practical Implications

This study broadens and deepens the understanding of how radical innovation by suppliers can be generated in customer–supplier relationships, and how this is shaped by the power-dependence structure.

Originality/value

Inter-partner learning; radical innovation; power; dependence.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2015

Hardeep Chahal and Purnima Bakshi

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of intellectual capital on competitive advantage in banking sector. Further, it also examines the role of innovation

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of intellectual capital on competitive advantage in banking sector. Further, it also examines the role of innovation as a mediating variable and organisational learning as a moderating variable in intellectual capital and competitive advantage relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are collected from 144 branches of 21 public and seven private banks operating in Northern India (Jammu). Three executives (including one manager and two senior employees) from each branch are contacted purposively. Out of 576 questionnaires distributed, 339 questionnaires are returned with response rate of 62.08 per cent.

Findings

The study finds that intellectual capital has direct and positive impact on the competitive advantage. It is also verified that innovation fully mediates the relationship between intellectual capital and competitive advantage. Further, the moderating effect of organisational learning on the relationship between intellectual capital and competitive advantage is also confirmed.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to the banking sector of Jammu city only. Only three dimensions of intellectual capital are considered in the present study.

Originality/value

The study represents the relationship between intellectual capital and competitive advantage in banking sector. The results extend the understanding of the role of organisational learning and innovation in creating intellectual capital and building sustainable advantages for organisations.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Daniel Jiménez‐Jimenez, Raquel Sanz Valle and Miguel Hernandez‐Espallardo

The purpose of this paper is to study empirically the relationships between market orientation, organizational learning, innovation and performance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study empirically the relationships between market orientation, organizational learning, innovation and performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper formulates some hypotheses from the literature review. These hypotheses are tested using structural equations modelling with data collected from 744 firms.

Findings

Findings show that, although market orientation and organizational learning foster innovation, the effect of the latter is comparatively higher. Moreover, the impact of market orientation and organizational learning on performance is completely mediated by innovation.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitations of this paper are the cross‐sectional design of the research and the use of single informants for collecting the data. Apart from overcoming these limitations, for future research it is suggested that: studying the likely causal relation between market orientation and organizational learning; taking into account information about how radical the innovation is; and including the degree of dynamism of the market as a likely moderator of the relations proposed in the model.

Practical implications

The paper provides evidence, first, that companies should be more innovative in order to increase performance. Second, that both adopting market orientation and improving the organizational learning processes of the company have a positive impact on innovation. And third, that innovation mediates the relation between market orientation and organizational learning, and performance.

Originality/value

This paper jointly examines in the same model the little‐researched links between market orientation, organizational learning, innovation and performance.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2010

Seleshi Sisaye and Jacob G. Birnberg

The purpose of this paper is to apply the organizational learning framework to the management accounting literature to better understand why management accounting…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply the organizational learning framework to the management accounting literature to better understand why management accounting innovations succeed or fail in organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical framework integrating diffusion and organization learning theories is developed. Diffusion theory is used to describe the process whereby the innovation is implemented. Argyris' and Argyris and Schon's theory of organizational learning is used to describe the type of learning – single loop or double loop – required by the innovation. Finally, the works of Attewell, and of Schulz relating to organizational learning, and of Rogers and of Sandberg relating to adoption and diffusion theories, were utilized to identify and understand the potential pitfalls faced by managements implementing an accounting innovation.

Findings

The paper advances the notion that an organization's approach to learning and innovation should be of interest to management accounting researchers. The single‐loop (incremental/organizational development (OD)) and the double‐loop (radical/organizational transformation (OT)) learning influences the adoption (stage one) and diffusion (stage two) strategies that are appropriate for the design and implementation of management accounting innovations.

Originality/value

The paper makes an important contribution to the behavioral accounting literature by integrating sociological diffusion and organizational learning behavior literatures and relating them to management accounting research.

Details

Review of Accounting and Finance, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-7702

Keywords

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