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1 – 10 of 72
Article
Publication date: 27 June 2022

Lauren Hunter, Sarah Gerritsen and Victoria Egli

This literature scoping review aims to investigate if, how and why eating behaviours change after a crisis event such as a natural disaster, financial crisis or pandemic in…

Abstract

Purpose

This literature scoping review aims to investigate if, how and why eating behaviours change after a crisis event such as a natural disaster, financial crisis or pandemic in high-income countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The COVID-19 pandemic and resulting “lockdowns” and social distancing measures have changed access to food, the types of food consumed and usual eating behaviours. Early research on the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic is compared with existing literature on other high-impact crises in high-income countries around the world, such as Hurricane Katrina and the Global Financial Crisis. A search of four electronic databases in August 2020 of literature from 2000 to 2020 yielded 50 relevant publications that were included in the qualitative thematic analysis.

Findings

The analysis found that crisis events made accessing food more difficult and led to increased food insecurity. Home cooking, sharing food and eating together (within households during the pandemic) all increased during and after a crisis. Resources often reduced and needed to be pooled. Crises had a multi-directional impact on dietary patterns, and the motivators for dietary pattern change differ between populations and crises.

Originality/value

In conclusion, eating behaviours impacted by crises because of the disruption of food systems, increased food insecurity and changes in daily routines. Community networks were a strong protective factor against adverse outcomes from food insecurity.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 53 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 February 2010

Brian Lym, Hal Grossman, Lauren Yannotta and Makram Talih

This paper seeks to address the administration of Standardized Assessment of Information Literacy Skills (SAILS), the use of SAILS report data, and respondent perceptions of the…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to address the administration of Standardized Assessment of Information Literacy Skills (SAILS), the use of SAILS report data, and respondent perceptions of the utility of SAILS at institutions that comprise the “All Institutions Benchmark” – the institutions which participated in the SAILS testing through the Spring 2007 testing period.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was used to collect qualitative and quantitative data for the study. Overall response rate for the survey was 63.9 percent. Disregarding unusable responses, the response rate for the data analysis was 57.8 percent.

Findings

The large majority of institutions used convenience sampling in administering SAILS. With regard to the SAILS report data, there are indications that those institutions that received support for data analysis were more likely to find the results useful; the utility of the SAILS report data can also be correlated with institutional type.

Practical implications

Results from this study suggest that SAILS can be most effective if there is statistical/institutional research support for data analysis, if the sampling method for selecting test takers is more rigorous, if SAILS is used in conjunction with other instruments, and if the SAILS data is correlated with other institutional data.

Originality/value

There have been few published studies on the large‐scale administration of standardized information literacy assessments. Moreover, there has been no other published research study assessing multiple institutions' experience of administering SAILS and using SAILS results. Institutions interested in the use of SAILS and other well‐known standardized information literacy tests will find this paper especially relevant.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 December 2023

Lauren Schnell-Peskin, Gina Riley, Kristen Hodnett, Virginia Gryta and April Kisamore

It is now considered commonplace to teach in a multigenerational higher education classroom that is made up of Baby Boomers, Generation X, Y and Z students. To ensure that all…

Abstract

Purpose

It is now considered commonplace to teach in a multigenerational higher education classroom that is made up of Baby Boomers, Generation X, Y and Z students. To ensure that all students, regardless of their generational identity, are successful in the classroom, educators must teach purposefully, with an understanding of the variables that affect student learning. Educators must ensure instruction is delivered according to varying student strengths and needs. This paper will provide guidance for higher education faculty teaching in multigenerational classrooms by reviewing the strengths and weaknesses across student generations. The most effective instructional practices for teaching will be discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

This article is a literature review focused on meeting the needs of multigenerational learners in synchronous and asynchronous online learning classrooms.

Findings

To ensure that all students, regardless of generational identity, are successful in the classroom, educators must teach purposefully, with an understanding of the variables that affect student learning. A summary of these generational strengths and needs are discussed within this paper.

Practical implications

This paper will provide guidance for higher education faculty teaching in multigenerational classrooms by reviewing the strengths and weaknesses across student generations.

Originality/value

This paper will provide guidance for higher education faculty teaching in multigenerational classrooms by reviewing the strengths and weaknesses across student generations. The most effective instructional practices for teaching will be discussed.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 1 May 2014

Amy L. Brownlee and Britt Isaac Beda

Lauren Tate began a new career at a new organization. Based on information she learned in a recent MBA Leadership course, Lauren approached her new workplace with the goal of…

Abstract

Case description

Lauren Tate began a new career at a new organization. Based on information she learned in a recent MBA Leadership course, Lauren approached her new workplace with the goal of being more strategic in her interpersonal interactions. She focussed on identifying and building sources of power in this new career and proactively managed her evolving relationships. At some levels, she was very successful and effective but some relationships were characterized by stress. The case asks students to analyze Lauren's actions to determine which were effective and how her actions could have been even more effective.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 25 March 2021

John T. Fleming and Lauren Lawley Head

Abstract

Details

Ultimate Gig
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-860-7

Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

Richard Hunt and Lauren Ortiz-Hunt

The purpose of this paper is to develop and empirically test the theory that new industry entrants hold advantages over incumbents in the shift from unidirectional to…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and empirically test the theory that new industry entrants hold advantages over incumbents in the shift from unidirectional to multi-directional revenue streams.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a Cobb-Douglas production function, modified to isolate returns to innovation, the authors examine data from three separate contexts: steamships on Western US rivers (1810-1860), satellite-based internet services (1962-2010) and food waste recycling (1995-2015).

Findings

The results reveal that while incumbents often attempt to stretch existing technologies to fit emerging circumstances, entrepreneurial innovators achieve greater success by approaching multi-directional value creation as a distinct challenge, one requiring new technologies, organizational forms and business models. Existing theories have primarily attributed incumb ent inertia to a firm’s inability perceive and pursue radical innovations, the results also suggest that existing firms are unwilling to pursue innovations that are likely to erode the marginal profitability of their respective business models. Ironically, rather than protecting incumbents’ financial interests, the authors find that “marginal reasoning” can lead to diminished performance and even extinction.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed framework and empirical findings have implications for numerous multi-directional frontiers, including: social networking, commercial space travel, distance education and medical treatments using nanoscale technologies.

Practical implications

While incumbents often lament the destabilizing effects of multi-directionality, new and small firms enjoy a compelling array of entry points and opportunities.

Originality/value

Scholars, incumbent firms and start-ups both benefit from insights stemming from the novel formulation of multi-directionality challenges and opportunities.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 55 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 April 2010

Lan Xia

Browsing is a common consumer behavior, but it has not been researched extensively. The aim of this paper is to fill some of the gaps in the research.

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Abstract

Purpose

Browsing is a common consumer behavior, but it has not been researched extensively. The aim of this paper is to fill some of the gaps in the research.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on literature from different areas, consumers' browsing experiences, browsing patterns, and factors influencing browsing activities are empirically examined. A combination of interviews and shopping trips with informants to examine the issues are used.

Findings

The results show that browsing serves both functional and recreational purposes. Consumers vary by the degree to which they browse functionally or recreationally. Browsing behaviors are influenced by both consumer characteristics and the retail environment. Browsing is a powerful consumer information acquisition activity and has both desired and undesired consequences for consumer purchases. Consumers use various strategies to cope with the undesired consequences.

Practical implications

Exploration of browsing patterns and factors influencing these patterns suggests important managerial implications for enhancing desirable browsing and reducing unnecessary browsing.

Originality/value

The conceptualization and findings of this research contribute to two areas of research: consumer information search and consumer shopping behaviors in retail environments. An examination of the role of browsing offers an empirical extension to the information acquisition framework.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 August 2021

Lauren Butler and Sue Ledwith

This study aims to explore service users’ experience of psychological therapy as part of a community sentence with a Mental Health Treatment Requirement (MHTR) in Birmingham…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore service users’ experience of psychological therapy as part of a community sentence with a Mental Health Treatment Requirement (MHTR) in Birmingham Courts between January and December 2018.

Design/methodology/approach

All service users that had therapy in this period were telephoned a month after ending and offered a semi-structured telephone interview. Seven service users agreed to be recorded. This data was then transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis to gain a richer understanding of their lived experience.

Findings

Themes identified were: Is the MHTR for me? Opening up, enlightening connections and personal change. Service users initially questioned the relevance and burden of the order for them; the experience of therapy allowed them to trust and talk about things unsaid in the past; this helped them to review and reconsider their understanding of themselves and their life choices and what further support they might need.

Research limitations/implications

Interviews were not completed by an independent interviewer. Experience of working with offender manager supervision additionally available throughout the sentence was not explored.

Practical implications

What is included in the MHTR information and support needs to be informed by the service user’s perspective, including this can improve engagement.

Social implications

Therapy was seen as a “a cog in the machine” and wider social inequalities may need to be addressed within the sentence.

Originality/value

This report focusses on experience of a therapeutic intervention – a key part of a community sentence with an MHTR.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 November 2013

Lauren Munro, Robb Travers, Alex St. John, Kate Klein, Heather Hunter, David Brennan and Chavisa Brett

This study sought to gain a better understanding of the general life experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) newcomer youth, situated within the broader…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study sought to gain a better understanding of the general life experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) newcomer youth, situated within the broader context of their lives post-migration. The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of various forms of oppression experienced by LGBT newcomers and offers recommendations for transforming services to better serve the complex needs of this marginalized population.

Design/methodology/approach

The Teens Resisting Urban Trans/Homophobia (TRUTH) project was comprised of ten focus groups with 70 youth (aged 14-29) living in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). Another three focus groups were conducted with 13 GTA service providers and teachers working with LGBT youth, in addition to one key informant interview. For this paper, the authors drew from a subset of the data including four newcomer-specific focus groups in which there were 39 youth who identified as refugees or immigrants, as well as key informant interviews with four youth (three of whom also participated in focus groups) and one service provider. Participants were asked about “what homophobia and transphobia meant to them”, “where they experienced it”, “in what forms”, and “how it impacted their daily lives”.

Findings

The experiences of LGBT newcomer youth in this study involved a complex negotiation of multiple systems of oppression. Youth described experiences of homophobia and racism within interpersonal relationships, in the LGBT community, in their respective diasporic communities, in social service encounters and during the immigration/refugee process. Barriers for LGBT refugee youth included difficulties finding work and accessing health care, as well as the additional burden of proving their sexual orientation during refugee claimant hearings.

Research limitations/implications

While the combination of focus groups and key informant interviews is a strength in this study, it also presents challenges for analysis. In focus groups, it is not always clear who is speaking; because of this, the authors were sometimes unable to differentiate between refugee and immigrant youth (or those without status) in our focus groups, making it often unclear which perspective or experience youth were speaking to. Another limitation was the dominance of the “cisgender gay male voice” in our conclusions. Lesbian and bisexual women were present in fewer numbers and the sample only included three trans youth.

Practical implications

The findings reveal systemic discrimination on the basis of race and sexual orientation that illuminate injustices within Canadian society and systems that can enhance the efforts of those working in policy and service environments. Focused anti-homophobia and anti-racism training, and the implementation of policies designed to enhance accessibility, could improve service provision for newcomer LGBT youth. Furthermore, in order to facilitate a more just settlement process, a broader understanding of sexual identity, gender identity, and gender expression is required of the refugee claimant system.

Originality/value

This study examines the experiences of youth in a large and complex, multicultural, and gay-friendly urban centre, thus providing timely and current data about the well-being of newcomer LGBT youth. As such, it is one of the first studies to offer some insights into the life issues and challenges post-migration of Canadian LGBT newcomer youth.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Valeda Frances Dent

To provide background on how the Kitengesa Community Library in rural Uganda, which serves as both a community library and a school library, might be seen as a model for other…

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Abstract

Purpose

To provide background on how the Kitengesa Community Library in rural Uganda, which serves as both a community library and a school library, might be seen as a model for other similar libraries in developing countries. To use a case study of the library to highlight certain characteristics of rural libraries as developed by B.J. Mostert and presented in his 1998 article.

Design/methodology/approach

The information in the article comes from a two‐year study of the Kitengesa Community Library. The methodology included focus groups, interviews, door‐to‐door visits, questionnaires, examination of library circulation information, and many hours of observation. Information from the study was then used to support the comparison to Mostert's characteristics of the rural community library. A review of the professional literature is also provided.

Findings

Findings indicate that the Kitengesa Community Library is a successful working model that might be used in other similar rural villages to serve both schools and the community. Implications of the findings are discussed in detail.

Research limitations/implications

Future research might include the impact of the library on the achievement of students, and the impact of the library on the teaching and learning practices of users.

Practical implications

The information presented in this paper offers some basic considerations in terms of the implementation of rural library services. Provision of such services is becoming increasingly important as more and more of the world's population becomes literate, and more of the world's attention is focused on the welfare of those living on the African continent.

Originality/value

The study itself is unique in that the data hail from a two‐year study of a small village library. Literacy is a major factor in terms of development in underdeveloped nations, and libraries have the potential to play an important role in the eradication of illiteracy, and provision of services for the “newly literate”.

Details

New Library World, vol. 107 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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