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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2011

Krista Hoffmeister, Konstantin P. Cigularov, Julie Sampson, John C. Rosecrance and Peter Y. Chen

The present study aims to provide a perspective on effective mentoring in the construction industry by examining key mentor characteristics as perceived by construction…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to provide a perspective on effective mentoring in the construction industry by examining key mentor characteristics as perceived by construction professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 170 union construction workers rated 55 mentor characteristics based on to what extent each was characteristic of a superior, average, or poor mentor.

Findings

To identify the most important mentor characteristics, three criteria were relied on: means of characteristic ratings of a superior mentor; effect sizes of mean differences between ratings of poor and superior mentors; and correlations between characteristic ratings of superior mentors and satisfaction with mentors. Significant mean differences were found between characteristics of poor and average mentors as well as between poor and superior mentors.

Research limitations/implications

Possible future directions include an investigation of the relationship between competent mentors and personal characteristics, and potential health and safety outcomes resulting from effective mentoring in the construction industry.

Originality/value

Although mentoring has been the focus of much research, the mentoring relationship is quite different in the construction industry and little mentoring research has targeted this industry. To develop an effective mentoring program in this industry, one of the initial steps is to identify characteristics of effective mentors in this industry.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Benjamin R. Kaufman and, Konstantin P. Cigularov, Peter Chen, Krista Hoffmeister, Alyssa M. Gibbons and Stefanie K. Johnson

The purpose of this paper is to examine the main and interactive effects of general and safety-specific leader justice (SSLJ) (i.e. fair treatment) and leader support for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the main and interactive effects of general and safety-specific leader justice (SSLJ) (i.e. fair treatment) and leader support for safety (LSS) on safety performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Two independent samples of construction workers rate their leaders with regards to fair treatment and support for safety and report their own safety performance in a survey.

Findings

In both studies, LSS significantly moderated relationships of both general and SSLJ with safety performance. In Study 1, the strength of relationship between general leader justice and safety performance increases while LSS is increased. Similar pattern was found for the relationship between SSLJ and safety performance in Study 2.

Practical implications

Safety interventions targeting leadership should consider training for leader safety practices that are perceived as supportive and fair.

Originality/value

The research is unique in its examination of leader justice in a safety-specific context and its interactive effects with LSS on safety performance. The present research helps to extend the reach of organizational justice theory's nomological network to include safety.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

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