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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2010

Howard Kahn, Joanna E. Stevenson and Robin Roslender

The purpose of this paper is to report and discuss the principal findings of a recent study of thinking and practice about workforce health and wellbeing among UK…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report and discuss the principal findings of a recent study of thinking and practice about workforce health and wellbeing among UK accounting and finance and human resource management professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

The data informing the paper were collected using postal questionnaires to two samples of 1,000 UK accounting and finance and human resource directors. The research design incorporated the facility for a full second mailing to respondents.

Findings

The responses received from the sample of human resource directors were generally more supportive of viewing workforce health and wellbeing as a valuable organisational asset. Accounting and finance professionals employed in private sector organisations were the least enthusiastic about such issues.

Research limitations/implications

While the design of the questionnaire afforded the opportunity for commentary on answers by respondents, semi‐structured interviews will allow a more detailed exploration of the issues.

Practical implications

The UK accountancy profession has yet to fully appreciate the significance of the intellectual capital phenomenon. In seeking to engage health and wellbeing issues, it may be desirable to consider collaboration with the human resource management profession.

Originality/value

Health and wellbeing have seldom been recognised as key constituents of human capital. Consequently, this is the first such study to be carried out.

Details

Journal of Human Resource Costing & Accounting, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1401-338X

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Jennifer K. Dimoff, E. Kevin Kelloway and Aleka M. MacLellan

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the literature assessing the return-on-investment (ROI) of healthy workplace programs.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the literature assessing the return-on-investment (ROI) of healthy workplace programs.

Design/methodology/approach

Used a narrative review to summarize and evaluate findings.

Findings

Although substantial ROI data now exist, methodological and logical weaknesses limit the conclusions that can be drawn.

Practical implications

A strategy for monetizing the benefits of healthy workplaces that draws on both human resource accounting and strategic human resource management is described.

Social implications

The promotion of healthy workplaces is an important goal in its own right. To the extent that ROI estimates are important in advancing this goal, these estimates should be based on clear logic and strong methodology.

Originality/value

The paper suggests the need for stronger research designs but also note the difficulties in monetizing outcomes of the healthy workplace.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Andrew Smith and Michael Pitt

This paper aims to examine the role of sustainable buildings in providing healthy workplaces in physical and perceptual terms.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the role of sustainable buildings in providing healthy workplaces in physical and perceptual terms.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of a literature review, considering the history of sustainable development in the built environment and its rationale, then widening the scope to consider sustainable, healthy and productive workplaces.

Findings

Sustainable construction has focused on environmental sustainability but this may have contributed to improved health, satisfaction and wellbeing amongst building users. Sick building syndrome and poor indoor air are contributory factors to ill health and reduced productivity but this paper suggests that sustainable building practices will reduce these effects, improving the quality of buildings for their occupants.

Practical implications

This paper argues that building performance measures need to take account of people factors such as employee perceptions and also that the design of workplaces should be regarded as a strategy for productivity enhancement. Management issues should be considered in the design of workplaces. The paper concludes that further research is required into the role of sustainable construction in providing healthy buildings.

Originality/value

The paper makes practical suggestions for corporate real estate and facilities management teams as well as those involved in the design of the buildings. Additionally, it opens suggested avenues for further academic research.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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Article
Publication date: 9 June 2020

Inga Jona Jonsdottir, Gudbjorg Linda Rafnsdottir and Thorhildur Ólafsdóttir

The purpose of this paper is to further the understanding of public sector line managers' work-related well-being and health in relation to job strain, gender and

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to further the understanding of public sector line managers' work-related well-being and health in relation to job strain, gender and workplace social support.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was sent to all senior and middle line managers (N = 357) in three administrative departments of Iceland's largest municipality. The response rate was 64.7%. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyse the data.

Findings

A minority of respondents experience high job strain. However, for these managers, the risk of experiencing emotional exhaustion is about fivefold, compared to those not experiencing high job strain. Social support is an important buffering against job strain and enhances well-being. Female managers are more likely than their male counterparts to report myositis, back or shoulder pain and sleeping difficulty.

Practical implications

The study emphasises that workplace social support attenuates the negative impact of job strain on line managers' work-related well-being. Furthermore, it demonstrates that in a society at the forefront in gender equality, gender differences in health symptoms exist among line managers in the public sector – a finding that highlights the importance of studying all aspects of workplace well-being by gender. This calls for future research using a more comprehensive survey data and interviews to shed light on the pathways through which female line managers' health is negatively affected.

Originality/value

Knowledge relating to well-being and health of line managers in the public sector is scarce. This study contributes to filling that gap. As work-related well-being is often gender-blind, the value of the study is also the investigation of the gender patterns in the authors’ data.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Benjamin R. Kaufman and, Konstantin P. Cigularov, Peter Chen, Krista Hoffmeister, Alyssa M. Gibbons and Stefanie K. Johnson

The purpose of this paper is to examine the main and interactive effects of general and safety-specific leader justice (SSLJ) (i.e. fair treatment) and leader support for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the main and interactive effects of general and safety-specific leader justice (SSLJ) (i.e. fair treatment) and leader support for safety (LSS) on safety performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Two independent samples of construction workers rate their leaders with regards to fair treatment and support for safety and report their own safety performance in a survey.

Findings

In both studies, LSS significantly moderated relationships of both general and SSLJ with safety performance. In Study 1, the strength of relationship between general leader justice and safety performance increases while LSS is increased. Similar pattern was found for the relationship between SSLJ and safety performance in Study 2.

Practical implications

Safety interventions targeting leadership should consider training for leader safety practices that are perceived as supportive and fair.

Originality/value

The research is unique in its examination of leader justice in a safety-specific context and its interactive effects with LSS on safety performance. The present research helps to extend the reach of organizational justice theory's nomological network to include safety.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Antonino Callea, Flavio Urbini, Paula Benevene, Michela Cortini, Lisa Di Lemma and Michael West

The aim of this paper is to present the Italian version of the Aston Team Performance Inventory (the ATPI), to assess its psychometric properties and whether its factor…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to present the Italian version of the Aston Team Performance Inventory (the ATPI), to assess its psychometric properties and whether its factor structure reflects the input-process-output (I-P-O) model.

Design/methodology/approach

The ATPI was administered to 702 Italian employees working in teams, recruited from the National Health Service (50.3 percent) and from public and private organizations (49.7 percent). To assess the psychometric properties of the ATPI's items, evaluation of discriminating power was performed. In addition to the reliability analyses, a confirmatory factor analysis of the full I-P-O model was also conducted.

Findings

Significant results of the Italian version of the ATPI arise from the psychometric properties, dimensions and factor structure. Results align with the English version of the inventory.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was limited and was not selected randomly. Future research should, therefore, expand the sample size and involve several types of Italian organizations. Considering these significant results, future research should validate the Italian version of the ATPI.

Originality/value

To the authors' knowledge, the Italian literature is missing instruments for the assessment of team performance in organizations. Consequently, the present study provides evidence of the value of the Italian version of the ATPI.

Details

Team Performance Management, vol. 20 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2012

Antonino Callea, Flavio Urbini and Delaney Bucknor

The purpose of this paper was to establish whether precariousness of life as determined by temporary employment contributed to anxiety and depression and whether its…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to establish whether precariousness of life as determined by temporary employment contributed to anxiety and depression and whether its consequences on daily life were differentiated in relation to gender.

Design/methodology/approach

A structural equation analysis of anxiety and depression with aspects of precariousness of life as model predictors was explored with t‐test and correlation analyses used to explore gender differences in the study variables.

Findings

The structural equation model produced strong evidence to suggest that precariousness of life was a significant predictor of both anxiety and depression. Women reported significantly higher scores than men on distrust toward the professional future and the emotional consequences on everyday life, anxiety and depression. As hypothesized, the negative consequences of temporary work in personal and family life appear more evident in women.

Practical implications

The results suggest that organizations should promote training courses on coping strategies to prevent the negative impact of precariousness of life aspects on anxiety and depression.

Originality/value

This study provides evidence supporting that temporary employment contributes to health consequences, which apply differently by gender. The study broadens understanding of temporary work management especially in regards to its health impact on female temporary workers. Furthermore, the Precariousness of Life Inventory has demonstrated an ability to tap into the latent factors of precariousness of life, revealing important gender differences and an ability to contribute to anxiety and depression.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2010

Mikael Holmgren Caicedo, Maria Mårtensson and Robin Roslender

The purpose of this paper is to identify the case for taking employee health and wellbeing into account in some way and to consider a range of objections that might be…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the case for taking employee health and wellbeing into account in some way and to consider a range of objections that might be raised against such exercises.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper identifies the existence of a persistent sickness absence as a cause for concern for a range of stakeholders and how it might be accounted for in the light of recent developments within the intellectual capital field. Attention then turns to some of the difficulties such well meaning interventions might encounter, and briefly considers how a self‐accounting approach might in some part overcome these.

Findings

The paper finds that a programme of empirical research within the field of employee health and wellbeing is now required to ensure that employee health and wellbeing into account.

Practical implications

While predominantly a discursive contribution to the literature, the paper incorporates some discussion of innovative accounting interventions.

Originality/value

In contrast to viewing sickness absence from a cost perspective, the paper encourages stakeholders to embrace a wider spectrum of ways of seeing to better understand employee health and wellbeing issues in the work place.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Connie Zheng, John Molineux, Soheila Mirshekary and Simona Scarparo

Work-life balance (WLB) is an issue of focus for organisations and individuals because individuals benefit from having better health and wellbeing when they have WLB and

Abstract

Purpose

Work-life balance (WLB) is an issue of focus for organisations and individuals because individuals benefit from having better health and wellbeing when they have WLB and this, in turn, impacts on organisational productivity and performance. The purpose of this paper is to explore relevant WLB factors contributing to employee health and wellbeing, and to understand the interactive effects of individual WLB strategies and organisational WLB policies/programmes on improving employee health and wellbeing.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the data collected from 700 employees located in Queensland, Australia, multiple regression analysis was conducted to examine the variables related to individual WLB strategies and organisational WLB programmes. Several multiple regression models were used to evaluate interrelated relationships among these variables and their combined effects on employee health and wellbeing.

Findings

The authors found that employees exercising their own WLB strategies showed better health conditions and wellbeing that those who do not; they were also more capable of achieving WLB. Both availability and usage of organisational WLB programmes were found to help employees reduce their stress levels, but interestingly to have no direct association with WLB and employee health. Several control variables such as age, working hours, education level and household incomes were found to have moderate effects on employee health and wellbeing.

Originality/value

Employee health and wellbeing are determined by multiple factors. In distinguishing from prior research in this field, this study discovers an important interface between individual WLB strategies and organisational provision of WLB policies/programmes supplemented by several exogenous factors in addressing overall employee health and wellbeing. The results have implications for organisational delivery of WLB policies and other human resource management practices to support employees.

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Mark Butler, Michael Savic, David William Best, Victoria Manning, Katherine L. Mills and Dan I. Lubman

The purpose of this paper is to examine the strategies utilised to facilitate the wellbeing of workers of an alcohol and other drug (AOD) therapeutic community (TC)

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the strategies utilised to facilitate the wellbeing of workers of an alcohol and other drug (AOD) therapeutic community (TC)

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports on the findings of a qualitative study that involved in-depth interviews with 11 workers from an Australian AOD TC organisation that provides both a residential TC program and an outreach program. Interviews were analysed using thematic analysis

Findings

Three main interconnected themes emerged through analysis of the data: the challenges of working in an AOD TC organisation, including vicarious trauma, the isolation and safety of outreach workers and a lack of connection between teams; individual strategies for coping and facilitating wellbeing, such as family, friend and partner support and self-care practices; organisational facilitators of worker wellbeing, including staff supervision, employment conditions and the ability to communicate openly about stress. The analysis also revealed cross-cutting themes including the unique challenges and wellbeing support needs of outreach and lived experience workers.

Research limitations/implications

Rather than just preventing burnout, AOD TC organisations can also play a role in facilitating worker wellbeing.

Practical implications

This paper discusses a number of practical suggestions and indicates that additional strategies targeted at “at risk” teams or groups of workers may be needed alongside organisation-wide strategies.

Originality/value

This paper provides a novel and in-depth analysis of strategies to facilitate TC worker wellbeing and has implications for TC staff, managers and researchers.

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

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