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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2023

Steven Barnes, Jerome Carson and Kevin Gournay

Evidence suggests supported living can improve functioning and reduce need. However, its lack of a clear definition has presented significant challenges to establishing a…

Abstract

Purpose

Evidence suggests supported living can improve functioning and reduce need. However, its lack of a clear definition has presented significant challenges to establishing a definitive evaluation of its efficacy. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of a defined model of supported living using in terms of reductions made to aspects of clinical and social recovery.

Design/methodology/approach

A naturalistic, non-controlled assessment was conducting using using the Camberwell Assessment of Need Clinical Scale with a sample of adults with severe and enduring mental illness residing with a UK-based mental health company at 1 of 12 UK locations.

Findings

Analysis regarding preliminary outcomes relating to health and social need is presented with comparison between admission and six-months post-admission (N = 90). Additional analysis relating to outcomes at 12 months is also provided (N = 39). Significant outcomes are noted at both timepoints in terms of reducing unmet need and levels of formal and informal help given/required during tenancy.

Practical implications

The findings support that, even in the absence of clinical recovery, opportunities exist to make meaningful and valuable improvements to unmet need and functional independence, with implications for clinical practice in the context of supported living.

Originality/value

The findings provide encouraging early indications of the benefits of the model in making meaningful reductions to functional and psychological needs in individuals with severe and enduring mental illness.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 20 February 2017

Kevin Joseph Gournay

620

Abstract

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Kevin Gournay

This article sets out to provide information regarding the evidence base for psychological treatments and to demonstrate that the number of mental health professionals who are…

Abstract

This article sets out to provide information regarding the evidence base for psychological treatments and to demonstrate that the number of mental health professionals who are available and competent to deliver these treatments is very small compared with the numbers of people who might benefit. The article also considers the prevalence of conditions that are amenable to psychological treatment and then explores how ‘stepped care’ may be one solution for providing available treatment resources in a way that is fairest and most effective for the population at large.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 5 June 2023

Jan Macfarlane and Jerome Carson

Abstract

Details

Positive Psychology for Healthcare Professionals: A Toolkit for Improving Wellbeing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-957-4

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Kevin Gournay

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Joe Curran, Paul Lawson, Simon Houghton and Kevin Gournay

Behavioural activation is a contemporary behavioural treatment for depression that has the potential advantages of being more readily adopted in psychiatric inpatient environments…

315

Abstract

Behavioural activation is a contemporary behavioural treatment for depression that has the potential advantages of being more readily adopted in psychiatric inpatient environments than more complex psychological treatment approaches and requiring less intensive training than these approaches. In this article the theoretical and empirical foundations of behavioural activation are described along with an outline of the therapeutic process and key interventions used. Consideration is then given to factors influencing the implementation of BA in psychiatric inpatient environments.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 May 2009

Andy Young and James Turner

Managing violence is an important clinical and managerial responsibility within contemporary mental health practice and there have been considerable developments across the…

Abstract

Managing violence is an important clinical and managerial responsibility within contemporary mental health practice and there have been considerable developments across the country to pave the way for a more ‘standardised’ approach to conflict resolution. Many trusts employ someone to lead on ‘conflict resolution’ but the precise nature of the lead role and the responsibility attached to it vary greatly between organisations. Similarly, some trusts have sophisticated systems for delivering and monitoring conflict training and updates, whereas others do not. The project described here sought to clarify how training for conflict resolution is organised within a sample of mental health trusts in England. Data was generated by questionnaire and telephone interview with trust leads, and the audit findings were then analysed and used to inform an inter‐professional training pilot in one local trust. It is now expected that frontline staff will enter into conflict resolution training as defined by the NHS Security Management Service (2004) and be trained in accordance with a national syllabus of training standards. Audited opinion suggests that the training co‐ordinator role is associated with improved governance in relation to conflict‐resolution training. Arguably, if national benchmarks and standards are to be met in relation to conflict resolution, trusts need to invest in training infrastructure and at least consider the merits of funding a dedicated co‐ordinator role and inter‐professional training.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2009

Paul Barrett

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Article
Publication date: 22 March 2023

Freda Gonot-Schoupinsky, Mark Weeks and Jerome Carson

The purpose of this opinion piece is to present a case for the potential of positive autoethnography (PosAE) as a new autoethnographic approach.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this opinion piece is to present a case for the potential of positive autoethnography (PosAE) as a new autoethnographic approach.

Design/methodology/approach

This work resulted from on-going discussions between the authors as to the practicalities and benefits of associating the qualitative approach of autoethnography with the field of positive psychology.

Findings

PosAE is proposed to encourage writers to actively reflect on the importance for themselves, and their readers, of including positive narrative elements, prospective visions and exploratory trajectories in their work.

Research limitations/implications

This research builds on existing research that has included positive psychology in autoethnography. As positive psychology is grounded in empirical research, the authors are suggesting that PosAE is allied to pragmatic autoethnography.

Practical implications

PosAE offers to facilitate positive thought, affect and strategies that could improve well-being. For example, some people struggling with serious health issues, and those helping them, may find it useful for articulating conditions and envisioning, even experiencing, positive change.

Social implications

With so many lives impacted by mental health issues globally, and with rapidly changing societies struggling to provide stability and purpose, an autoethnography that provides tools such as PERMA (Positive emotions, Engagement, Positive Relationships, Meaning, Accomplishments/Achievements) to communicate the positive seems timely.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first time the creation of an autoethnographic approach explicitly linked to positive psychology has been proposed.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

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