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1 – 10 of over 19000
Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Caroline J. Easton

This study aims to evaluate differences between substance dependent men who were arrested for intimate partner violence (IPV) with and without concurrent psychiatric problems.

297

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate differences between substance dependent men who were arrested for intimate partner violence (IPV) with and without concurrent psychiatric problems.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 63 participants were randomly assigned to manual‐guided group behavioral therapies (cognitive behavioral therapy for substance dependent domestic violence offenders (SADV) or drug counseling (DC)) and assessed across 12 weeks of treatment.

Findings

Despite excluding psychotic disorders and bipolar disorders at baseline, 23 percent of clients reported prior mental health treatment. SADV participants with co‐occurring mental health were different than SADV participants without co‐occurring mental health symptoms on both baseline and post‐treatment time periods. SADV participants with co‐occurring mental health symptoms had more pre‐treatment impairments, more drug use during treatment, a trend for more problems with aggressive behaviors throughout treatment and significantly more impairments in anger control subscales at post treatment compared to SADV participants without co‐occurring mental health symptoms.

Practical implications

The findings suggest the need to target and treat co‐occurring psychiatric symptoms and distress among SADV offenders. Perhaps offering clients targeted behavioral or pharmacotherapy adjunctive treatments can help improve treatment outcomes among substance dependent offenders of IPV when mental health problems are present.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to evaluate differences between substance dependent men arrested for IPV with and without concurrent psychiatric problems. It shows that men who are violent toward their partners tend to have a co‐occurring problem with addiction, yet little is known about differences between substance dependent male offenders who have dual mental health problems.

Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2004

Anthony T. Lo Sasso, Richard C. Lindrooth and Ithai Z. Lurie

The role of gender in psychiatric disorders is not well understood, but several broad trends are known: while men and women experience psychiatric symptoms at roughly the…

Abstract

The role of gender in psychiatric disorders is not well understood, but several broad trends are known: while men and women experience psychiatric symptoms at roughly the same rate, women are more likely to experience depressive symptoms (Kessler et al., 1993) and men are more likely to experience substance use disorders (DHHS, 1999). However, women are more likely to use primary care services for mental health care than are men (Wells et al., 1986). Equally controversial and not well understood has been the differential responses to treatment interventions by gender (Kornstein, 1997). One recent study found that a depression intervention was more cost-effective for women than for men (Pyne et al., in press). Indeed, the study found that the intervention was essentially cost and outcome neutral for men, while women were found to have a cost-effectiveness ratio of over $5000 for each QALY saved.

Details

The Economics of Gender and Mental Illness
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-111-8

Article
Publication date: 5 May 2021

Lamia Haque and Robert Rosenheck

While many studies have shown that liver diseases (LD) can be caused or exacerbated by substance use disorders (SUD), few have examined the proportion of adults with LD…

Abstract

Purpose

While many studies have shown that liver diseases (LD) can be caused or exacerbated by substance use disorders (SUD), few have examined the proportion of adults with LD and SUD who receive mental health and addiction treatment or correlates of such use.

Design/methodology/approach

Using national Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 data from the United States Veterans Health Administration (VHA), the authors studied all 43,246 veterans diagnosed with both LD and SUD in FY 2012 and compared those who received mental health treatment (n = 30,456; 70.4%) to those who did not (n = 12,790; 29.6%).

Findings

Veterans who received mental health treatment were less like to be older than 75 years of age, more likely to have served during recent Middle East conflicts (Operation Iraqi Freedom or Operation Enduring Freedom), more likely to have been recently homeless and to have drug dependence as contrasted with alcohol dependence when compared with those who did not receive mental health treatment. Although the majority, 70.4%, received mental health treatment, only 30.6% of the total received specialized addiction treatment, and these veterans were more likely to experience homelessness and have drug dependence diagnoses.

Originality/value

This is the first study as per the authors’ best knowledge that broadly examines mental health and addiction treatment received by veterans with LD and SUD. High rates of mental health treatment in this population likely reflect the integrated nature of the VHA and its emphasis on providing comprehensive services to homeless veterans. Further research is needed to identify barriers to specialized addiction treatment in this population.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2018

Clive G. Long, Olga Dolley and Clive Hollin

In the UK, the mental health treatment requirement (MHTR) order for offenders on probation has been underused. A MHTR service was established to assess the effectiveness…

Abstract

Purpose

In the UK, the mental health treatment requirement (MHTR) order for offenders on probation has been underused. A MHTR service was established to assess the effectiveness of a partnership between a probation service, a link worker charity and an independent mental healthcare provider. Short-term structured cognitive behavioural interventions were delivered by psychology graduates with relevant work experience and training. Training for the judiciary on the MHTR and the new service led to a significant increase in the use of MHTR orders. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 56 (of 76 MHTR offenders) completed treatment in the first 12 months. A single cohort pre-post follow-up design was used to evaluate change in the following domains: mental health and wellbeing; coping skills; social adjustment; and criminal justice outcomes. Mental health treatment interventions were delivered under supervision by two psychology graduates who had relevant work experience and who were trained in short term, structured, cognitive behavioural (CBT) interventions.

Findings

Clinically significant changes were obtained on measures of anxiety and depression, and on measures of social problem solving, emotional regulation and self-efficacy. Ratings of work and social adjustment and pre-post ratings of dynamic criminogenic risk factors also improved. This new initiative has addressed the moral argument for equality of access to mental health services for offenders given a community order.

Originality/value

While the current initiative represents one of a number of models designed to increase the collaboration between the criminal justice and the mental health systems, this is the first within the UK to deliver a therapeutic response at the point of sentencing for offenders with mental health problems. The significant increase in the provision of MHTR community orders in the first year of the project has been associated with a decrease in the number of psychiatric reports requested that are time consuming and do not lead to a rapid treatment.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 21 October 2008

Ashley A. Dunham, Teresa L. Scheid and William P. Brandon

This chapter explores how primary care physicians deliver mental health treatment for Medicaid patients in one county in the United States, and how treatment may have…

Abstract

This chapter explores how primary care physicians deliver mental health treatment for Medicaid patients in one county in the United States, and how treatment may have changed after HMO enrollment with a mental health carve-out. We utilize Lipsky's theory of street-level bureaucracy to better understand how primary care physicians treat Medicaid patients for depression and what types of insurance arrangements support or inhibit that treatment. Exploratory interviews with 20 physicians revealed that the patient's status as a non-voluntary client, service system barriers and physicians’ commitment to treatment caused them to bear primary responsibility for the majority of depression care. Physicians were willing to act as advocates for their clients and viewed such advocacy as ethical given the lack of mental health parity. In general, primary care physicians were not familiar with new policies dictating mental health carve-outs for Medicaid patients, nor were they concerned with how mental health care was reimbursed for their patients. However, they were willing to provide mental health care even if they were not reimbursed. Physicians rely upon medication management to treat depression, and reimbursement plays a role in the amount of time spent with patients and in the coding used for the visit. Lipsky's (1980) theory of street-level bureaucracy provides a useful framework for understanding how physicians will act as advocates for their clients in the face of structural as well as resource constraints on health care.

Details

Care for Major Health Problems and Population Health Concerns: Impacts on Patients, Providers and Policy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-160-2

Book part
Publication date: 28 December 2006

Tracy J. Pinkard and Leonard Bickman

Two major reform movements have shaped child and adolescent mental health services over the past quarter-century: the Systems of Care movement, and more recently, the…

Abstract

Two major reform movements have shaped child and adolescent mental health services over the past quarter-century: the Systems of Care movement, and more recently, the movement toward evidence-based practice. Results from several studies indicate that youth served in traditional residential or inpatient care may experience difficulty re-entering their natural environments, or were released into physically and emotionally unsafe homes (Bruns & Burchard, 2000; President's Commission on Mental Health, 1978; Stortz, 2000; Stroul & Friedman, 1986; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1999). The cost of hospitalizing youth also became a policy concern (Henggeler et al., 1999b; Kielser, 1993; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1999). For example, it is estimated that from the late 1980s through 1990 inpatient treatment consumed nearly half of all expenditures for child and adolescent mental health care although the services were found not to be very effective (Burns, 1991; Burns & Friedman, 1990). More recent analyses indicate that at least 1/3 of all mental health expenditures for youth are associated with inpatient hospitalization (Ringel & Sturm, 2001).

Details

Research on Community-Based Mental Health Services for Children and Adolescents
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-416-4

Book part
Publication date: 15 September 2014

Marta B. Rodríguez-Galán and Luis M. Falcón

To examine aging Puerto Ricans’ experiences with and perceptions of depression treatment.

Abstract

Purpose

To examine aging Puerto Ricans’ experiences with and perceptions of depression treatment.

Methodology/approach

In-depth analysis of eight exemplary cases from ethnographic interviews with a subsample of 16 aging Puerto Ricans in the Boston area who are part of the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study.

Findings

The results show that respondents were resistant to accepting pharmacological treatment for their depression, and they often characterized antidepressants as “dope.” Moreover, they claimed that in addition to their health problems, social stressors such as financial strain, lack of jobs, housing problems, and social isolation are triggering or contributing to their depression. Because of this, they express reluctance in accepting clinical treatment only, and suggest that broader social issues and other health needs ought to be addressed as part of an effective treatment. For many, pharmacological treatment is acceptable only in the more severe forms of depression.

Research limitations/implications

These results have important implications for improving the quality of depression treatment and reducing health disparities for mainland Puerto Ricans.

Originality/value of chapter

Even though recent studies continue to show a high frequency of depression among Puerto Ricans, issues of treatment quality are still understudied and ethnographic accounts are especially lacking. Our study offers an exploratory investigation of this unresolved research issue.

Details

Technology, Communication, Disparities and Government Options in Health and Health Care Services
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-645-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 April 2018

Pernille Pinderup

Studies have shown that mental health professionals find working with patients with dual diagnosis challenging, and the purpose of this paper is to examine some of these…

1268

Abstract

Purpose

Studies have shown that mental health professionals find working with patients with dual diagnosis challenging, and the purpose of this paper is to examine some of these challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 85 mental health professionals from 8 different mental health centres in Denmark were interviewed. The data analysis was inspired by a grounded theory approach.

Findings

Different challenges in the dual diagnosis treatment were identified and they suggested that the focus of treatment was mainly on the mental illness rather than the substance use disorder. The single focus of the treatment made it challenging to treat patients with dual diagnosis sufficiently. While several studies explain the single focus by inadequate competencies among professionals, the present study suggests that the single focus is also explained by the way that the treatment is organised. For instance, standardized treatment packages and insufficient guidelines on substance abuse treatment make it challenging to treat patients with dual diagnosis.

Originality/value

This paper suggests that a more flexible, and a longer period of, treatment, together with more sufficient guidelines on dual diagnosis treatment and a more formalized collaboration with the substance abuse treatment centres, will make it a less challenging issue to treat patients with dual diagnosis.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Erik Bulten, Annelies Vissers and Karel Oei

Mental health care in prisons involves many stakeholders. As a consequence, the goals involved are divergent but there is no sound theoretical framework that accounts for…

Abstract

Mental health care in prisons involves many stakeholders. As a consequence, the goals involved are divergent but there is no sound theoretical framework that accounts for the complexity of care in prison. This paper considers a broad theory and its conceptual framework that differentiates between prisoners with emotional suffering and those without, the need for care from an objective point of view as opposed to a subjective one, and the need for care related to mental health problems versus care related to limiting recidivism.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Nicole K. Lee, Angela M. Harney and Amy E. Pennay

The aim of this paper is to examine the temporal sequencing of methamphetamine use and the onset of mental health problems among a sample of dependent methamphetamine users.

421

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine the temporal sequencing of methamphetamine use and the onset of mental health problems among a sample of dependent methamphetamine users.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a self‐reported timeline method to examine the sequencing of first use, regular use and problematic use of methamphetamine and mental health issues among 126 users with lifetime dependence.

Findings

The majority of the sample (69 per cent) reported previous mental health diagnosis or treatment. Of this sample, 22 per cent reported mental health problems prior to their first use of methamphetamine and 72 per cent reported mental health problems after first use of methamphetamine (with the rest around the same time or unsure). On the timeline, mental health symptoms were first indicated around a year after first regular use of methamphetamine and around the same time as problematic use. Respondents identified a lag time of five years between first problematic use of methamphetamine and seeking treatment for methamphetamine‐related problems, but those that received mental health treatment engaged in methamphetamine treatment earlier.

Practical implications

Among this sample, mental health problems coincided with problematic methamphetamine use (rather than any use) suggesting prevention efforts may be better directed at preventing transition to heavy use or use of potent forms or injecting, rather than directed at prevention of uptake. On this basis, stepped care might be appropriate for methamphetamine users.

Originality/value

Despite a substantial research literature establishing the link between methamphetamine use and mental health problems, little is known about the order of onset and the implications of this for treatment. This is one of the few studies specifically investigating the temporal sequencing of methamphetamine use, mental health symptoms and treatment seeking among a sample of dependent methamphetamine users.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

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