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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2018

Keri Hoy, Sarah Parsons and Hanna Kovshoff

The primary to secondary school transition can have a significant and long-lasting impact on young people. Autistic children are particularly vulnerable to negative transition…

2012

Abstract

Purpose

The primary to secondary school transition can have a significant and long-lasting impact on young people. Autistic children are particularly vulnerable to negative transition experiences; however, there is a lack of research examining effective practices and provision for these pupils. This case study involves a mainstream secondary school in the South of England, which has a dedicated Learning Support base. The purpose of this paper is to collect qualitative data on experiences of the primary to secondary school transition from multiple stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

A photovoice activity followed by a semi-structured interview was conducted with five autistic pupils aged 12–16 years; semi-structured interviews were also carried out with six parents and four teachers.

Findings

Five key themes emerged from the data in relation to effective practices: inclusion, child-centred approach, familiarisation, visual supports and communication and consistency.

Research limitations/implications

As a small-scale case study, there are limitations regarding generalisation. However, this research illuminates transition practices that are experienced as effective by autistic children, their families and teachers.

Practical implications

Practical implications related to each of these themes are highlighted. These implications are important in the context of the mandatory responsibilities of schools in England to include the voices of children and young people with special educational needs in decisions about their education.

Originality/value

The findings challenge a rights-based approach to inclusion and illustrate the importance of a needs-based approach which appropriately recognises and understands what autism means for children, their families and the teachers who support them.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

John Guthrie, Anna Guthrie, Rob Lawson and Alan Cameron

This paper seeks to explore the rationale for, and development of, farmers' markets in New Zealand. The paper is based on and extends previous industry reports.

6172

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to explore the rationale for, and development of, farmers' markets in New Zealand. The paper is based on and extends previous industry reports.

Design/methodology/approach

The research in this paper is viewed in the context of the dominance of globalised business in the food production and retailing process. Semi‐structured interviews and case studies were used to elicit the opinions, perceptions and attitudes of market managers, producers/growers, and customers.

Findings

It was found in the paper that farmers' markets provide additional outlets for entrepreneurial small‐scale farmers and producers, alternatives for consumers, and opportunities for communities, while their rapid growth is presenting challenges for some large competitors.

Originality/value

The paper finds that farmers' markets may be an important harbinger of the second industrial revolution where there is renewed respect for those small‐scale producers who meet the needs of discerning consumers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 108 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 January 2021

Halil Zaim, Veland Ramadani, Sait Revda Dinibutun, Shqipe Gërguri-Rashiti and Dina Sabry Said

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of knowledge management (KM) processes on human resource management’s (HRM’s) performance in family-owned organizations…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of knowledge management (KM) processes on human resource management’s (HRM’s) performance in family-owned organizations. Therefore, a model is proposed to explain the core processes of KM and their effects on HRM's performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A field study is conducted based on data collected from family-owned companies in Turkey. The survey instrument is a self-administered questionnaire composed of 36 questions in total. There are three demographic questions, 18 questions aim to investigate KM processes and 15 questions aim to investigate HRM practices.

Findings

The results show that KM processes have significant positive relationships with HRM performance. Among the processes of KM, knowledge generation (KG) is found to have the most significant effect. This study shows that KM processes are enhancing HRM performance in family-owned organizations.

Research limitations/implications

First of all, it is conducted on family-owned companies. Hence, the results may change based on types of organizations. Second, convenience sampling was used in data collection. The majority of data were collected through HRM departments who were available, reliable and easy to access. Despite many advantages of this sampling technique on major disadvantage is lacking clear generalizability. For this reason, it is presumed that HRM awareness is high in the selected participants. Different sampling methods may lead to different results. Thus, for future research, it would be useful to make cross-cultural and cross-sectorial studies to compare the business cultures and to find more accurate outcomes related to KM and HRM implementations.

Originality/value

Nowadays, most of the family-owned companies are well aware of the statement that both KM and HRM have significant positive impacts on organizational outcomes. This research's findings indicate that KM processes enhance HRM performance in family-owned organizations. Therefore, family-owned organizations should pay more attention on KM processes and the linkage between KM and HRM in order to obtain better HRM results.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

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