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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2007

Ling Li and Michael E. Roloff

Compensation influences applicants' perceptions of a position's attractiveness, but there has been limited analysis of how different compensation systems might reflect…

Abstract

Purpose

Compensation influences applicants' perceptions of a position's attractiveness, but there has been limited analysis of how different compensation systems might reflect organizational cultures and influence organizational attractiveness. This article seeks to explore these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

An experiment was conducted in which 288 undergraduates reacted to scenarios describing a company that distributed salaries and benefits based on either merit or on seniority. Individual differences were also measured and analyzed. Analysis of variance and moderated regression were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Relative to seniority‐based compensation systems, the cultures of organizations relying on merit were perceived to be more aggressive, reward‐oriented, and less decisive. Unexpectedly, the psychological contracts of organizations using merit systems were generally perceived to be more relational and less transactional than those using seniority‐based systems. Individual differences were not related to attraction to the organization regardless of its compensation systems. Finally, individuals were least attracted to organizations that distributed both salaries and benefits based on seniority relative to those using a mixed compensation distribution system or one based entirely on merit.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was composed of undergraduates who responded to a hypothetical job scenario. The scenario only included information about how salary and benefits are allocated. Future research should use more experienced samples that are considering actual positions.

Practical implications

Findings indicate how information about compensation systems might be used in job descriptions to encourage applicants.

Originality/value

This study was the first to find that merit/seniority‐based compensation systems for determining salary and benefits reflect different organizational cultures to job applicants and influence job applicants' attraction to organizations.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2017

Francesca Mochi, Rita Bissola and Barbara Imperatori

This chapter explores different strategies implemented by three companies using professional (LinkedIn) and non-professional (Facebook) social networking websites (SNWs…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter explores different strategies implemented by three companies using professional (LinkedIn) and non-professional (Facebook) social networking websites (SNWs) as a recruitment tool and investigates the influence of their perceived usability and attractiveness on job seekers’ attraction and their intention to apply.

Methodology/approach

First, a laboratory experiment involving 171 MBA students compares the effectiveness of three different social recruitment strategies. Second, a survey among 110 job seekers focuses on the most effective strategy in terms of attraction as an employer and the influence of perceived usability and attractiveness of professional SNW pages on job seekers’ intention to pursue the job.

Findings

The laboratory experiment confirms the key role of LinkedIn as an e-recruitment practice. The survey shows that the overall company image, the usability of the LinkedIn page and the interaction between the attractiveness of the page and the overall company image positively influence job seekers’ intention to pursue the job.

Social implications

The research offers insights on job seekers’ reactions to 2.0 Internet-based recruitment. Companies should focus on and invest in professional social medias, paying attention to the usability of their SNWs pages.

Originality/value of the chapter

Recruitment is a strategic HRM practice to attract talents; however, research lags behind practice and little is known about job seekers’ perceptions and reactions to Internet recruitment. This chapter sheds light on the use of social media for recruitment and identifies two features that contribute to an effective e-recruitment strategy.

Details

Electronic HRM in the Smart Era
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-315-9

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Keon-Hyung Ahn and Pil Joon Kim

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the importance of independence principle of refund guarantees (RGs) and how to make the best of an arbitration clause in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the importance of independence principle of refund guarantees (RGs) and how to make the best of an arbitration clause in the guarantees so that a Korean shipbuilder, a guarantor and an export credit agency (ECA) may possibly protect themselves from buyers’ unlawful demand.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper firstly introduces a brief elucidation about RG and the concept of independence principle. By way of presenting factual backgrounds, legal and policy evaluation and analyses, this paper covered all issues and disputes arising out of one shipbuilding contract and the independent RG drawn from the shipbuilding contract, through in-depth cases studies of a judicial case on the matter of independence principle of RG between the beneficiary (the buyer or its assignee) and the guarantor reviewed by an English court, an arbitration case regarding whether the beneficiary (the buyer or its assignee) has any right of refund in the event of the acceptance of a repudiatory breach by the applicant (the builder) in the London Maritime Arbitrators Association, and the beneficiary (the buyer or its assignee)’s appeal to an English court against the award and a judicial case reviewing whether the guarantor has right of reimbursement in accordance with the terms of the export bond insurance with the Korean ECA.

Findings

While most RGs, in practice, are drawn as an independent guarantee which is payable on call without any evidence of default, there is another payment scheme in RGs, such as payment upon the submission of an arbitral award which may enhance the application of RGs in shipbuilding contracts. The paper suggested that under these circumstances, Korean builders may opt to make their shipbuilding contract be governed by Korean laws, with the Korean Commercial Arbitration Board as a competent arbitral jurisdiction and forum as far as possible.

Originality/value

This paper proposes prudent approaches and considerations in the issuance and application of RGs which are independent from shipbuilding contracts. The hope is to increase awareness in the utility of arbitration system as well as for fiduciary Korean banks and ECAs to play a more pivotal role in guiding shipbuilding industry stakeholders.

Details

Journal of Korea Trade, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1229-828X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 December 2016

Keon-Hyung Ahn and Pil-Joon Kim

The purpose of this paper is to utilize the concept of arbitration by subrogation as a means to increase recoveries of indemnities paid out to exporters or any financial…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to utilize the concept of arbitration by subrogation as a means to increase recoveries of indemnities paid out to exporters or any financial institutions by K-SURE, an export credit agency of Korea, against possible non-payment or breach of obligations from the buyer or the buyer’s country. It looks into the possibility of K-SURE and KCAB reactivating its 2004 MOU to give more jurisdictional protection to K-SURE’s indemnities recovery transactions.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper first introduces a brief elucidation about export insurance provided by K-SURE and the necessity of arbitration in the export insurance, and a summary of a subrogation arbitration case referred to the KCAB by K-SURE in 2005. Cognizant of the 2004 MOU between K-SURE and KCAB, as well as the foreign and domestic developments in arbitration, the paper then analyzes legal principles of subrogation by insurer, as well as domestic and overseas precedents on the matters of assignment of claim and arbitration by subrogation.

Findings

While it appears that there is still no universally recognized authority nor established court precedents applying arbitration by subrogation, the authors discovered that similar to Korea, most of leading courts in the world have consistently held that the assignee can request and be requested for arbitration pursuant to the arbitration agreement contained in the assigned contract. The paper concludes that the K-SURE now can be admitted as a party having proper standing in the arbitration proceedings so long as the specific claim right under the contract which includes the arbitration agreement is assigned to the K-SURE.

Originality/value

This paper suggests a possible plan to increase recoveries in export insurance. The outcome of the research is expected to enhance the arbitration system on the back of increasing numbers of arbitration related to export insurance, to improve the balance sheet of K-SURE and ultimately, to help the Korean economy by collecting export insurance recoveries which will lead to saving Korean people’s tax.

Details

Journal of Korea Trade, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1229-828X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Keon Bong Lee and Suk Bong Choi

The purpose of this paper is to explore when and how Korean firms learn from internationalization to develop new competencies to serve an international market.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore when and how Korean firms learn from internationalization to develop new competencies to serve an international market.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a contingency perspective to examine the relationship between organizational coordination and organizational implementation capabilities. A conceptual framework was tested based on data obtained from Korean firms.

Findings

The results suggested a discrepancy between the direct and indirect influences of internationalization. On the one hand, there is an inverted U-shaped pattern in the direct relationship between internationalization and organizational implementation capabilities; that is, high levels of internationalization may reduce organizational implementation capabilities. On the other hand, the evidence for a U-shaped moderation suggests that high levels of internationalization can help a firm become capable of amplifying the value of cross-functional coordination in organizational implementation capabilities. In addition, technological changes weaken the positive impact of organizational coordination on organizational implementation capabilities.

Research limitations/implications

Empirical research on the role of internationalization and dynamic environments in the context of new product development (NPD) affirms the importance of testing the curvilinear moderation beyond a linear two-way interaction.

Practical implications

The present study offers insights into the importance of high levels of internationalization in enabling Korean firms to create effective cross-functional coordination to serve an international market with new products.

Originality/value

This is the first review focusing on the role of internationalization in NPD.

Details

Journal of Korea Trade, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1229-828X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2018

Vincent K. Chong and Nurul Farhana Khudzir

This chapter examines the effect of mutual monitoring and the personality trait of need for achievement on subordinates’ budgetary-slack creation in a team-based…

Abstract

This chapter examines the effect of mutual monitoring and the personality trait of need for achievement on subordinates’ budgetary-slack creation in a team-based environment. Experimental results show that the creation of budgetary slack is lower when mutual monitoring is present than when it is absent. The results also show that a two-way interaction between mutual monitoring and the personality trait of need for achievement affects subordinates’ budgetary-slack creation.

Details

Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-543-2

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Hwanwoo Lee, Steve Werner and Tae-Yeol Kim

The purpose of this paper is to test the effect of human resource systems on organization attraction. Furthermore, the authors theorize and test how the vocational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the effect of human resource systems on organization attraction. Furthermore, the authors theorize and test how the vocational interests of prospective employees can serve as boundary conditions that affect the relationship between high-performance work systems (HPWS) and organization attraction.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve these ends, this study conducts a scenario-based experiment with prospective employees to examine the effects of HPWS and vocational interests on organization attraction.

Findings

The authors demonstrated that HPWS is an important feature for organization attraction. Despite the generally positive linkage between HPWS and organization attraction, the most important implication of the findings is that job applicants also have an important role in responding to the features being used by a firm to attract applicants through HPWS. For example, potential job applicants with higher (rather than lower) social vocational interests are more likely to be attracted to the HPWS of firms.

Research limitations/implications

This study has limitations that must be considered. In particular, the authors treated HPWS as a unidimensional construct. Given the study design, it is unclear whether the attraction effects are driven by HPWS as a whole or whether they are being driven by any single or multiple component(s) of the system. Future research needs to consider examining how specific practices are matched with specific vocational interests by using multiple scenarios where they bundle different high-performance work practices. Doing so would further the understanding of which specific practices affect attraction and for whom.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the authors’ knowledge of the effects of HPWS on organization attraction. In addition, job applicants’ social vocational interest plays an important role in strengthening the relationship between HPWS and organization attraction.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2018

Hyungjin Lukas Kim and Jinyoung Han

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on employees’ compliance behavior concerning information security policy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on employees’ compliance behavior concerning information security policy (ISP). A research model includes CSR activities as an antecedent of ISP compliance and as a mediator of the relationship between ISP compliance intention and the perceived costs of compliance.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 162 respondents were surveyed from organizations with more than 500 employees. This study used partial least squares (SmartPLS 3.0) to analyze and examine hypotheses.

Findings

The results show CSR’s influence as a mediator in the context of ISP compliance. In particular, moral CSR can affect employees’ ISP compliance intention positively and fully mediate the relationship between the costs of compliance and ISP compliance intention. Employees would like to comply with ISP when they recognize the benefits of ISP compliance and the costs of ISP noncompliance.

Originality/value

This study examines influential factors on ISP compliance considering cost-benefit factors from rational choice theory. Moreover, the study contributes to ISP compliance research by being the first attempt to consider CSR in an ISP compliance research context. The results provide insights on how to strategically implement CSR activities in terms of organizational information security.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

Bülend Terzioğlu, Elsie Chan and Peter Schmidt

The aim of this paper is to review 73 survey articles relating to information technology outsourcing (ITO) published by 17 information technology journals over the 20‐year…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to review 73 survey articles relating to information technology outsourcing (ITO) published by 17 information technology journals over the 20‐year period 1991‐2010. The review focuses on seven attributes of survey methodology (i.e. information on research questions, pilot testing of the survey instrument, sampling method employed, sample size, response rate, nonresponse bias and internal validity) and ascertains the extent to which those attributes have been addressed. The main purpose of this study is to provide insights for researchers to help improve the data quality, and reliability of survey results.

Design/methodology/approach

Review of literature over the past 20 years (1991‐2010).

Findings

There is strong evidence that deficiencies in the administration of survey methods in ITO persist and that such shortcomings compromise rigour, and therefore need to be redressed.

Practical implications

Although this review is performed in an ITO context, findings are of interest and benefit to all survey researchers. The key contribution of this paper is that it provides up‐to‐date evidence regarding quality of survey research as it applies to ITO by identifying areas needing attention so that the integrity of survey research methodology can be maintained and it can continue to provide reliable findings for the advancement of knowledge.

Originality/value

This study provides an examination of literature dealing exclusively with an IT outsourcing survey. It can, however, serve as a guide for all survey researchers regarding the pitfalls in survey methodology.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Sean Valentine, David Hollingworth and Bradley Eidsness

There is reason to believe that an ethically minded approach to hiring and the development of an ethical context should be associated with incremental decreases in…

Abstract

Purpose

There is reason to believe that an ethically minded approach to hiring and the development of an ethical context should be associated with incremental decreases in employees’ perceptions of ethical conflict. It is also likely that the selection of ethical employees, and the reduced ethical conflict that follows, are positively related to employees’ positive work attitudes. The purpose of this paper is to test these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a self-report questionnaire, information was collected from 187 employees working for a medium-sized financial services organization with offices located primarily in the Midwestern USA.

Findings

Results of structural equation modeling indicated that employees’ perceptions of ethics-related selection were negatively related to perceived ethical conflict, and that reduced ethical conflict and enhanced ethics-related selection were associated with an increased positive work attitude, which was comprised of job satisfaction, an intention to stay, and organizational commitment.

Research limitations/implications

The results cannot prove causal association between the constructs, and the use of one focal firm limits generalizability.

Practical implications

Organizational leaders and HR professionals should develop ethics-based hiring practices to reduce ethical conflict and strengthen a company's ethical context.

Originality/value

This investigation is relevant because strong relationships among ethics-related hiring, ethical conflict, and positive work attitudes would suggest that companies must use ethical selection criteria and maintain an ethical culture/climate that meets or exceeds employees’ expectations about ethics. Furthermore, this study adds to the relatively few published works exploring the relationship between ethical conflict and work attitudes.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 43 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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