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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2022

K.V. Ansab and S. Pavan Kumar

Electric cars have very little market share in developing countries despite their environmental benefits. Thus, governments have started promoting electric cars by…

Abstract

Purpose

Electric cars have very little market share in developing countries despite their environmental benefits. Thus, governments have started promoting electric cars by providing financial incentives to consumers. The current article aims to examine the direct and indirect effects of government financial incentives on consumer electric car adoption in India.

Design/methodology/approach

The study followed a quantitative research method that employed a self-administered survey questionnaire. Structural Equation Modelling and Multi-Group Analysis were followed for data analysis.

Findings

The study revealed that financial incentives have an indirect effect on electric car adoption intention rather than a direct effect. In addition, financial incentives were found to have a direct effect on attitude and Perceived Behavioural Control (PBC). Attitude and PBC positively influenced consumer adoption intention.

Practical implications

The insights and implications from the present study would help policymakers and marketers to formulate better incentive policies and market strategies to increase consumer acceptance of electric cars in developing countries.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the literature by analysing the underlying mechanism that links government financial incentives to electric car adoption intention. This study also explored the direct effect of financial incentives on attitude and PBC, which are less investigated in electric vehicle literature. In addition, the present article also assessed the moderating role of age in electric car adoption, which has mixed evidence in the literature, and such studies are scarce in the Indian context.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Shriniwas Gautam, Antonio L. Acedo Jr, Pepijn Schreinemachers and Bhishma P. Subedi

The purpose of this paper is to develop a straightforward method to quantify volume and value of postharvest losses in the tomato postharvest value chain in Nepal and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a straightforward method to quantify volume and value of postharvest losses in the tomato postharvest value chain in Nepal and estimate the monetary loss shouldered by value chain actors.

Design/methodology/approach

The study combines interview data to quantify volume and prices with produce sampling to quantify quality losses, and does this at four nodes of the tomato value chain in Nepal: farmers, collectors, wholesalers, and retailers to estimate volume and value of postharvest losses.

Findings

Almost one-fourth of the total tomato harvest weight that enters the value chain is lost before it reaches consumers, and other one-fifth is traded by the value chain actors at reduced price due to quality damage. The total volume of postharvest loss (weight and quality loss) is not the same for all value chain actors and the average monetary loss ranges from 4 percent of gross revenues for farmers to 12 percent for wholesalers.

Practical implications

A standard method to account for both physical weight losses and quality losses of horticultural produce is lacking in estimates of the monetary value of postharvest losses for horticultural crops. Knowing such losses is essential for postharvest technology generation, promotion, and adoption. This study provides a framework that can be adopted and improved in future loss assessment studies for estimating the volume and value of postharvest losses in a horticultural value chain.

Originality/value

The uniqueness of the method used in this study is that it combines interview data to estimate price and volume with produce sampling to quantify quality losses, and does this at four nodes of the value chain: farmers, collectors, wholesalers, and retailers. This method could become a standard approach for assessment of postharvest weight and quality losses and to estimate the monetary value of total postharvest losses in the value chain for horticultural crops.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2020

Murniati Mukhlisin and Mohamed Fadzly

This paper aims to examine the existence of multiple institutional logics among a number of organisations within the international Islamic financial architecture (IIFA…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the existence of multiple institutional logics among a number of organisations within the international Islamic financial architecture (IIFA) whose main purpose is to promote and support the development of Islamic financial institutions (IFIs) across the globe and how IIFA relates to the role of Islamic financial reporting standards.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors review websites of 11 IIFA’s constituent organisations and undertake 7 in-depth, semi-structured interviews with senior members of a selection of these organisations to identify the dominant logics by which their role and (inter)action within the IIFA are shaped.

Findings

The study findings reveal evidence of competing (and shifting) logics and political interests that seem to have led to contradictions and inconsistencies among the constituent organisations. The authors explain this by proposing a framework consisting of religion logic, market logic and corporate logic that intertwines with the underlying economic system and acts as sources of identity–legitimacy–authority for the respective organisations.

Originality/value

The authors bring to light some key issues that may pose a threat to the sustained existence of IFIs. The authors adapt the institutional logic framework and incorporate it into religion logic within the context of Islam (i.e. hifdzul-din as the first Maqasid ul-Shari’ah), resulting in some fresh theoretical perspective that may inform future research.

Details

Accounting Research Journal, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1030-9616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1998

Khaled M. Abu‐Zeid

Many countries all over the world are facing water shortages. As population increases, water is being perceived as a very valuable resource. Every effort is exerted to use…

5007

Abstract

Many countries all over the world are facing water shortages. As population increases, water is being perceived as a very valuable resource. Every effort is exerted to use water more efficiently and to make use of every drop of water to ensure the well being of future generations. New trends are developed and practiced in the area of water resources use and water saving. These trends vary from one country to another according to the degree of water scarcity, economic situations, and other factors. Developing non‐conventional water resources is an example of the recent trends in developing new water resources and water savings. Unlike rainfall, rivers, and groundwater which are considered conventional freshwater resources, the non‐conventional water resources include sea water desalination, agriculture wastewater reuse, and municipal wastewater reuse. This paper deals with the reuse of agriculture, municipal, and industrial wastewater as a new trend in developing additional water resources. Special interest is given to municipal wastewater, its characteristics and necessary treatment. Environmental and human health considerations for wastewater reuse, especially in agriculture, are also discussed. Possible consequences of wastewater reuse are introduced. Examples of wastewater reuse practices in some countries are also mentioned.

Details

Environmental Management and Health, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-6163

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 November 2020

Murniati Mukhlisin

This study aims to measure levels of Sharīʿah-compliance in Islamic financial institutions (IFIs) financial reporting standards with the objective to investigate the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to measure levels of Sharīʿah-compliance in Islamic financial institutions (IFIs) financial reporting standards with the objective to investigate the application of Maqāsid ul-Sharīʿah as a compliance measure reflected in the reporting standards.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts Maqāsid ul-Sharīʿah’s model to measure levels of Sharīʿah-compliance amongst three available financial reporting frameworks and presentation standards; international financial reporting standards (IFRS), accounting and auditing organization for Islamic financial institutions (AAOIFI), Pernyataan Standar Akuntansi Keuangan (PSAK) Syariah. NVivo 10 software is used in this paper to help measure quantitatively the compliance level of each standard.

Findings

The findings suggest that the use of Maqāsid ul-Sharīʿah leads to a more complete understanding of how the meaning of Sharīʿah and its values can be integrated into the demands of financial reporting, and hence, offering greater convergence between ethics and accounting regulations amongst IFIs.

Originality/value

It documents different context of content analysis that takes examples of Islamic financial reporting studies and uses both classical and contemporary theoretical bases. The main outputs are designed for standard setters and policymakers with expectation for Sharīʿah objectives (i.e. Maqāsid ul-Sharīʿah), to be embedded in the preparation of financial reporting standards for the IFIs. Hence, they will be able to show their full accountability then gain better trust from the stakeholders.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 January 2020

Rahma Wijayanti, Vera Diyanty and Sugiyarti Fatma Laela

This study aims to provide empirical evidence on the contingency factors that affect the implementation of education strategies and the impact of education strategy misfit…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide empirical evidence on the contingency factors that affect the implementation of education strategies and the impact of education strategy misfit on the performance and effectiveness of the board’s moderating role on the misfit level and performance of Islamic banks.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is a quantitative study with pooled ordinary least square panel data during the years 2007-2014 from all Indonesian Islamic commercial banks. Islamic bank performances are measured by the level of profitability and sharia financial performance. Board effectiveness is analysed by measuring the effectiveness of both the board of commissioners (BoC) and the sharia supervisory board (SSB).

Findings

This study proves that organisational competent qualities and chief executive officer tenure are the contingency factors that affect the implementation of the education strategy. This study’s results indicate that the effectiveness of both the BoC and SSB has a positive impact on the bank’s profitability and sharia financial performance. The results also show that misfit has a negative effect on sharia financial performance and that board effectiveness is proved to reduce the negative impact of a misfit on sharia financial performance. However, there is no strong evidence that board effectiveness reduces the negative impact of a misfit on profitability.

Originality/value

This study emphasises the importance of enhancing the competence and innovation of organisations in the implementation of education strategy and the need for synergy and increased capabilities among board members to achieve well-established Islamic bank performance.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 September 2013

Darwish Almoharby and Mark Neal

This study aims to clarify current thinking about Islamic leadership by returning to the original texts of Islam, the Qur'an and the hadith. These are analysed to identify…

1879

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to clarify current thinking about Islamic leadership by returning to the original texts of Islam, the Qur'an and the hadith. These are analysed to identify foundational Islamic leadership prototypes, concepts and ideas. In so doing, the article provides original analysis of the foundations of Islamic leadership, so as to inform current debates about leadership in Islamic regions and communities.

Design/methodology/approach

The study consists of content analysis of the Qur'an and the hadith, to identify key concepts within these texts, concerning the nature of leadership. The methodological aim is to develop characterisations of Islamic leadership prototypes that are recognisable to practising Muslims today. In order to ensure this, the content analyses have been presented to academic seminar groups and conferences and refined through subsequent discussions.

Findings

Islamic leadership does not rely for its legitimacy upon traditional authority, but rather on rational-legal systems based on unity of purpose, acknowledgement of the one God, and the foundational example of Prophet Muhammad, whose referent and charismatic authority lives on in discussions of the sunnah and the hadith. It is thus vital to refine external or “etic” characterisations of Islamic leadership with an appreciation of leadership prototypes in the Qur'an, the sunnah and hadith.

Research limitations/implications

The scope of this study is limited by the subject matter, the investigation of leadership prototypes in the Qur'an and the hadith. This means that the consideration of historically more recent Islamic thinking about leadership has been left to subsequent study.

Practical implications

Implications for subsequent researchers are the need for critical clarity in discussions of “Islamic” or “Muslim” leadership. Another significant implication comes with the recognition of the overwhelming importance of the Prophet Muhammad's life and sayings in laying the parameters for the subsequent Muslim discussions of leadership.

Originality/value

This is the first use of content analysis to examine the foundational leadership prototypes and concepts embedded in the Qur'an and the hadith, and thus to analyse the Prophet Muhammad as a referent and charismatic leader, whose life set the parameters for the subsequent understanding of Islamic leadership.

Details

Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, vol. 6 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-7983

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Nurul Syazwani Mohd Noor, Muhammad Hakimi Mohd. Shafiai and Abdul Ghafar Ismail

This paper aims to propose a derivation of Shariah risk from both the Islamic finance theory and theory of contracts in Islamic law. Specifically, it deliberates the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a derivation of Shariah risk from both the Islamic finance theory and theory of contracts in Islamic law. Specifically, it deliberates the derivation of Shariah risk following the contracts validity and apprises the readers of the Shariah risk issues currently under debate.

Design/methodology/approach

This study reviews the relevant literature and presents an analysis of contract rulings through evidence derived from the Qur’an, Hadith and other secondary sources of Islamic law. Various theories of Islamic finance and Islamic law of contracts are identified, to examine the general principles and essential elements and conditions of a valid contract.

Findings

This analysis asserts that any circumstances that may render invalidity of the contract will trigger Shariah risk. More importantly, this paper highlights the implications of invalid contracts, based on the opinion of Hanafi jurists, who concluded that Shariah risk may be derived from any void or voidable contracts due to the failure of the contractual parties to comply with Shariah contractual obligations.

Research limitations/implications

This paper emphasises the derivation of Shariah risk over theoretical approaches. It does not include an explanation in the form of any empirical model.

Originality/value

This is the first study that contributes to the field of derivation of Shariah risk, based on the theory from the Islamic law of contracts.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

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