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1 – 10 of 39
Article
Publication date: 17 August 2021

Julie Beadle-Brown

The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on Banks et al. and sets the wider context.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on Banks et al. and sets the wider context.

Design/methodology/approach

It provides a brief narrative review of the literature on the factors that determine the quality of life of people with intellectual disabilities, including the impact of culture.

Findings

Key to ensuring good quality of life outcomes is support that is facilitative, enabling and empowering which can compensate for severity of disability and improve people’s experiences. This approach is called Active Support. Improving quality of life is a key part of preventing and responding to behaviours that challenge. Culture is an important factor in ensuring staff are motivated to work in such ways but is likely to be intertwined with many other factors.

Originality/value

This paper summarises the key literature on what is needed to improve outcomes for people with intellectual disabilities. It introduces the importance of exploring how the different dimensions of culture interact and how culture, practice, processes and structures might work in a much more complex and intertwined fashion than previously conceptualised.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Kitty Stewart, Jill Bradshaw and Julie Beadle-Brown

The purpose of this paper is to establish the effectiveness of Talking Mats® (TM) in evaluating service users’ experiences, and explore their views of the implementation of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish the effectiveness of Talking Mats® (TM) in evaluating service users’ experiences, and explore their views of the implementation of person-centred active support (PCAS).

Design/methodology/approach

This is a mixed-methods study, employing qualitative interviewing and observational measures.

Findings

Both qualitative and quantitative measures indicated inconsistent implementation of PCAS. It was possible to effectively gain participants’ views on positive and negative aspects of quality of support and quality of life, using TM, across three themes, My life, My support and Self-determination.

Research limitations/implications

Generalisability of the research may be limited due to the sample, and the potential for researcher and interviewer bias is acknowledged.

Practical implications

TM provides a mechanism that may facilitate the inclusion of the views and experiences of people with intellectual and developmental disability (PWIDD) who have limited verbal skills. Their views need to be reflected in adaptions made to PCAS.

Originality/value

This study included a population who are often left out of qualitative research because of the methodologies adopted. It also included older PWIDD, where there has been less research about the effectiveness of TM.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 August 2019

Julie Beadle-Brown and Jill Bradshaw

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the difficulties highlighted by Ntinas around supporting change in services for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the difficulties highlighted by Ntinas around supporting change in services for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

This commentary examines what is needed for change and reflects on staff culture.

Findings

The authors propose that it is not sensible to separate the culture of a service from the implementation of person-centred approaches and attempt to map how the concepts overlap and are interconnected.

Originality/value

Whilst some elements of culture are clearly important in order to start the process of change, other elements will change as an intervention is introduced and embedded.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 May 2023

Nathan Keates and Julie Beadle-Brown

Previous studies have confirmed the potential benefits of participating in theatrical improvisation, including improved mental health, well-being, skills and strategy development…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous studies have confirmed the potential benefits of participating in theatrical improvisation, including improved mental health, well-being, skills and strategy development. This study aims to explore the experiences of improv (a subset of theatrical improvisation) for autistic, non-autistic, yet neurodivergent and neurotypical people. In particular, it explores whether participants believe that there have been any benefits from participating in improv.

Design/methodology/approach

Twenty adult participants were recruited using snowball sampling. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) and qualitative content analysis (QCA). IPA explored the autistic lived experience during improv participation, while QCA sought to identify the benefits gained.

Findings

Implementing IPA allowed for the benefits of improv to be embedded into autistic lived experience. This was aggregated into two themes: “life beyond improv” and “social worlds negative impact”. Findings from QCA found five themes: “creativity and opportunities: the arts and workplace”; “acceptance, cognitive flexibility and rolling with it”; “interpersonal, social and communication skills and human connection”; “gains in mental health, quality of life and wellbeing”; and for just autistic participants, “‘I've gone full autistic’ (and can learn why neurotypicals are like they are)”.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is a novel study area that has not been investigated previously.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Julie Beadle‐Brown

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 July 2011

Julie Beadle-Brown

834

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Julie Beadle‐Brown, Aislinn Hutchinson and Beckie Whelton

Engagement in meaningful active and relationships is important for quality of life but, for those with intellectual and developmental disabilities, engagement depends on the…

Abstract

Engagement in meaningful active and relationships is important for quality of life but, for those with intellectual and developmental disabilities, engagement depends on the quality of support received from those around them. This paper describes the process of implementing person‐centred active support in the Avenues Trust, and the findings from the evaluation of the implementation in six pilot residential services. Attention was paid both to training staff and to the motivational structures within the organisation. Both the quality of support provided by staff and the level of engagement increased significantly after the introduction of person‐centred active support. In addition, people experienced decreased self‐stimulatory and injurious behaviour, increased opportunities for choice and control, and higher levels of participation in tasks of daily living, without compromising their community involvement. Staff experienced more and better practice leadership, and staff morale improved within the services, with staff generally more positive about management, more satisfied and less likely to leave. Lessons learnt about the implementation are provided.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Jim Mansell and Julie Beadle‐Brown

Grouping people with learning disabilities and challenging behaviour in residential care has been the focus of several recent research studies. This paper describes these studies…

Abstract

Grouping people with learning disabilities and challenging behaviour in residential care has been the focus of several recent research studies. This paper describes these studies and what they found. In general, they show negative effects of grouping people with challenging behaviour together in terms of the quality of staff interaction with them and the outcomes they experience.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Julie Beadle‐Brown

This mainly conceptual paper summarises the current conceptualisation of personalisation as it applies to people with learning disabilities. It goes on to map out how the drive…

1858

Abstract

This mainly conceptual paper summarises the current conceptualisation of personalisation as it applies to people with learning disabilities. It goes on to map out how the drive towards the personalisation of services, its most recent iterations of person‐centred planning, person‐centred funding and person‐centred action, contributes to a better quality of life for people with intellectual disabilities, using the domains and indicators of quality of life set out in the Schalock et al (2002) international consensus. In doing so it describes what you would see in services where person‐centred approaches were being successfully implemented.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Article
Publication date: 15 July 2011

Rachel Roberts, Julie Beadle‐Brown and Darran Youell

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the issue of social inclusion for people with autism spectrum conditions.

2414

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the issue of social inclusion for people with autism spectrum conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on current policy and good practice guidelines as well as the experience of people with autism and those who support them, this paper considers how well legislation, policy, and good practice are currently implemented with regard to improving the social inclusion of children and adults with autism spectrum conditions.

Findings

International and UK policy sets out the rights of children and adults with disabilities to live a good life in the community, with reasonable adjustment to be made by society to ensure this is possible. However, the practical and strategic implementations of policies to ensure these rights for people with autism are still not fully in place.

Originality/value

This discussion takes into consideration the views of carers and support professionals and the direct experiences of those with autism as well as policy and published guidance.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

1 – 10 of 39