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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

C. Joe Ueng, Donald W. Wells and Juliana D. Lilly

Prior research has investigated determinants of CEO compensation. However, that research has been primarily limited to large firms. This study investigates the impact of CEO…

2099

Abstract

Prior research has investigated determinants of CEO compensation. However, that research has been primarily limited to large firms. This study investigates the impact of CEO influence over the board of directors on CEO pay for both large and small firms. Additionally, other determinants of CEO pay for both large and small firms are examined. Results suggest that CEO influence over the board significantly affects CEO pay for large firms. However, we do not find the same evidence for small firms. Firm size is the prinmary factor of CEO pay for small firms. Evidence in this study suggests that CEO pay of large firms is mostly a function of CEO influence over the board, firm size and firm performance.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Juliana D. Lilly, Jo Ann Duffy and Meghna Virick

The purpose of this study is to study gender differences in the relationship between McClelland's needs, stress, and turnover intentions with work‐family conflict.

5605

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to study gender differences in the relationship between McClelland's needs, stress, and turnover intentions with work‐family conflict.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 383 individuals representing 15 different industries. Multiple regression analysis was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Results suggest that McClelland's needs act as an antecedent of work‐family conflict, and that they have a differential impact on work‐family conflict for women and men.

Research limitations/implications

The subjects were college graduates, hence it was a self‐selected sample, and the results may not generalise to other populations.

Practical implications

Women are more affected by family obligations than men and this may impact the performance and turnover intentions of women in organisations.

Originality/value

This paper enhances understanding of work‐family conflict by specifically examining individual differences such as need for power, need for achievement and need for affiliation and evaluating their impact on turnover intention and job tension.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 21 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2007

Meghna Virick, Juliana D. Lilly and Wendy J. Casper

The purpose of this research is to examine how increased work overload of layoff survivors relates to their work‐life balance and job and life satisfaction.

4678

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine how increased work overload of layoff survivors relates to their work‐life balance and job and life satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey methodology was used to collect data from 510 layoff survivors in a high tech company. Regression analyses and structural equation modeling were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The study found that layoff survivors experience higher levels of workload which impact overall role overload that negatively affects work‐life balance. Findings suggest that high workloads experienced by layoff survivors contribute to reduced job and life satisfaction through reduced work‐life balance as a mediating mechanism.

Research limitations/implications

The data used in this paper is cross‐sectional and conducted within a single organization. Also, most of the data is obtained from self report survey data and subject to common method bias. As such, longitudinal studies are recommended for future research.

Originality/value

This study makes a contribution by joining two distinct research streams – the job loss literature with research on work‐family issues. Findings suggest that high workloads experienced by layoff survivors contribute to reduced job and life satisfaction with work‐life balance acting as a mediator. Future research should determine whether these findings generalize to diverse layoff survivors in distinct industries, and assess whether these phenomena change over time.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Juliana D. Lilly and Meghna Virick

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect that work locus of control has on perceptions of trust, perceived organizational support, procedural justice and interactional…

4496

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect that work locus of control has on perceptions of trust, perceived organizational support, procedural justice and interactional justice.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 679 alumni of a university in the Southwestern USA. Regression analyses and structural equation modeling were used to test a series of hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicate that work locus of control has a significant positive relationship on all variables. Perceived organizational support fully mediated the relationship between work locus of control and perceptions of both procedural and interactional justice. Organizational trust fully mediated the relationship between work locus of control and interactional justice, but only partially mediated the relationship between work locus of control and procedural justice.

Research limitations/implications

The data used in this paper are cross‐sectional. Also, results are based on self‐report survey data and subject to common method bias. As such, longitudinal studies are recommended for future research, as are finding antecedents to perceptions of justice that may help managers improve the way they communicate about decision‐making at work.

Originality/value

Findings from the study suggest the important role that personality plays as a precursor to justice perceptions in organizations.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 November 2019

Juliana Lilly

This paper aims to summarize the existing literature on workplace respect and to help explain how employees who feel excluded and disrespected at work may retaliate against the…

491

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to summarize the existing literature on workplace respect and to help explain how employees who feel excluded and disrespected at work may retaliate against the organization.

Design/methodology/approach

A thorough review of the literature was conducted. This review is prepared by an independent writer who adds her own impartial comments and places the studies in context.

Findings

Based on the findings of the studies reviewed, employees who feel disrespected at work may retaliate by complaining or withdrawing from work. The emotions and hurt feelings resulting from disrespectful behavior are often hard to articulate, and managers may not realize how hurtful their actions are to the employee. The paper offers suggestions on how organizations may reduce the potential damage by reflecting on their work environment that may be fueling employee negativity.

Originality/value

This briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 October 2020

Kamphol Wipawayangkool and Juliana Lilly

The purpose of this paper is to suggest ways to integrate human resources (HR) and information security management (ISM) within a firm to help reduce expensive and embarrassing…

200

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to suggest ways to integrate human resources (HR) and information security management (ISM) within a firm to help reduce expensive and embarrassing failures in information security breaches.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is written for the practitioners. It includes a general review of literature in information technology and HR to help explain ways to decrease the chance of ISM failures.

Findings

Employees often become careless about information security in the workplace, and the threat to corporate information systems is serious. Although security training is essential, a more comprehensive approach to addressing the security issue is needed. As human factors account for most security breaches, including HR personnel as a partner with IT may help address some of the weaknesses that training alone cannot resolve.

Originality/value

This paper discusses the human factors that cause information technology breaches and how combining HR practices and ISM may generate a competitive advantage for the organization. This paper then offers practical suggestions that HR may use to help with ISM issues.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 14 February 2020

Juliana Lilly

The purpose of this paper is to help readers better understand the psychological impact of employees feeling underutilized in the workplace.

Abstract

Theoretical basis

The purpose of this paper is to help readers better understand the psychological impact of employees feeling underutilized in the workplace.

Research methodology

The case is based on primary data collected from Jonathan and describes his actual experience in the workplace. Mark also provided input on the situation. Because Jonathan and Mark are still employed in the same institution, the names have been disguised to protect their identity.

Case overview/synopsis

Jonathan is a highly motivated and successful employee who was promoted into a position that had no real responsibility. His manager would not restructure the job to make it more challenging or rewarding, so after three years of frustration, Jonathan has to decide if he should keep trying to fix the job, coast until retirement or resign.

Complexity academic level

This case is applicable for undergraduate business courses in organizational behavior, principles of management, principles of human resource management or leadership.

Article
Publication date: 31 July 2023

Juliana Lilly, Kamphol Wipawayangkool, Meghna Virick and Ronald Roman

This study aims to investigate the effects of attribution of responsibility (AOR) for layoffs on the components of ethical decision-making. Internal, external and no-fault AOR…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the effects of attribution of responsibility (AOR) for layoffs on the components of ethical decision-making. Internal, external and no-fault AOR were examined using the model of moral intensity to determine if placement of blame for the layoff influences ethical awareness, judgment and intent.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveys were collected from 397 students. The survey provided a scenario about a layoff situation involving an African-American woman and a Caucasian woman. Respondents then answered questions about moral intensity, moral judgment and moral intent concerning the layoff and identified the reasons they believed the layoff occurred. We tested our hypotheses using multiple regression analysis.

Findings

Subjects were more likely to make a moral judgment about the situation when layoffs were blamed on the company’s actions (external AOR) and less likely to make a moral judgment when the layoff decision was blamed on employee performance (internal AOR) or on economic factors beyond anyone’s control (no-fault AOR). Results also indicate that layoffs blamed on employee performance negatively moderate the relationship between moral judgment and moral intent.

Originality/value

Previous studies of layoff ethics have not examined the influence of AOR for layoffs using the model of moral intensity. Thus, this paper extends the current understanding of these concepts in ethical decision-making.

Details

International Journal of Ethics and Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9369

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1949

It has often been said that a great part of the strength of Aslib lies in the fact that it brings together those whose experience has been gained in many widely differing fields…

Abstract

It has often been said that a great part of the strength of Aslib lies in the fact that it brings together those whose experience has been gained in many widely differing fields but who have a common interest in the means by which information may be collected and disseminated to the greatest advantage. Lists of its members have, therefore, a more than ordinary value since they present, in miniature, a cross‐section of institutions and individuals who share this special interest.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Joe Kavanaugh, Jo Ann Duffy and Juliana Lilly

The study aims to examine the association between job satisfaction and demographic variables, such as years in profession, of healthcare professionals in an in‐patient…

7965

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to examine the association between job satisfaction and demographic variables, such as years in profession, of healthcare professionals in an in‐patient rehabilitation hospital setting.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 128 employees were surveyed using a 47‐item opinion survey to assess demographic variables and overall job satisfaction, as well as nine facets of job satisfaction.

Findings

The findings indicate that years in profession (professional experience) is associated with job satisfaction in a defined pattern.

Research limitations/implications

These findings need to be tested in other professional groups where plateauing is common. The results are limited by the use of a convenience sample, relatively small sample size, some categorical data that restricted the forms of analysis, and the fact that only demographic variables were examined. The use of continuous measures and broadening the study to include other organizational variables and personal variables would provide more robust results.

Practical implications

The paper suggests a two‐tier program of coaching and mentoring to address issues in job motivation, which may lead to increased job satisfaction and retention of health care professionals.

Originality/value

Drawing from earlier literature, strategies such as mentoring and coaching are proposed for moderating the negative effect of plateauing on satisfaction. The value of the paper is the identification of a pattern in the motivation of plateaued employees and the application of previous findings about coaching and mentoring that may address issues of employee motivation and retention.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

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