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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2019

Fabian Hattke and Judith Hattke

The purpose of this paper is to propose that leaders who promote ethical values authentically will be more effective in inspiring followers to behave ethically than inauthentic…

1188

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose that leaders who promote ethical values authentically will be more effective in inspiring followers to behave ethically than inauthentic leaders. It further hypothesizes that authentic ethical inspiration by leaders will transform followers’ prosocial motivation so that they internalize their leader’s values and act accordingly.

Design/methodology/approach

The study tests this moderated-mediation model based on survey data from 741 officers in the Federal Armed Forces Germany who are leaders and follower simultaneously.

Findings

Leader authenticity moderates the relationship between leader ethical influence and follower ethical behaviors. The effect is significant and substantial. Leader ethical influence has a significant, yet marginal effect on follower prosocial motivation, which, in turn, strongly relates to follower ethical behaviors.

Research limitations/implications

Although leader authenticity is a value in itself, it says little about the contents of leaders’ ethical values. Thus, future research should not confound authentic leadership with ethical leadership. Prosocial motivation is a comparatively stable characteristic of individuals, which is rather resilient against leader influence.

Practical implications

“Softer” means of leader influence are effective in the coercive context of public command-and-control organizations. By cascading down the hierarchy, ethical values disseminate throughout the organization. The study draws these conclusions within the limitations of a cross-sectional analysis.

Originality/value

This study is the first to investigate the moderating role of perceived leader authenticity in the relationship between leader ethical inspiration and follower ethical behaviors.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 March 2022

Georg-Friedrich Göhler, Judith Hattke and Markus Göbel

This paper aims to determine whether prosocial motivation acts as a mediator between the individual motivation types of self-determination theory and knowledge sharing.

1291

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine whether prosocial motivation acts as a mediator between the individual motivation types of self-determination theory and knowledge sharing.

Design/methodology/approach

A partial least squares structural equation model (PLS-SEM) based on data collection (N = 303) ) was calculated, using “Smart PLS 3” software.

Findings

In respect of the influence of individual motivation types on knowledge sharing, it was found that prosocial motivation provides indirect mediation for external motivation and complementary mediation for introjected motivation, whereas it has no mediation effect on intrinsic and identified motivation.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should consider the use of prosocial motivation as a mediator to reveal indirect effects that, otherwise, are at risk of remaining hidden.

Practical implications

To foster knowledge sharing within organizations, measures should be taken to increase external, introjected and prosocial motivation, as it was found that these types of motivation have a significant positive impact on knowledge sharing.

Originality/value

The current unanswered question – whether or not prosocial motivation acts as a mediator between the motivation types of self-determination theory and knowledge sharing – is examined, thereby providing insights into the hitherto largely unexplored role of prosocial motivation in knowledge-sharing models.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 8 September 2022

Judith Frei, Dorothea Greiling and Judith Schmidthuber

The purpose of this paper is to explore how Austrian public universities (APUs) respond to the challenge of maintaining academic freedom while complying with legal requirements…

1689

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how Austrian public universities (APUs) respond to the challenge of maintaining academic freedom while complying with legal requirements and enhancing competitiveness by using Management Control Systems (MCSs). Specifically, it examines how APUs respond to the co-presence of academic, government and business logic.

Design/Methodology/Approach

The perspective of institutional logics as a theoretical lens and the framework of MCSs by Malmi and Brown (2008) serve to analyse how APUs respond to the existence of different institutional field-level logics. In-depth expert interviews from the perspective of APUs’ research management are conducted to identify the applied management control practices (MCPs) and APUs’ responses to the different institutional field-level logics.

Findings

This study identifies how academic, government and business logic are represented in field-level-specific MCPs and field-level-specific corresponding narratives. Reflecting upon APUs’ responses to the co-existence of academic and government logic, compliance or rather, selective coupling with government logic or decoupling from government logic became obvious.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study at higher education institutions representing academic, government and business logic in the applied MCPs in research management. The study reveals that APUs have developed specific responses and narratives regarding the existence of different institutional field-level logics.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

Keywords

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