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Abstract

Details

Public Policy and Governance Frontiers in New Zealand
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-455-7

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Jonathan Walsh, Nicholas Taylor, Donna Hough and Paul Brocklehurst

The purpose of this paper was to evaluate a pilot training programme run by Health Education North West to promote clinical leadership amongst general dental practitioners (GDPs)…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to evaluate a pilot training programme run by Health Education North West to promote clinical leadership amongst general dental practitioners (GDPs). New powers and responsibilities for clinicians have caused a fundamental shift in the way that local services are planned and delivered in England. GDPs are being appointed onto the boards of local professional networks (LPNs) to influence the way that services are delivered at a local level. Analogous to clinical commissioning groups in medicine, the role of LPNs is to ensure that GDPs lead change and drive up the quality of service provision. Clinical leadership has been argued to be fundamentally important in these new structures, but has received little attention in the dental literature.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews and a focus group were held with participants of the pilot to explore their understanding and experience of clinical leadership. These were recorded, transcribed verbatim and underwent thematic analysis.

Findings

Nineteen codes were identified and organized into four themes: nature of clinical leadership, challenges for clinical leaders in dentistry, Leadership Exploration and Discovery programme evaluation and future direction.

Practical implications

The research provides an understanding of how GDPs conceptualise clinical leadership and provides recommendations for future leadership training programmes.

Originality/value

This is the first evaluation of a leadership programme for GDPs and so helps address the paucity of evidence in the dental literature.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 27 January 2023

Zoe Hurley

Abstract

Details

Social Media Influencing in The City of Likes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-756-5

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2009

Peggy E. Chaudhry, Jonathan R. Peters and Alan Zimmerman

The major findings of this exploratory research are that a firm’s level of market commitment through future investments will increase in strategically important markets…

Abstract

The major findings of this exploratory research are that a firm’s level of market commitment through future investments will increase in strategically important markets, regardless of high consumer complicity to purchase fake goods; that companies will employ additional anti‐counterfeiting tactics in markets with a high level of pirates and a high degree of enforcement of its intellectual property rights; and that companies employ a standardized approach of anti‐counterfeiting tactics targeted at consumers.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Jonathan A. Jensen, Patrick Walsh and Joe Cobbs

The achievement of a requisite return on investment (ROI) from a brand’s investment in sponsorships of sport events is becoming increasingly important. Consequently, evolving…

1414

Abstract

Purpose

The achievement of a requisite return on investment (ROI) from a brand’s investment in sponsorships of sport events is becoming increasingly important. Consequently, evolving trends in the consumption of the live television broadcasts of such events (e.g. increased usage of second screens by consumers) are an important consideration. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of second screen use during sport broadcast consumption on important marketing outcomes (i.e. brand awareness and the perceived value and intrusiveness of sponsor brand integration), and whether effectiveness is dependent on the consumer’s level of identification with the sport being broadcast.

Design/methodology/approach

A 2×2 (experimental/control and high SportID/low SportID) between-subjects experimental design featuring the broadcast of a sport event as the stimuli was utilized to examine a potential interaction effect between sport identification and second screen use on three dependent variables important for sport sponsors.

Findings

Results confirmed that those with a high level of sport identification realized significantly higher levels of brand awareness for sponsors integrated into the broadcast. However, when consumers were asked to engage in second screen use, the experiment revealed a moderating effect of sport identification on the impact of second screen use, for both brand awareness and the perceived value of the brand integration.

Originality/value

Consumers with higher levels of sport identification are an important target of sport sponsorship activities by brand marketers. Given this, the implication that second screen use can reduce the effectiveness of important sponsorship-related outcomes such as brand awareness is a sobering result for marketers expecting a positive ROI from sponsorships of sport events.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Jonathan Linton and Steven Walsh

The purpose of this paper is to consider whether the characteristics of a technology affect the type of learning mode used for acquiring abilities related to specific…

1157

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider whether the characteristics of a technology affect the type of learning mode used for acquiring abilities related to specific competencies. While technological competencies have a direct impact on firm performance for technology‐intensive start‐ups, few if any of these firms posses all the prerequisite competencies required for a given technology‐product‐market paradigm as the firm enters or remains over time in that market. Consequently, high tech entrepreneurial firms must learn, acquire and develop competencies initially and in response to the changing requirements of industry standard products.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper includes a study of all 35 high‐tech start‐ups in the semiconductor silicon industry using primary and secondary source data.

Findings

The characteristics of a technology affect which of ten different learning methods are chosen by a firm to acquire a competence. The study finds that risk, uncertainty, status, pervasiveness, observability, disruptiveness, and centrality are technological characteristics that influence the learning modes that are selected by a firm.

Originality/value

This is the first study to focus on the impact of technological characteristics on learning methods used. Practical and theoretical value in determining under what technological circumstances a learning method should be used to acquire and develop skills with a new technology.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Robert Tierney, Aard J. Groen, Rainer Harms, Miriam Luizink, Dale Hetherington, Harold Stewart, Steve T. Walsh and Jonathan Linton

Twenty first century problems are increasingly being addressed by multi technology solutions developed by regional entrepreneurial and intreprepreneurial innovators. However, they…

Abstract

Purpose

Twenty first century problems are increasingly being addressed by multi technology solutions developed by regional entrepreneurial and intreprepreneurial innovators. However, they require an expensive new type of fabrication facility. Multiple technology production facilities (MTPF) have become the essential incubators for these innovations. This paper aims to focus on the issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors address the lack of managerial understanding of how to express the value and operationally manage MTPF centers through the use of investigative case study methods for multiple firms in the study.

Findings

Owing to the MTPF centers' novelty and outward similarity to high volume semiconductor fabrication (HVF) facilities, they are laden with ineffective operation and strategic management practices. Metrics are the standard for both operational and strategic management of HVF facilities, yet their application to this new type of center is proving ineffectual.

Research limitations/implications

These new types of regional economic resources may be at risk. A new approach is needed.

Practical implications

The authors develop an operational and strategic metrics management approach for MTPFs that are based on these facilities' unique nature and leverages both the HVF and R&D metrics knowledge base.

Social implications

Innovations at the interface of micro technology, nanotechnology and semiconductor micro fabrication are poised to solve many of these problems and become a basis for job creation and prosperity. If a new management technique is not developed, then these harbingers of regional economic development will be closed.

Originality/value

While there is an abundance of research on metrics for HVF, this is the first attempt to develop metrics for MTPFs.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Kelsey S. Dickson, Sasha M. Zeedyk, Jonathan Martinez and Rachel Haine-Schlagel

Well-documented ethnic disparities exist in the identification and provision of quality services among children receiving community-based mental health services. These disparities…

Abstract

Purpose

Well-documented ethnic disparities exist in the identification and provision of quality services among children receiving community-based mental health services. These disparities extend to parent treatment engagement, an important component of effective mental health services. Currently, little is known about differences in how providers support parents’ participation in treatment and the degree to which parents actively participate in it. The purpose of this paper is to examine potential differences in both provider and parent in-session participation behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants included 17 providers providing standard community-based mental health treatment for 18 parent-child dyads, with 44 per cent of the dyads self-identifying as Hispanic/Latino. In-session participation was measured with the parent participation engagement in child psychotherapy and therapist alliance, collaboration, and empowerment strategies observational coding systems.

Findings

Overall, results indicate significantly lower levels of parent participation behaviours among Hispanic/Latino families compared to their Non-Hispanic/Non-Latino counterparts. No significant differences were seen in providers’ in-session behaviours to support parent participation across Hispanic/Latino and Non-Hispanic/Non-Latino families.

Research limitations/implications

These findings contribute to the literature on ethnic differences in parent treatment engagement by utilising measures of in-session provider and parent behaviours and suggest that further investigation is warranted to documenting and understanding ethnic disparities in parents’ participation in community-based child mental health treatment.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the evaluation of differences in parent treatment engagement through demonstrating the utility of an in-session observational coding system as a measure of treatment engagement.

Article
Publication date: 11 March 2010

Luis A. Perez‐Batres, Michael J. Pisani and Jonathan P. Doh

This paper contributes to the international business lit‐erature by exploring the degree of globalization in our international business journals. Through an investigation of all…

1549

Abstract

This paper contributes to the international business lit‐erature by exploring the degree of globalization in our international business journals. Through an investigation of all multi‐authored articles in core international business journals over a five‐year period, we test the nature of international business authorship by following Rugman’s insights on the regional nature of the MNE. Our findings suggest that within the Triad regions of North America and Western Europe, and similar to MNE patterns and international commerce, international business research is not global. In contrast, within the Triad region of Developed Asia, we find that international business research is global.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Phyl Johnson

This paper reports the findings of in‐depth case study research carried out with the board of a UK family business. The research was designed to explore interaction amongst…

1187

Abstract

This paper reports the findings of in‐depth case study research carried out with the board of a UK family business. The research was designed to explore interaction amongst directors seeking to achieve agreement on a key strategic issue in one of their quarterly board meetings. In particular there is a focus on the extent to which there is parity between individual directors’ own opinions and views about this strategic issue, contributions they made in the boardroom and the collective agreement reached.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

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