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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2020

Jonathan Garnett

The article identifies and examines key elements of a work-based learning framework to consider their use as part of the higher education response to the apprenticeship agenda for…

Abstract

Purpose

The article identifies and examines key elements of a work-based learning framework to consider their use as part of the higher education response to the apprenticeship agenda for the public sector in England.

Design/methodology/approach

This article draws upon work-based learning academic literature and the authors 28 years’ experience of the development and implementation of work-based learning at higher education level in the UK and internationally.

Findings

The article suggests that while the experience of work-based learning at higher education level appears to offer many ready-made tools and approaches for the development and delivery of higher and degree apprenticeships, these should not be adopted uncritically and in some cases may require significant repurposing.

Research limitations/implications

This article is intended to inform practitioners developing degree apprenticeships. Given the degree apprenticeship is still at a relatively early stage in its implementation, this has limited the extent to which it has been possible to review entire degree implementation to the point of participant graduation.

Practical implications

The article draws upon real-life implementation of innovative curriculum design and is of direct practical relevance to the design and operation of work-based learning for degree apprenticeships.

Social implications

Degree apprenticeships have the potential to increase productivity and enhance social mobility. Effective design and implementation of degree apprenticeships in the public sector has the potential to make a significant impact on the quality of public services.

Originality/value

The article provides an informed and sustained examination of how degree apprenticeships, especially those designed for public sector employees, might build upon previous higher education experience in work-based learning.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2016

Jonathan Garnett, Selva Abraham and Param Abraham

The purpose of this paper is to show how work-based and work-applied learning (WAL) can enhance the intellectual capital of organisations.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how work-based and work-applied learning (WAL) can enhance the intellectual capital of organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws organisational learning- and work-based learning literature and case study illustrations.

Findings

To achieve major strategic change in organisations requires working at senior level within the organisation to develop the capability of the organisation to learn and apply that learning strategically. WAL is explicitly geared to bring about change and enhance the learning capability within the organisation.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need for further longitudinal studies of organisations that have used the work-based and WAL approaches.

Practical implications

The conclusions reached have implications for higher education and non-award bearing executive education.

Social implications

The alignment of individual learning with organisational objectives positions learning as a co-operative part of working life rather than just individual preparation for employment.

Originality/value

The paper positions work-based learning and WAL as appropriate responses to the learning needs of organisations as well as individuals.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

Jonathan Garnett

This paper draws upon the extensive operating experience of work based learning programmes by the National Centre for Work Based Learning Partnerships (NCWBLP) at Middlesex…

2187

Abstract

This paper draws upon the extensive operating experience of work based learning programmes by the National Centre for Work Based Learning Partnerships (NCWBLP) at Middlesex University to identify the potential for work based learning to contribute to the intellectual capital not only of employer partners but also to the university. The paper argues that work based learning has the potential to provide the university with a unique opportunity to develop a new kind of knowledge based partnership. The characteristics of such partnerships are discussed with reference to the description of intellectual capital advanced by Stewart and the typology of work based learning put forward by Portwood.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Open Access

Abstract

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Jonathan Garnett

The purpose of this paper is to show how transdisciplinarity is woven into the key curriculum components of individually negotiated work-based learning (WBL) programmes and to…

1361

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how transdisciplinarity is woven into the key curriculum components of individually negotiated work-based learning (WBL) programmes and to focus upon the performative value of knowledge in the work context.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws upon WBL academic literature and the authors 22 years operational experience of WBL.

Findings

The paper suggests that while university-level WBL can enhance the performance of organizations and individuals it is also inherently challenging and challenged by the hegemony of subject disciplines and disciplinary-based university structures. WBL is concerned with knowledge which is often unsystematic, socially constructed and is action focused in order to achieve outcomes of significance to work. This contests the supremacy of the role of the university in curriculum design, delivery and validation of knowledge and means that work-based knowledge is often seen as transdisciplinary rather than conforming to traditional subject disciplines (Boud and Solomon, 2001).

Research limitations/implications

Central to the distinctive nature of university WBL programmes is the role of the external organization as a partner with the university and the individual learner in the planning of learning activities which are intended to have significance for the workplace. For individual knowledge to become organizational knowledge, and thus fully contribute to the intellectual capital of the organization, it must be shared and accepted by others. It follows that a key concern for organizations must be the facilitation of the recognition of knowledge and this goes beyond using a transdisciplinary lens when guiding and assessing the work of individual higher education students.

Practical implications

The paper has practical implications for the design and facilitation of WBL programmes at higher education level.

Originality/value

Provides an informed and sustained examination of the concept of WBL and knowledge.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 6 October 2015

Jonathan Garnett and Angele Cavaye

Recognition of prior learning (RPL) is a process by which both formal learning for recognised awards, informal learning from experience and non-formal learning for uncertificated…

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Abstract

Purpose

Recognition of prior learning (RPL) is a process by which both formal learning for recognised awards, informal learning from experience and non-formal learning for uncertificated but planned learning is given academic recognition. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper refers to international developments in RPL and then focuses upon the extensive and innovative use of RPL by Middlesex University and the developing RPL work at the Australian Institute of Business.

Findings

The Middlesex experience of recognition of learning from experience as part of the development of customised work-based learning programmes demonstrates the potential of RPL for business and management programmes.

Originality/value

The use of RPL for admission and/or credit in standard programmes enables individuals to have their work-based knowledge acknowledged as relevant, worthwhile and equivalent to learning obtained in the higher education classroom.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 6 October 2015

Selva Abraham and Jonathan Garnett

688

Abstract

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2007

Katherine Rounce, Annabel Scarfe and Jonathan Garnett

This paper is of a complex and challenging collaboration. It aims to explore the challenges to both higher education (HE) and commissioners that stimulated different thinking and…

1237

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is of a complex and challenging collaboration. It aims to explore the challenges to both higher education (HE) and commissioners that stimulated different thinking and creative ways of delivering learning, assessing and the consequent impact on practice through a collaborative programme. The purpose of the collaboration was to design and deliver a postgraduate level programme focusing on the development of leadership practice in the health and social care sectors in London and on the development of a curriculum in leadership capabilities and knowledge leading to the award of a Masters in Work Based Learning Studies (Leadership). The two key players were the NHS as commissioners of the work and a London higher education institution (HEI), who worked in partnership to accredit the programme,

Design/methodology/approach

This case study explores the processes, the problems and the rewards that evolved came from an emergent partnership between HE and senior health and social care professionals to develop a postgraduate programme that would meet professional and academic requirements.

Findings

The outcome from this experience evolves around learning about the management of complexity in education partnerships; the importance of planning, and clarity; of roles, purpose and outcomes, and where authority lay. Each side gained a new respect for each other. Most importantly it was generally accepted by the commissioners, the university and the students themselves that the work made a difference to the way health care was delivered and managed, and thus to the patient experience.

Originality/value

This paper should be of value to anyone interested in establishing joint programmes between employers or commissioners and HEIs

Details

Education + Training, vol. 49 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2016

Ruth Helyer

446

Abstract

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Article
Publication date: 11 February 2014

Norman Crowther

125

Abstract

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

1 – 10 of 45