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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2024

Robert Muwanga, Johnson Ssekakubo, Grace Nalweyiso, Slyvia Aarakit and Samuel Kusasira

This study aims to examine the effect of the different forms of attitudes on the behavioural intentions to adopt solar energy technologies (SETs) in Uganda. Although commonly…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effect of the different forms of attitudes on the behavioural intentions to adopt solar energy technologies (SETs) in Uganda. Although commonly examined, the effect of attitudes on people’s behavioural intentions to adopt SETs ought to be more distinctively examined to have a clear picture of how each of the identified sets of attitudes influences the adoption of SETs.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a sample of 360 households from three urban districts in Uganda sampled using a multi-stage sampling technique, data were collected using a self-administrated structured questionnaire. The data were then analysed using partial least square–structural equation model with SmartPLS 3.0 software.

Findings

The study establishes that more specific attitudes affect behavioural intentions to adopt SETs than general pro-technology attitudes. Results reveal that both pro-environment and application-specific attitudes matter for behaviour intentions to adopt SETs amongst households. However, the general pro-technology attitudes are not significantly associated with behavioural intentions to adopt SETs.

Practical implications

The results are important for producers and promoters of solar technology to craft appropriate promotion campaigns intended to increase the acceptance and usage of SETs. This means focussing on creating positive attitudes specific to particular applications and popularising specific uses of solar technologies.

Originality/value

The study provides an alternative approach to the general representation of the attitudes–intentions relationships by examining the differences in the attitudes developed towards the different aspects of these technologies as a substantial source of variations in adoption behaviour, which is rarely addressed.

Details

Technological Sustainability, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2754-1312

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 January 2020

Juma Bananuka, Veronica Mukyala, Zainabu Tumwebaze, Johnson Ssekakubo, Musa Kasera and Mariam Ssemakula Najjuma

The purpose of this paper is to establish whether there is a relationship between religiosity, religious preferences, firm age and intention to adopt Islamic financing in an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish whether there is a relationship between religiosity, religious preferences, firm age and intention to adopt Islamic financing in an emerging economy like Uganda which is a secular state and adopting Islamic financing for the first time.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a cross-sectional and mixed-methods design. The authors administered closed-ended questionnaires and these were supplemented by semi-structured interviews.

Findings

Results indicate that religiosity is significantly associated with intention to adopt Islamic financing. Further, religious experience as a dimension of religiosity is significantly associated with intention to adopt Islamic financing unlike ideology. Religious preferences and firm age are also significantly associated with intention to adopt Islamic financing. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) reveals that there are significant differences in between religions whereby Muslims are more ready for Islamic financing than the Christians are.

Research limitations/implications

This study’s main limitation is that it uses evidence from Uganda’s micro businesses which account for 70 per cent of Uganda’s total businesses. It is unclear on whether this study results can be generalized to the remaining 30 per cent of the businesses and if results of this study can be generalized to other national settings.

Originality/value

Islamic financing being an emerging phenomenon on the African continent especially in the Sub-Saharan Africa where most countries are secular states, there are few empirical studies exploring religiosity, religious preferences, firm age and intention to adopt Islamic financing in an emerging economy perspective. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first paper that provides some insights into religiosity, religious preference, firm age and intention to adopt Islamic financing from a Ugandan perspective using a mixed methods research design.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 July 2020

Zaimy Johana Johan, Mohd Zainee Hussain, Rohani Mohd and Badrul Hisham Kamaruddin

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioural control, religiosity, knowledge and Shariah-compliance with…

1592

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioural control, religiosity, knowledge and Shariah-compliance with intention to hold Shariah-compliant credit card (SCCC) amongst Muslims and non-Muslims.

Design/methodology/approach

Researchers used survey questionnaire to collect data and applied a purposive sampling method, then analyzing the data using descriptive statistics and also multi-group analysis of SmartPLS.

Findings

For Muslims, attitude, subjective norm, Shariah-compliance, knowledge and religiosity are positively significant. While for non-Muslims, only attitude and subjective norm are positively significant to intention to hold SCCCs.

Research limitations/implications

The behavioural study only focusses on intention to hold Islamic credit cards, which is constraining the extended model of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) without the actual performance of the behaviour, which is holding SCCCs. Secondly, the research caters for a single method, namely, quantitative without including the qualitative method to better understand and explore other factors affecting consumers’ behavioural intention. The qualitative part can be carried out by conducting interviews with practitioners, regulators and customers. Thirdly, the cultural dimensions are not combined as parts of TPBs’ antecedents for extended model that could be affecting intention, as Malaysia has diverse ethnic groups with different religious background.

Practical implications

In terms of managerial implications, the findings will further assist financial service providers to develop more effective marketing strategies for Islamic financial products not just to cater for the Muslims but also the non-Muslims, who are increasingly attracted to Islamic banking. As many Muslims are still holding conventional credit cards, it is timely for the Islamic financial institutions to attract them with the SCCCs.

Social implications

Financial marketers are expected to be qualified and well-versed on the different Islamic product structures and also the conventional products. By having such enables them to enlighten and create awareness amongst the targeted consumers in seeking Shariah-compliant financial-related products.

Originality/value

The research will contribute to new theoretical knowledge of an extended behavioural model in relation to customers’ perception towards SCCCs’ acceptance.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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