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1 – 10 of 18
Article
Publication date: 18 September 2007

Rick Holden and John Hamblett

This series of papers aims to explore the transition from higher education into work. It reports on research undertaken over a period of two years and which sought to…

5284

Abstract

Purpose

This series of papers aims to explore the transition from higher education into work. It reports on research undertaken over a period of two years and which sought to track a number of young graduates as they completed their studies and embarked upon career of choice.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach adopted is defined and discussed as one of “common sense”. Alongside the notion of “common sense” the paper deploys two further concepts, “convention” and “faith” necessary to complete a rudimentary methodological framework. The narratives which are at the heart of the papers are built in such a way as to contain not only the most significant substantive issues raised by the graduates themselves but also the tone of voice specific to each.

Findings

Five cases are presented; the stories of five of the graduates over the course of one year. Story lines that speak of learning about the job, learning about the organisation and learning about self are identified. An uneven journey into a workplace community is evident. “Fragmentation” and “cohesion” are the constructs developed to reflect the conflicting dynamics that formed the lived experience of the transitional journeys experienced by each graduate.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst the longitudinal perspective adopted overcomes some of the major difficulties inherent in studies which simply use “snap shot” data, the natural limits of the “common sense” approach restrict theoretical development. Practically speaking, however, the papers identify issues for reflection for those within higher education and the workplace concerned with developing practical interventions in the areas of graduate employability, reflective practice and initial/continuous professional development.

Originality/value

The series of papers offers an alternative to orthodox studies within the broader context of graduate skills and graduate employment. The papers set this debate in a more illuminating context.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 49 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

John Hamblett and Rick Holden

The article explores the growth of EDAP‐style employee led development (ELD) schemes in the 1990s and critically appraises the arguments offered in their support. The…

Abstract

The article explores the growth of EDAP‐style employee led development (ELD) schemes in the 1990s and critically appraises the arguments offered in their support. The dominant claims for ELD sit with equal comfort in the discourse of trade unionists promoting “bargaining for skills”, and managerialists promoting populist notions of the “learning company”. However, the article draws on recent research which suggests that ELD is better understood as a marginal addition to the effort‐reward bargain; a “fringe benefit”, a “way of giving something back” in a period characterised by an intensification of effort, upheaval and uncertainty. Its contribution, therefore, to the emergence of sustainable human resource development is minimal – at least in conventional terms. Through the exposition of two case studies a reformulated argument is offered which seeks to place ELD in a framework of theory and practice which is both more durable and liberating. The article concludes that the ability to make and act upon an informed and rational interpretation of one’s interests, as an individual, or as a member of a collective within the workplace, must surely be premised on the development of an ongoing educational process; a process toward which a reformulated notion of ELD may well contribute.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Denise Thursfield and John Hamblett

The concepts of mutuality, learning and change are embedded in the ideas surrounding employee led development (ELD) schemes. This paper explores the extent to which these…

1698

Abstract

The concepts of mutuality, learning and change are embedded in the ideas surrounding employee led development (ELD) schemes. This paper explores the extent to which these concepts are an accurate reflection of the way such schemes are organised in practice. The article is based on qualitative research carried out in two small to medium sized enterprises in the north of England. We will show that while ELD can be beneficial to employees, attempts to apply the concepts of mutuality, learning and change require caution.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Richard J. Holden and John Hamblett

Initiatives in employee development (non‐work related learning) represent a significant growth phenomenon. Identifies an orthodox account of ED which has developed…

332

Abstract

Initiatives in employee development (non‐work related learning) represent a significant growth phenomenon. Identifies an orthodox account of ED which has developed alongside this growth; one that revolves around shared interests and a routeway to organisation learning. The assumed mutuality which underpins orthodox accounts of the benefits that flow from ED is characterised by a return to learning which leads to greater flexibility, increased commitment and ultimately enhanced performance. Addresses some questions which appear to have been ignored in the desire to promote ED. Highlights key issues, such as, when given the choice, most employees choose not to participate, and questions whether ED can really represent a learning process which is both distinct from and superior to that which takes place day in, day out, within the workplace.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

Richard J. Holden and John Hamblett

Recent official papers and reports credit employee development (initiatives which offer employees of an organisation opportunities to undertake non‐work related learning…

532

Abstract

Recent official papers and reports credit employee development (initiatives which offer employees of an organisation opportunities to undertake non‐work related learning of their choice) as a vehicle for stimulating and promoting ideas of continuous education and lifelong learning. Commentaries such as these contribute to what is defined as an “orthodox” account of ED. In sum the orthodoxy promotes ED on the basis that by promoting learning and flexibility such initiatives contribute to organisational effectiveness and competitiveness. However, the orthodox account is inscribed with two fundamental flaws. The first is theoretical in kind, and concerns the under‐development of its central concepts. The second is of a more practical kind, and refers to the management of ED. The argument is illustrated with reference to both existing data and our own empirical work. The conclusion attempts to develop a more rational justification for ED, suggesting that support for such initiatives represents an ethical imperative. States that in a democratic society the workplace should be regulated in a democratic fashion. ED deserves to be sponsored in so far as it contributes towards this process of “democratisation”

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1976

Tom Schultheiss

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books. Appearance in this column…

Abstract

The following classified, annotated list of titles is intended to provide reference librarians with a current checklist of new reference books. Appearance in this column does not preclude a later review in RSR. Publishers are urged to send a copy of all new reference books directly to RSR as soon as published. Beginning with our next installment, “Reference Books In Print” and “Reference Book Review Index” will be combined, to provide a more complete information index to new reference publications. All current features will be included in the new “Reference Book Review Digest.” Also included will be full cataloging information in the form of Library of Congress headings and Dewey numbers.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Julia Gelfand

208

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 18 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

John H. Humphreys

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether there is historical support for the proposal of Smith, Montagno and Kuzmenko that the specific cultures associated with…

8364

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether there is historical support for the proposal of Smith, Montagno and Kuzmenko that the specific cultures associated with transformational and/or servant leadership would be more or less applicable, based on context. Moreover, its purpose is also to demonstrate that a historical approach can be used effectively to examine such constructs.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a historical examination of the military retreats of Xenophon, a transformational leader, and Chief Joseph, a servant leader, during very similar contextual crises.

Findings

Given similar contexts, the historical record offers support for the proposal of Smith et al.

Research limitations/implications

First, the retreats of Xenophon and Chief Joseph were separated by many hundreds of years and miles. Also inherent with this type of methodology is simple disagreement among readers. Although this author finds great similarity in the retreats of Xenophon and Chief Joseph, there are certainly differences that could be scrutinized as well. Moreover, others might be dissatisfied with the selection of Xenophon and Joseph to represent the leadership styles presented, or with the conclusions regarding their effectiveness. Such debate should be encouraged and could provide additional avenues for future research. Further, the current study considered leader effectiveness only as it related to the achievement of the organizational goal(s). It could be that Joseph's cohorts were more satisfied, committed, etc. than were the followers of Xenophon. This line of inquiry should also be pursued.

Practical implications

This research suggests that transformational leader behavior is likely to be more appropriate during times of significant organizational change.

Originality/value

This is the first study that has examined the speculation of Smith et al. and the first to demonstrate that a historical approach can add to one's understanding of such constructs.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 43 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1957

We have become accustomed to thinking of the United States of America as a big country where it is normal to find things being done in a big way. We have supposed that…

Abstract

We have become accustomed to thinking of the United States of America as a big country where it is normal to find things being done in a big way. We have supposed that their methods of control over the sale of foods and drugs fitted into this generalization, and that our own ways in this country were perhaps a little antiquated, and suffered somewhat from their being tied up too closely with local administration, as compared with the more centralized transatlantic organization. The writer is not competent to make comparisons of this kind and, indeed, they would serve no very useful purpose; our thoughts were directed on these lines, however, through reading the 1955 Annual Report of the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare, and in particular the section of the Report concerned with the Food and Drug Administration.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 59 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 27 April 2010

Daniel A. Glaser‐Segura, Suzanne Mudge, Constantin Brătianu and Ionela Dumitru

This study aims to focus on the role of learning activities on the development of Romanian students making the change from academia to the workplace, specifically focusing…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to focus on the role of learning activities on the development of Romanian students making the change from academia to the workplace, specifically focusing on the role of three learning activities: classroom teaching pedagogies (in‐vitro); field experiences (in‐situ); and self‐development experiential activities.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a 12‐factor scale developed by the authors to measure the role of learning activities on professional identity (PI), 364 students in an English‐language BBA program at a prominent Romanian university were surveyed via an online survey service. From this sample 97 valid responses were obtained and these were regressed on a measure of PI to test three main hypotheses.

Findings

In‐vitro, in‐situ, and self‐development experiential activities exhibited a positive relationship to PI. The two most significant predictors of PI were found to be membership of a professional student group and the use of case studies in class.

Practical implications

The findings of the study have practical implications for the business community and business educators, for activities such as curriculum development, course design and delivery. The findings reinforce the need for more practical pedagogies.

Originality/value

The paper makes an empirical contribution to the field of PI development in Romanian business students and by extension to students in similar post‐Communist countries. To this date there have been no studies that link practical learning activities to the development of PI in a transition society.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 52 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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