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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2019

John Blenkinsopp, Nick Snowden, Russell Mannion, Martin Powell, Huw Davies, Ross Millar and Jean McHale

The purpose of this paper is to review existing research on whistleblowing in healthcare in order to develop an evidence base for policy and research.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review existing research on whistleblowing in healthcare in order to develop an evidence base for policy and research.

Design/methodology/approach

A narrative review, based on systematic literature protocols developed within the management field.

Findings

The authors identify valuable insights on the factors that influence healthcare whistleblowing, and how organizations respond, but also substantial gaps in the coverage of the literature, which is overly focused on nursing, has been largely carried out in the UK and Australia, and concentrates on the earlier stages of the whistleblowing process.

Research limitations/implications

The review identifies gaps in the literature on whistleblowing in healthcare, but also draws attention to an unhelpful lack of connection with the much larger mainstream literature on whistleblowing.

Practical implications

Despite the limitations to the existing literature important implications for practice can be identified, including enhancing employees’ sense of security and providing ethics training.

Originality/value

This paper provides a platform for future research on whistleblowing in healthcare, at a time when policymakers are increasingly aware of its role in ensuring patient safety and care quality.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2019

Russell Mannion, Huw Davies, Martin Powell, John Blenkinsopp, Ross Millar, Jean McHale and Nick Snowden

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether official inquiries are an effective method for holding the medical profession to account for failings in the quality and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether official inquiries are an effective method for holding the medical profession to account for failings in the quality and safety of care.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a review of the theoretical literature on professions and documentary analysis of key public inquiry documents and reports in the UK National Health Service (NHS) the authors examine how the misconduct of doctors can be understood using the metaphor of professional wrongdoing as a product of bad apples, bad barrels or bad cellars.

Findings

The wrongdoing literature tends to present an uncritical assumption of increasing sophistication in analysis, as the focus moves from bad apples (individuals) to bad barrels (organisations) and more latterly to bad cellars (the wider system). This evolution in thinking about wrongdoing is also visible in public inquiries, as analysis and recommendations increasingly tend to emphasise cultural and systematic issues. Yet, while organisational and systemic factors are undoubtedly important, there is a need to keep in sight the role of individuals, for two key reasons. First, there is growing evidence that a small number of doctors may be disproportionately responsible for large numbers of complaints and concerns. Second, there is a risk that the role of individual professionals in drawing attention to wrongdoing is being neglected.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge this is the first theoretical and empirical study specifically exploring the role of NHS inquiries in holding the medical profession to account for failings in professional practice.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2011

Tracy Scurry and John Blenkinsopp

The purpose of this paper is to offer a systematic review of the literature that explores under‐employment among recent graduates. Literature from a range of disciplines…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer a systematic review of the literature that explores under‐employment among recent graduates. Literature from a range of disciplines is reviewed in an attempt to further a theoretical understanding. In doing this, the secondary aim is to identify avenues for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a systematic literature review methodology to answer the question “What is graduate underemployment?”

Findings

The review highlights significant issues around the conceptualisation and measurement of graduate under‐employment. It argues that individual volition and meaning making are important issues that to date remain under‐researched in relation to graduate under‐employment. The paper argues that the most appropriate basis for developing a theoretical understanding of graduate under‐employment is to draw upon relevant theoretical frameworks from career studies – specifically those on the objective‐subjective duality of career, career indecision, and career success. This approach provides a greater focus on the dynamics of the individual's experiences.

Practical implications

This review has implications for a range of stakeholders including students, graduates, teachers and careers advisers, parents, universities, employers, HR professionals and policy makers.

Originality/value

In the context of policy debates surrounding the purpose and value of higher education, this review brings together the highly fragmented perspectives on a phenomenon that encapsulates many of the issues being debated.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

John Blenkinsopp and Marissa S. Edwards

The growth of research into whistle-blowing has produced some compelling insights into this important organizational phenomenon, but a number of areas remain…

Abstract

The growth of research into whistle-blowing has produced some compelling insights into this important organizational phenomenon, but a number of areas remain under-explored, particularly the role of emotion and our understanding of the far more common response to wrongdoing, namely inaction. In this chapter we seek to problematize current conceptualizations of whistle-blowing and wrongdoing, as a basis for examining employee silence in the face of wrongdoing. We suggest that quiescent silence can be viewed as an emotion episode, and draw upon the feedback theory and the sensemaking paradigm to develop this proposition, illustrated through an analysis of accounts of quiescent silence in a clinical setting. We propose a new concept of “cues for inaction” which offers insights into the way quiescent silence arises and persists.

Details

Emotions, Ethics and Decision-Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-941-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

John Blenkinsopp and Brenda Stalker

The phenomenon of current practitioners moving into academia is generally welcomed in terms addressing recruitment problems and the perceived benefit of bringing practical…

Abstract

The phenomenon of current practitioners moving into academia is generally welcomed in terms addressing recruitment problems and the perceived benefit of bringing practical experience into the academic setting. Yet the individual practitioner may encounter considerable difficulties with this career transition. This paper identifies the different sources and discourses of credibility – management experience versus academic knowledge – as particularly relevant, and considers the ways in which these “emergent management academics” manage their self‐identities in their day‐to‐day interactions.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 42 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2011

John Blenkinsopp

Abstract

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 26 January 2010

Carolyn Ward, John Blenkinsopp and Catherine McCauley‐Smith

The purpose of this paper is to develop a research agenda to underpin leadership development activity in the social housing sector, in the light of an identified need for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a research agenda to underpin leadership development activity in the social housing sector, in the light of an identified need for effective leadership in this sector owing to the continual reform and changes it faces.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review is conducted by searching a number of business and management, along with social sciences, databases and texts with the primary focus being leadership and management in social housing. Secondary focus is based around public sector organisations and agencies such as the police and education owing to lack of research in social housing.

Findings

There is a pressing need for leadership development in social housing, yet there is a limited evidence base from which to develop effective development interventions. The most relevant models of leadership appear to be those which focus on inter‐organisational and cross‐sector collaboration, but further research is required to develop a clearer picture of the nature of the leadership challenge within this sector.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is only seen as a first stage as it attempts to draw from what has been already published. The paper develops the own research agenda for a second phase of empirical research in order to continue the debate further.

Originality/value

The paper adds to the discussion and debate around leadership in general but more crucially brings to the surface a number of questions not posed previously that involve the starting‐point for detailed empirical research. Relevant case examples exist within the National Health Service and education, but social housing has remained immune from this up until now.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

John Blenkinsopp and Gill Owens

The paper aims to develop an expanded conceptualisation of copreneurship, locating it within the family embeddedness perspective on entrepreneurship.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to develop an expanded conceptualisation of copreneurship, locating it within the family embeddedness perspective on entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws upon entrepreneurship and family business literatures in order to identify the concept of copreneurship within both traditions.

Findings

Copreneurship has been examined by researchers in both fields and, although there are limitations to the current understanding, it clearly represents an important phenomenon, and the role of spousal support in entrepreneurship being identified as particularly significant.

Research limitations/implications

By locating copreneurship as a key link between the entrepreneurship and family business literatures, this paper offers a useful basis for framing subsequent work using insight from both fields.

Practical implications

Copreneurship, and other forms of small family firms, represent a high proportion of new ventures and there are, therefore, considerable policy benefits to gaining greater understanding of the dynamics of such ventures.

Originality/value

The paper offers an expanded conceptualisation of copreneurship which both increases its utility as a construct and highlight key definitional issues for future research.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2007

John Blenkinsopp and Tracy Scurry

The purpose of this paper is to examine the phenomenon of growing numbers of graduates in non‐graduate occupations (GRINGOs), and to explore the HR issues and complexities…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the phenomenon of growing numbers of graduates in non‐graduate occupations (GRINGOs), and to explore the HR issues and complexities that arise as a consequence. The article also suggests avenues for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study methodology was used to gather data from four companies employing significant numbers of graduates in non‐graduate jobs.

Findings

The case studies suggest that GRINGOs can bring significant benefits to organisations, but are also challenging to manage: organisations which cannot offer them opportunities for career development risk having an able but resolutely uncommitted group of staff.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based on a relatively limited sample, and the respondents were in management, so the findings were not triangulated with the perceptions of GRINGOs within the organisations. There is a paucity of literature examining the consequences of the GRINGO and the challenges that they pose for organisations, and this paper seeks to explore these issues and prompts further research in this area.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that organisations are not fully utilising the potential of their GRINGO staff, and identifies ways in which HR departments might respond to this issue.

Originality/value

The article makes an original contribution to the literature on graduate under‐employment, by examining the issue from an organisational perspective.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2010

John Blenkinsopp and Maryam Shademan Pajouh

Issues of language in international business have been the focus of a growing body of theoretical and empirical work. This paper aims to contribute to this literature…

Abstract

Purpose

Issues of language in international business have been the focus of a growing body of theoretical and empirical work. This paper aims to contribute to this literature, focusing specifically on issues of translation. The role of translator will vary depending on the language strategy adopted, with strategies linked to differing perspectives on language in international business – mechanical, cultural and political. The paper examines these perspectives through the lens of a specific problem for transnational communication – “untranslatable” words and concepts.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews were conducted with professional linguists (translators and interpreters) to explore how they dealt with issues of untranslatable but cultural salient words in their day‐to‐day work with international businesses, using the problems of translating the Farsi word tarouf into English as a case in point.

Findings

The linguists agreed that tarouf was an untranslatable word, and described their strategies to deal with this problem. The commonest strategy was avoidance, stemming from linguists' concern to maintain their professional standing with clients, a finding which reflects an emerging emphasis on the importance of context and relationships for understanding inter‐cultural communication.

Practical implications

The study highlights the crucial role of the translator in international business, and draws attention to the potential for cross‐cultural communication problems arising from mutual lack of awareness of culturally‐salient but inherently untranslatable words or phrases.

Social implications

Effective inter‐cultural communication is an issue of great importance to wider society, and business has historically been the commonest site of such communication. The study highlights an issue of considerable importance for improving inter‐cultural communications, contributing to a growing inter‐disciplinary literature in this area.

Originality/value

Much of the research on language in international business has focused on the emergence of English as a lingua franca, but the present study focuses on specific issues of translation and does so in an under‐researched location, Iran. It draws attention to a problem of translation not widely discussed, and shows how important this issue can be for international business.

Details

Critical perspectives on international business, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

Keywords

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