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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2019

Rebecca Drill, Johanna Malone, Meredith Flouton-Barnes, Laura Cotton, Sarah Keyes, Rachel Wasserman, Kelly Wilson, Monica Young, Holly Laws and Jack Beinashowitz

The purpose of this paper is to address the barrier to care experienced by LGBTQIA+ populations by binary language for gender, sexual orientation and relationship status.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the barrier to care experienced by LGBTQIA+ populations by binary language for gender, sexual orientation and relationship status.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors review the research that shows linguistic barriers are a significant obstacle to healthcare for LGBTQIA+ communities. The authors describe both a process and revisions for addressing language bias in psychiatric intake/research research materials as well as quantify its impact in an adult psychotherapy clinic in a public hospital.

Findings

Patients self-identified their gender, sexual orientation and relationship status in a variety of ways when not presented with binaries and/or pre-established response choices. In addition, the non-response rate to questions decreased and the authors received positive qualitative feedback. The authors also present the revisions to the intake/research materials.

Practical implications

Other healthcare settings/clinicians can revise language in order to remove significant barriers to treatment and in doing so, be welcoming, non-pathologizing and empowering for LGBTQIA+ consumers of mental health services (as well as for non-LGBTQIA+ consumers who are in non-traditional relationships).

Social implications

This work is one step in improving healthcare and the healthcare experience for LGBTQIA+ communities and for those in non-traditional relationships.

Originality/value

This work is set in a public safety-net hospital providing care for underserved and diverse populations. This paper describes the process of revising psychiatric materials to be more inclusive of the range of self-identity are: gender, sexual orientation and relationship status.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2023

Hannah Richardson, Julian Ernst, Rebecca Drill, Annabel Gill, Patrick Hunnicutt, Zoe Silver, Mikaela Coger and Jack Beinashowitz

This study aims to examine what patients say is helpful in psychodynamic psychotherapy by analyzing responses to an open-ended question at two time points: three months into…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine what patients say is helpful in psychodynamic psychotherapy by analyzing responses to an open-ended question at two time points: three months into treatment and termination.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants in this naturalistic study were a diverse group of patients seeking treatment at a psychodynamic psychotherapy training clinic (within a public hospital system). The authors used thematic analysis to categorize patient responses to an open-ended question about what is helpful in their treatment.

Findings

The authors found that a majority of patients found their psychotherapy helpful, and patient responses broke down into 16 categories. Themes that emerged from categories were what patients experience or feel, what therapists/therapy provides and what patients do in therapy. The most frequently endorsed category at both three months and termination was embedded within other categories, “mention of an other,” which captured when patients specifically mentioned another person (i.e. the therapist) in their response. The next most frequently endorsed categories were “talking/someone to talk with,” “feeling better/experiencing well-being/improved functioning” and “having regularity/structure” (at three months) and “having attention directed at experience,” “having regularity/structure” and “experiencing the professional role of the therapist” (at termination).

Originality/value

Findings shed light on factors contributing to helpful psychotherapy from patients’ perspectives in their own words. While previous research has shown that the therapy relationship is an important factor in effective therapy, the findings of this study highlight this ingredient in a personal, spontaneous way.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 July 2021

Sansom Milton

Iraqi universities in the aftermath of invasion in 2003 experienced extremely high levels of “post”-war violence and insecurity. The most widely known dimension of this violence…

Abstract

Iraqi universities in the aftermath of invasion in 2003 experienced extremely high levels of “post”-war violence and insecurity. The most widely known dimension of this violence is the shocking assassination campaign that killed hundreds of Iraqi academics. This paper provides an analysis of violence and insecurity in post-2003 that takes a broader optic and considers multiple forms of vulnerability to attack including insurgencies, sectarian conflict, and criminal violence. It also considers the various responses to the security dilemma taken by Coalition forces – principally counter-terrorism and stabilization efforts – and by Iraqi policy-makers and higher education communities, including security measures, politicization, ethno-sectarianization, and displacement.

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2020

Salma El-Gamal and Johanna Hanefeld

The influx of refugees and asylum-seekers over the past decade into the European Union creates challenges to the health systems of receiving countries in the preparedness and…

Abstract

Purpose

The influx of refugees and asylum-seekers over the past decade into the European Union creates challenges to the health systems of receiving countries in the preparedness and requisite adjustments to policy addressing the new needs of the migrant population. This study aims to examine and compare policies for access to health care and the related health outcomes for refugees and asylum-seekers settling both in the UK and Germany as host countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper conducted a scoping review of academic databases and grey literature for studies within the period 2010-2017, seeking to identify evidence from current policies and service provision for refugees and asylum-seekers in Germany and the UK, distilling the best practice and clarifying gaps in knowledge, to determine implications for policy.

Findings

Analysis reveals that legal entitlements for refugees and asylum-seekers allow access to primary and secondary health care free of charge in the UK versus a more restrictive policy of access limited to acute and emergency care during the first 15 months of resettlements in Germany. In both countries, many factors hinder the access of this group to normal health care from legal status, procedural hurdles and lingual and cultural barriers. Refugees and asylum-seeker populations were reported with poor general health condition, lower rates of utilization of health services and noticeable reliance on non-governmental organizations.

Originality/value

This paper helps to fulfill the need for an extensive research required to help decision makers in host countries to adjust health systems towards reducing health disparities and inequalities among refugees and asylum-seekers.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 January 2020

Patrick Lo and Andrew Stark

The purpose of this paper is to analyse managerial approaches of a selective group of national library directors, examining their views and perceptions of successful library…

1179

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse managerial approaches of a selective group of national library directors, examining their views and perceptions of successful library leadership in the twenty-first century in different sociocultural contexts. This study was carried out based on a series of semi-structured interviews with ten top-level directors of national libraries located on different continents.

Design/methodology/approach

The data collection method for this study consisted of the narrative analysis of the ten interviews coupled with the participative leadership theory, which highlights the leaders’ desire to create a more democratic culture within their library organisations.

Findings

The analysis of these interviews reveals that many of the directors’ responses were supportive to the concepts discussed in participative leadership. National librarians, through their participative leadership philosophies, values and beliefs, contributed to the development of an institutional culture that fostered improving trust, communications, engagement as well as promotion of inter-team relationships by breaking down the traditional “hierarchical” barriers within their organisations.

Research limitations/implications

The participants were predominantly from Europe; only one participant represented the USA, Middle East (Israel) and Northern Africa (Egypt). As a result, there are not many diverse viewpoints from national library directors outside of Europe. Further studies would be needed to obtain a more international perspective in the national library sphere. Furthermore, this study only examines the views and attitudes of ten different library directors. In comparison with the totality of national library directors across the world, this is a relatively small sample. This study may not be representative of all national library directors around the world.

Originality/value

The results of this study would be of interest to library professionals and educators interested in management, as well as Library and Information Science students who want to understand how national library directors view successful traits of participative leadership in different sociocultural contexts.

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2020

Wenqing Wu, Hongxin Wang, Chun-Wang Wei and Chundong Zheng

This study explores the influence of sharing achievement (i.e. sustainability, enjoyment, and economic benefits) obtained by participating in the sharing economy on social…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores the influence of sharing achievement (i.e. sustainability, enjoyment, and economic benefits) obtained by participating in the sharing economy on social entrepreneurial intention (SEI), as well as the role of perceived social worth and social entrepreneurial self-efficacy (SESE).

Design/methodology/approach

This study used multiple regression analysis on a sample of 331 MBA students aged between 24 and 48 years.

Findings

The findings indicate that sharing achievement is positively related with SEI, and perceived social worth mediates the relationship between them. Moreover, SESE not only has a moderating effect on the relationship between perceived social worth and SEI but also positively moderates the overall mediation model.

Practical implications

Entrepreneurship educators could focus on improving students' SESE through courses and training. Whereas, policymakers and decision makers should actively promote the sharing economy model and regulate its management. Moreover, existing organizers of the sharing economy should improve participants' sharing achievement.

Originality/value

This study determines the relationship between sharing achievement and SEI and enriches the push/pull theory from the perspective of pull factors in the context of the sharing economy. Moreover, by exploring the mediating effect of perceived social worth and the moderating effect of SESE, the study provides understanding on the influence mechanisms of sharing achievements on SEI.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 59 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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