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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1993

Johan van Ophem and Ton Schellart

Critically examines the 1993‐reform in the Disablement Act foremployees in The Netherlands. Demonstrates that the new measures, whichare mainly directed at lowering the…

Abstract

Critically examines the 1993‐reform in the Disablement Act for employees in The Netherlands. Demonstrates that the new measures, which are mainly directed at lowering the benefit and at limiting the duration, are not as effective in reducing expenditures in this field as they were meant to be. In addition, by means of a simulation model shows that almost the same degree of savings can be achieved by a different type of policy, namely prevention policy, without lowering the benefit and limiting the duration of it. Examines the conditions for a successful prevention policy. Finally, discusses the social security changes in The Netherlands within a European socio‐economic perspective.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 20 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 8 December 2017

Mirte Horrevorts, Johan Van Ophem and Paul Terpstra

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the cleanliness of a work environment has influence on the productivity of employees working in office environments of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the cleanliness of a work environment has influence on the productivity of employees working in office environments of non-profit organizations in The Netherlands.

Design/methodology/approach

In the study, an online survey (including questions about the perceived cleanliness) and two objective cleanliness assessment methods (particle counts and surface cleanliness) are used. The data are collected using an online questionnaire to determine the workers’ perception (of productivity and cleanliness) and to measure the cleanliness (visual assessment of the surface cleanliness and measured [dust] particle counts in the ambient air) at five different non-profit organizations in The Netherlands.

Findings

It is found that a higher objective cleanliness correlates significantly with a higher perceived productivity of employees working in office environments of non-profit organizations in The Netherlands. A higher measured cleanliness also correlates significantly with a higher work satisfaction level of employees working in office environments. Finally, a significant correlation is found between the satisfaction of employees with their work as a whole and the perceived productivity of the employees; a higher satisfaction leads to a higher perceived productivity.

Research limitations/implications

The cleanliness is measured in five non-profit organizations, so it is not possible to draw any strong generalization. Future studies are needed to confirm or contradict the findings in this research.

Practical implications

The results highlight the aspects of the cleanliness in the office environment that influence the perceived productivity. This concerns the measured cleanliness. Employees evaluate their own productivity lower at a higher level of particle counts in the ambient air in the office environment and when more dirt and stain are found on the surface (lower surface cleanliness). In response to these findings, it is recommended to carry out regular cleaning activities in the office environment where the employees perform their work. Overall, to maintain or achieve maximum personal productivity, a clean office environment is important.

Originality/value

This research is the first to identify the relationship between perceived productivity and measured cleanliness of the office environment.

Details

Facilities, vol. 36 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Hans Dagevos and Johan van Ophem

This paper seeks to argue that a new and broader definition of food value should be introduced that includes other factors than the traditional mantra of nutritional…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to argue that a new and broader definition of food value should be introduced that includes other factors than the traditional mantra of nutritional value, appearance, and the like. This paper introduces the concept of food consumption value (FCV).

Design/methodology/approach

The development of FCV is based upon various research traditions and corresponding bodies of literature. The four constituting parts of FCV origins in different lines of scholarly theorising. These lines of thought are discussed separately. Collectively, they form the breeding ground of the concept of food consumption value.

Findings

The consumer-centred framework of FCV consists of four elements. Product value refers to food's features and functionalities like taste or texture. Process value refers to consumers' interest in the practices and processes of food production. Ethical considerations (consumer concerns) are thus taken into account. Furthermore, FCV encompasses location value and emotional value. Location value refers to the setting in which food is purchased or consumed. Emotional value is the most elusive element of FCV, because it refers to “feel goods” such as experience, entertainment, (self) indulgence or identity values with respect to the consumption of food products or brands.

Practical implications

The message of FCV for (marketing) practitioners in the field of food is that value creation should depart from assessing consumer value in narrow senses such as value for money. The feelings that foods can arouse are anything but valueless intangibilities, but crucial assets of value creation and competitiveness. Another practical implication of FCV is that for value creation in the food supply chain it is a sine qua non that downstream (location value) and upstream (process value) are fine-tuned consistently and constructively.

Originality/value

This paper is the first exploratory study on the development of the new concept of FCV that examines consumer value beyond tangible product attributes and price. This broader concept of FCV aims to interpret value in terms that adjust to today's consumer-oriented food market. Though inspired by other interpretations of value in marketing and food studies, FCV differs from these.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 115 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Martin Hingley and Adam Lindgreen

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541

Abstract

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 115 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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