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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

William E. Kilbourne, Jo Ann Duffy, Michael Duffy and George Giarchi

This study investigates the applicability of a modified SERVQUAL instrument as a means of measuring residents' perceptions of long‐term health‐care service quality in the USA and…

5785

Abstract

This study investigates the applicability of a modified SERVQUAL instrument as a means of measuring residents' perceptions of long‐term health‐care service quality in the USA and UK. The results confirm a stable, four‐factor structure that is similar to previously defined service quality dimensions and is invariant across the countries studied.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 18 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2009

Silvia Inés Monserrat, Jo Ann Duffy, Miguel R. Olivas‐Luján, John M. Miller, Ann Gregory, Suzy Fox, Terri R. Lituchy, Betty Jane Punnett and Neusa María Bastos F. Santos

The purpose of this paper is to compare women's mentoring experience in nine countries within the Americas, and to explore linkages between personal characteristics, mentoring…

1454

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare women's mentoring experience in nine countries within the Americas, and to explore linkages between personal characteristics, mentoring practices, mentoring functions, and consequences of being mentee.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 1,146 successful women are questioned about their mentoring experiences as a mentee: 105 from Argentina, 210 from Brazil, 199 from Canada, 84 from Chile, 232 from Mexico, 126 from the USA, and 190 from three countries in the West Indies (Barbados, Jamaica, and St Vincent).

Findings

Most of the women have more than one mentor. Across all countries mentoring practices are more strongly linked to career mentoring function while the age and gender of the mentor are more strongly linked to psychosocial mentoring. Mentoring from the perspective of mentee has the same directional relationship with situational and individual variables, but the significance of those relationships vary by country. A possible cultural difference is detected between Spanish and non‐Spanish speaking countries on the issue of mentoring practice.

Research limitations/implications

The fact that the paper focuses only on successful women in this paper means the findings are not necessarily generalizable to other groups of women or men. The paper is also limited because mentoring functions are constrained to two: psychosocial and career. There may be more functions that mentoring could fulfill for the mentee.

Practical implications

Companies' interest in fostering mentoring among their members, particularly women, should be aware that different mentoring functions are influenced by different factors. For example, formal mentoring programs appear to have a greater impact on career mentoring functions than on psychosocial mentoring functions. To support women in their careers, companies should institute formal mentoring programs; this is especially important in South American countries. Moreover, mentoring programs must be designed to be adaptive since the analyses indicated that there are significant differences by country in terms of many mentoring issues.

Originality/value

In the literature review, the paper finds linkages between culture, mentoring practices, characteristics of mentors and mentees, and mentoring functions, but no evidence that these linkages have been studied with a group of professionally successful women from different American countries, particularly non‐English speaking American countries.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Jo Ann M. Duffy, James A. Fitzsimmons and Nikhil Jain

One of the fastest growing service industries is long‐term care. Identifying the best performers in the industry in terms of service productivity is difficult because there is no…

3032

Abstract

Purpose

One of the fastest growing service industries is long‐term care. Identifying the best performers in the industry in terms of service productivity is difficult because there is no single summary measure of outcomes, particularly quality outcomes. The purpose of the paper is to show the potential of data envelopment analysis (DEA) as a benchmarking method in long‐term care.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides background information on the long‐term care industry and describes the DEA methodology and applications to long‐term care. Data originated from two data sources with four databases furnishing information on 69 long‐term care facilities used.

Findings

In the hypotheses tested it was found that most of the models showed that for profit nursing homes were significantly more efficient than nonprofit. The exception was in the model that included the condition of patients as a co‐production input and then there was no significant difference in efficient performance between ownership types.

Originality/value

The paper shows the value of DEA as a method of benchmarking in the context of long‐term care.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Jo Ann Duffy, Suzy Fox, Betty Jane Punnett, Ann Gregory, Terri Lituchy, Silvia Inés Monserrat, Miguel R. Olivas‐Luján, Neusa Maria Bastos F. Santos and John Miller

The intent of this cross‐national research is to study the personal and cultural characteristics of successful professional women. High‐achieving women may share certain personal…

2081

Abstract

Purpose

The intent of this cross‐national research is to study the personal and cultural characteristics of successful professional women. High‐achieving women may share certain personal characteristics, beliefs, and experiences, regardless of the countries in which they live. However, every individual is socialized within a particular national culture, and may be expected to share certain values and expectations with other members of that culture.

Design/methodology/approach

Over 1,100 professionally “successful women” (including high‐level managers, entrepreneurs, academics, government personnel, and professionals) and 531 undergraduate business students in nine countries – Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Mexico, the USA and the West Indies (Barbados, Jamaica, St. Vincent, and the Grenadines) completed surveys containing two sets of variables: national/cultural (collectivism/individualism, power distance, uncertainty avoidance) and personal (self‐efficacy, locus of control, need for achievement).

Findings

There were significant differences in the personal characteristics between successful women and the student comparison samples, with successful women consistently higher on self‐efficacy and need for achievement, and more internal on locus of control. There were some significant but smaller than expected differences in cultural characteristics between national samples.

Originality/value

This contrast of successful women living in the Americas provides new insights for managers of international companies seeking to be gender inclusive.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 29 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2007

Pamela Lirio, Terri R. Lituchy, Silvia Ines Monserrat, Miguel R. Olivas‐Lujan, Jo Ann Duffy, Suzy Fox, Ann Gregory, B.J. Punnett and Neusa Santos

The purpose of this paper is to examine career‐life issues of successful women in the Americas.

4185

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine career‐life issues of successful women in the Americas.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 30 interviews were conducted with successful women in Canada, Argentina and Mexico. Themes were pulled from the interview transcripts for each country, analyzed and then compared across countries, looking at universalities and differences of experiences.

Findings

The women in all three countries conveyed more subjective measures of career success, such as contributing to society and learning in their work, with Canada and Mexico particularly emphasizing receiving recognition as a hallmark of career success.

Practical implications

This research provides insight into the experiences of successful women in the Americas, which can inform the career development of women in business.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the literature on women's careers, highlighting successful women's experiences across cultures and in an under‐researched area: Latin America.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 July 2007

Betty Jane Punnett, Jo Ann Duffy, Suzy Fox, Ann Gregory, Terri Lituchy, John Miller, Silvia Inés Monserrat, Miguel R. Olivas‐Luján and Neusa Maria Bastos F. Santos

This project aims to examine levels of career and life satisfaction among successful women in nine countries in the Americas.

2856

Abstract

Purpose

This project aims to examine levels of career and life satisfaction among successful women in nine countries in the Americas.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured survey and in‐depth interviews were used, and a variety of occupations, demographics, and personality characteristics assessed – 1,146 successful women from nine countries in the USA responded the survey: 105 from Argentina, 210 from Brazil, 199 from Canada, 84 from Chile, 232 from Mexico, 126 from the USA, and 190 from three countries in the West Indies (Barbados, Jamaica, SVG).

Findings

Results show no differences in satisfaction based on occupation or country and most demographic variables investigated did not have a significant relationship with satisfaction. Age had a small, significant, relationship, with satisfaction increasing with age; married women were significantly more satisfied than single women. Higher scores on self efficacy and need for achievement, and a greater internal locus of control were all related to higher levels of satisfaction. The relationship between career satisfaction and general life satisfaction was stronger in Argentina and Chile that in the other countries.

Originality/value

Extends understanding of professional success and satisfaction, in terms of demographic variables and personality, as well as geographically.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Joe Kavanaugh, Jo Ann Duffy and Juliana Lilly

The study aims to examine the association between job satisfaction and demographic variables, such as years in profession, of healthcare professionals in an in‐patient…

7965

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to examine the association between job satisfaction and demographic variables, such as years in profession, of healthcare professionals in an in‐patient rehabilitation hospital setting.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 128 employees were surveyed using a 47‐item opinion survey to assess demographic variables and overall job satisfaction, as well as nine facets of job satisfaction.

Findings

The findings indicate that years in profession (professional experience) is associated with job satisfaction in a defined pattern.

Research limitations/implications

These findings need to be tested in other professional groups where plateauing is common. The results are limited by the use of a convenience sample, relatively small sample size, some categorical data that restricted the forms of analysis, and the fact that only demographic variables were examined. The use of continuous measures and broadening the study to include other organizational variables and personal variables would provide more robust results.

Practical implications

The paper suggests a two‐tier program of coaching and mentoring to address issues in job motivation, which may lead to increased job satisfaction and retention of health care professionals.

Originality/value

Drawing from earlier literature, strategies such as mentoring and coaching are proposed for moderating the negative effect of plateauing on satisfaction. The value of the paper is the identification of a pattern in the motivation of plateaued employees and the application of previous findings about coaching and mentoring that may address issues of employee motivation and retention.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Juliana D. Lilly, Jo Ann Duffy and Meghna Virick

The purpose of this study is to study gender differences in the relationship between McClelland's needs, stress, and turnover intentions with work‐family conflict.

5605

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to study gender differences in the relationship between McClelland's needs, stress, and turnover intentions with work‐family conflict.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 383 individuals representing 15 different industries. Multiple regression analysis was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Results suggest that McClelland's needs act as an antecedent of work‐family conflict, and that they have a differential impact on work‐family conflict for women and men.

Research limitations/implications

The subjects were college graduates, hence it was a self‐selected sample, and the results may not generalise to other populations.

Practical implications

Women are more affected by family obligations than men and this may impact the performance and turnover intentions of women in organisations.

Originality/value

This paper enhances understanding of work‐family conflict by specifically examining individual differences such as need for power, need for achievement and need for affiliation and evaluating their impact on turnover intention and job tension.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 21 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Jo Ann M. Duffy, John M. Miller and James B. Bexley

Through means of an empirical study of service recovery in US retail banking this paper aims to examine the link between satisfaction and various recovery strategies.

5081

Abstract

Purpose

Through means of an empirical study of service recovery in US retail banking this paper aims to examine the link between satisfaction and various recovery strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 310 bank customers responded to a survey addressing customer demographics, levels of satisfaction, types of recovery strategies, and service recovery employees. Frequencies, chi‐square analysis and correspondence analysis were used to analyze the data.

Findings

The findings show no significant difference in recovery strategies or satisfaction by customer age, gender, or tenure with bank. However, the degree of customer satisfaction was strongly influenced by the type of recovery strategy used by the bank. The results indicate that recovery efforts are best directed toward empathic listening and fixing the problem rather than apologizing or making atonement.

Originality/value

This study of service recovery in US retail banking provides useful information on the link between satisfaction and various recovery strategies.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

Aneika L. Simmons, Jo Ann Duffy and Hamed S. Alfraih

The purpose of this paper is to determine how men's perceptions of power distance (PD) and levels of social dominance orientation (SDO) interact to influence perceptions of women…

1990

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine how men's perceptions of power distance (PD) and levels of social dominance orientation (SDO) interact to influence perceptions of women as managers in egalitarian and non‐egalitarian countries.

Design/methodology/approach

A team of multinational researchers distributed questionnaires composed of previously validated scales measuring SDO, PD and Attitude toward Women as Managers to US and Kuwaiti men in college. The study hypotheses were tested using hierarchical regression.

Findings

It was discovered that high levels of SDO in college men was negatively related to a favorable attitude toward women as managers in both the US and Kuwait. It was also found that perceptions of PD moderated the relationship between SDO and attitudes toward women as managers in Kuwait, but not in the USA. In addition, the interaction between PD and SDO was weaker in cultures that are more egalitarian as compared to those considered to be non‐egalitarian. The findings also suggested within‐group variance in terms of PD (i.e. Kuwait).

Originality/value

To the authors' knowledge, they are the first to empirically support the idea that PD interacts with SDO in influencing attitudes toward women managers in a comparison of countries with different levels of gender egalitarianism.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

1 – 10 of 29