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Article
Publication date: 22 August 2023

Javad Hashempour, Zubaida Shebani and Jeffrey Kimble

Firefighting can pose a number of psychological health risks due to the nature of the job. Previous studies have examined the relationship between distress symptoms in…

Abstract

Purpose

Firefighting can pose a number of psychological health risks due to the nature of the job. Previous studies have examined the relationship between distress symptoms in firefighters and factors such as age, experience in the service, workload, sleep and alcohol use. However, the relationship between risk factors and mental health problems in firefighters remains unclear. In the present study, the authors aim to assess mental distress among Muscat firefighters using the Brief Symptom Inventory-18. The authors expected that this research will allow researchers to determine the prevalence of mental distress among Muscat firefighters and assess the role of the above risk factors on the ratio.

Design/methodology/approach

The assessment includes the prevalence of anxiety, somatization and depression symptoms among firefighters. The impact of sociodemographic factors, sleep problems and smoking on symptomatic cases was also evaluated. Data was collected from 110 firefighters then processed as per instructions in the BSI-18 manual to identify clinical cases in each of the three scales of the assessment.

Findings

Results show that all factors influence the number of cases to different extents. Young, single firefighters with high school level education were found to have the highest number of extreme cases followed by those who are non-smokers and satisfied with their job. This study did not find a relationship between sleep disorder and job dissatisfaction with regard to the number of critical cases. The prevalence of anxiety, somatic and depression cases among firefighters was found to be 11.8%, 10.9% and 10%, respectively. These findings have implications for fire service work-organization policies and for the development and monitoring of treatment programs for firefighters.

Originality/value

This work presents a comprehensive assessment on common factors that may impact prevalence of mental distress among an underrepresented firefighter community. These findings have implications for fire service work-organization policies and for updating current monitoring programs or updating new programs for firefighters.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 November 2023

Paresh Wankhade

153

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Book part
Publication date: 26 June 2007

Jeffrey W. Lucas, Heather Ridolfo, Reef Youngreen, Christabel L. Rogalin, Shane D. Soboroff, Layana Navarre-Jackson and Michael J. Lovaglia

Two studies investigate gender and status effects on self-handicapping: selecting actions that can impair future performances, perhaps to protect self-image. Gender socialization…

Abstract

Two studies investigate gender and status effects on self-handicapping: selecting actions that can impair future performances, perhaps to protect self-image. Gender socialization and status processes suggest two potential explanations for the consistent finding that men self-handicap more than women. If status differences contribute to the tendency to self-handicap, then holding gender constant, those with high status on other characteristics would self-handicap more than those with low status. In Study 1, men assigned to high-status positions selected less study time (and thus self-handicapped more) than did men assigned to low-status positions. Women assigned high status, however, self-handicapped no more than did women assigned low status. Because study time as a measure of self-handicapping may be confounded with confidence or motivation, a second study assigned status and measured self-handicapping by the selection of performance-enhancing or -detracting music. Study 2 also found that high status increased self-handicapping among men but not among women. Both gender socialization and status processes may play roles in self-handicapping.

Details

Social Psychology of Gender
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1430-0

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 1 May 2020

Clarissa J. Humphreys and Graham J. Towl

Abstract

Details

Addressing Student Sexual Violence in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-141-9

Abstract

Details

Addressing Student Sexual Violence in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-141-9

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1995

Martin Fojt

This special “Anbar Abstracts” issue of the International Journal of Bank Marketing is split into five sections covering abstracts under the following headings: Marketing…

8399

Abstract

This special “Anbar Abstracts” issue of the International Journal of Bank Marketing is split into five sections covering abstracts under the following headings: Marketing Strategy; Customer Service; Sales and Promotion; Product Development; Information Technology Strategies.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 13 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Article
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Robert Charnock and Keith Hoskin

This paper brings insights from accounting scholarship to the measurement and reporting challenges of metagovernance approaches to sustainable development. Where scholarship on…

1389

Abstract

Purpose

This paper brings insights from accounting scholarship to the measurement and reporting challenges of metagovernance approaches to sustainable development. Where scholarship on metagovernance—the combination of market, hierarchical and network governance—proposes deductive approaches to such challenges, we contend that a historically informed “abductive” approach offers valuable insight into the realpolitik of intergovernmental frameworks.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a Foucauldian “archaeological–genealogical” method to investigate the inclusion of climate change as a Sustainable Development Goal (SDG). It analyses more than 100 documents and texts, tracking the statement forms that crystallise prevailing truth claims across the development of climate and SDG metagovernance.

Findings

We show how the truth claims now enshrined in the Paris Agreement on Climate Change constrained the conceptualisation and operationalisation of SDG 13: Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts. The paper thereby reframes recent measurement and reporting challenges as outcomes of conceptual conflicts between the technicist emphasis of divisions within the United Nations and the truth claims enshrined in intergovernmental agreements.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates how an archaeological–genealogical approach may start to address the measurement and reporting challenges facing climate and SDG metagovernance. It also highlights that the two degrees target on climate change has a manifest variability of interpretation and shows how this characteristic has become pivotal to operationalising climate metagovernance in a manner that respects the sovereignty of developing nations.

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