Search results

1 – 10 of 20
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Luqman Oyekunle Oyewobi, Abimbola Olukemi Windapo and James Olabode Bamidele Rotimi

Literature suggests that there are sets of common variables that are capable of explaining organisational performance differentials. These variables are used to examine…

Abstract

Purpose

Literature suggests that there are sets of common variables that are capable of explaining organisational performance differentials. These variables are used to examine performance variance and its contribution to organisation profitability. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to examine the determinants of large construction organisations’ performance in South Africa using a partial least squares path analytic method.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examines the interrelationship between a number of constructs, namely, organisational characteristics, resources/capabilities, competitive strategies, business environment and performance, using a questionnaire survey to obtain data from 72 large construction organisations in South Africa. Using a path analytic approach, the paper examines the relationship between the constructs discussed in the study.

Findings

The findings from the analysis of the data show that organisational characteristics do indeed influence the performance of organisations, and that the business environment is capable of moderating the relationship between competitive strategies and performance. The results, however, indicate that organisations that combine sustained organisational characteristics and strategy tend to experience high performance over those that do not.

Originality/value

The study findings have implications for management practice, as it could help managers of construction organisations to acknowledge the influence of organisational characteristics, unique resources/capabilities, competitive strategies and business environment as sources of competitive advantage. The study contributes to the current debate on the causes of performance differentials among large construction organisations.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Luqman Oyekunle Oyewobi, Abimbola Windapo and James Olabode Bamidele Rotimi

The decision-making styles and strategies of organisations play significant roles in their competitive advantage and the achievement of superior performance. The purpose…

2178

Abstract

Purpose

The decision-making styles and strategies of organisations play significant roles in their competitive advantage and the achievement of superior performance. The purpose of this study is to explore the effect of decision-making styles on the strength of the relationship between competitive strategy and organisational performance among large construction organisations based in South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

The study focuses on large construction organisations in South Africa using a questionnaire survey to elicit information. The sample consists of 72 large construction organisations, and the measures of decision-making styles, competitive strategies and organisational performance used for the instrument utilised to elicit information were derived from the literature. Descriptive, parametric and multiple regression analyses were used to determine the effect of decision-making styles and competitive strategies on the organisations’ performance.

Findings

The results of the study show that organisations utilize all types of decision-making styles, but the most significantly adopted styles are analytical and directive. The study found that decision-making styles influence organisational performance through competitive strategies.

Research limitations/implications

The research considered large construction organisations based in South Africa and operating in three provinces, where almost 75 per cent of all public projects are being implemented. The findings can be generalised to other large construction organisations functioning within the South African industry, because most of the organisations surveyed operate nationally. However, the findings may not be generalizable to the entire industry. Small and medium-sized organisations vary in terms of structure in relation to large organisations; hence, their decision-making styles may be different.

Practical implications

The study makes explicit the need to consider the role of different decision-making styles being practiced within organisations and how their moderating effect influences organisational performance beyond rational processes. A better understanding of this will enable organisations to achieve the total commitment of their staff to achieve superior performance.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the existing literature and body of knowledge on the strategic management of organisations. It underpins the assertion that decision-making styles and competitive strategies can influence organisational performance, and this is validated within the construction industry. Knowledge of the relationships between the variables measured in this paper will be beneficial to both owners and managers of construction organisations, because they provide the necessary information on how strategic decision-making styles influence the strategy adopted and, in turn, the organisational performance.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 October 2016

Luqman Oyekunle Oyewobi, Abimbola Olukemi Windapo, James Olabode Bamidele Rotimi and Richard Ajayi Jimoh

The purpose of this paper is to examine the possible moderating role of organisational characteristics (organisational structure, management style and decision-making…

3472

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the possible moderating role of organisational characteristics (organisational structure, management style and decision-making style) in the relationship between strategy and organisational performance among large construction organisations in South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a quantitative research approach using a questionnaire survey to obtain data from 72 large construction organisations in South Africa. Using hierarchical multiple regression, the paper examines the relationship between the constructs discussed in the study.

Findings

The internal characteristics of the organisation form the vital basis for achieving optimal performance. The results obtained from the analysis revealed that decision-making style directly influences the measure of organisational effectiveness, while it could also be inferred that organisational characteristics partly moderate the relationship between competitive strategy and organisational performance. The findings indicate that internal characteristics is one of the means through which organisational strategic factors and contextual aspects are organised to achieve greater organisational performance levels.

Originality/value

The findings have theoretical implications for strategic management literature in construction as it extends the scope of research on strategic management from assessing a set of individual management practices to evaluating a complex mechanism that connects internal characteristics and competitive advantage. It is believed that this study will contribute positively to the role of organisational characteristics in the competitive strategy-performance relationships in large construction organisations in South Africa and to the ongoing discussion on emerging strategic management issues in construction.

Article
Publication date: 3 December 2021

James Olabode Bamidele Rotimi, Chamil Dilhan Erik Ramanayaka, Oluwole Alfred Olatunji and Funmilayo Ebun Rotimi

The demand for construction-related occupations has increased consistently over many years in New Zealand (NZ). This has necessitated recourse to migrant workers to…

Abstract

Purpose

The demand for construction-related occupations has increased consistently over many years in New Zealand (NZ). This has necessitated recourse to migrant workers to address capacity and capability requirements. Migrant construction workers hail from various backgrounds with a complex set of their needs being met through employment in NZ. Research on understanding the satisfaction levels of this category of construction workers is scarce. With recent insinuations about migrant exploitations, research investigations into this knowledge area are significant. In this study, the authors sought to establish the moderating effect of migrants' demography on the determinants of job satisfaction in NZ's construction sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained from migrant construction workers of Chinese extraction through a structured questionnaire survey. From 200 questionnaires administered, 108 samples were completed by migrant construction workers involved in major projects in Auckland city, NZ. Data obtained were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics to establish the moderating effects of their demography on job satisfaction.

Findings

Results from this study support the internal validity and reliability of these personal characteristics as moderators of job satisfaction for migrant construction workers. These results suggest the relevance of personal characteristics of Chinese migrants in any improvement initiatives being developed for this group of construction workers.

Research limitations/implications

The findings from this study contribute to the discourse on the relevance of construction migrants as a strategic alternative to addressing skill shortages within the NZ construction sector. They also provide evidence that contributes to an improved understanding of the migrant workforce to meet their aspirations and enhance their general well-being.

Originality/value

Although the study is ethnic-specific, the conclusions show the relevance of personal characteristics in the experiences of construction migrant workers. The study is representative of the catchment of temporary migrant workers in the construction industry in NZ. The study provides insights for organisations employing migrants about putting in place appropriate measures to enhance their satisfaction levels. Finally, this study's findings may contribute to policy initiatives on the optimal categories of migrants engaged on construction activities to derive the maximum benefits for NZ.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 March 2022

Oluwole Alfred Olatunji, Chamil Dilhan Erik Ramanayaka, Funmilayo Ebun Rotimi and James Olabode Bamidele Rotimi

The normative literature suggests that there are more than seventy decision factors that contractors must consider if they intend to success in their bid and projects. In…

Abstract

Purpose

The normative literature suggests that there are more than seventy decision factors that contractors must consider if they intend to success in their bid and projects. In addition, such factors have been grouped in relation to project characteristics, client attributes, contractors' business administration and external factors. The extant literature suggests that the relationships between many of the bid decision factors are orthogonal and may not explain how bid-decisions shape project outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

This knowledge gap has stagnated research in this area. Building on findings of recent studies, this study unbundles bid decision themes by analysing key factors amongst contractors' administrative characteristics. In addition, the study determines intrinsic predictive correlation between the sub-themes. A total of 17 variables were listed in a structured questionnaire survey and presented to participants recruited through purposive snowballing. In total, 50 responses were received and formed the basis of descriptive and inferential statistical analyses.

Findings

The study found that the 17 factors are significant in bid decisions and consequently in bid successes. However, the explanatory variables attached to the themes are most efficient if categorised into six sub-themes. These are contractor's administration depth, strategic direction, commercial intention and own market advantage, resources, experience as well as openness to technology imposed by new projects. Furthermore, four theoretical positions are significant. Contractors bid for projects strategically; they are less reliant on their resource capabilities in bid decisions; every bid decision aligns with a risk strategy, and financial stability enables them to establish appropriate risk mitigation arrangements that could ensure project success.

Originality/value

These findings provide some support for the conceptual premise that bid decisions need to be rational, considered and strategically contribute to project outcomes.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Fahimeh Zaeri, James Olabode Bamidele Rotimi, M. Reza Hosseini and Jeff Cox

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the implementation challenges of one of lean construction’s recent tools, the last planner system (LPS), by exploring issues in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the implementation challenges of one of lean construction’s recent tools, the last planner system (LPS), by exploring issues in the New Zealand construction sector to identify potential areas for improvement. To achieve this aim, the study formulated two objectives: to present the challenges in LPS use and to explore solutions by using an Excel spreadsheet for facilitating LPS applications.

Design/methodology/approach

The study drew primarily upon a case study approach. A fieldwork study and document analysis of a New Zealand construction project were conducted with an extensive literature review undertaken on the LPS concept.

Findings

The findings revealed that although an automated spreadsheet could be a simple and inexpensive option for using the LPS, data collection, storage and transfer into the spreadsheet could significantly influence the reliability of the LPS outcomes. Most data utilisation challenges were found to occur around the three data sets included in the weekly work plan (WWP). The study presented several automation solutions which had been applied to overcome data utilisation challenges.

Originality/value

Among the first of its kind in the construction industry, this study, with its first-hand account of an organisation which uses the lean paradigm, provides an in-depth insight into LPS tool implementation. The study extends the current body of knowledge by unearthing the challenges of LPS integration into construction activities and presenting efforts undertaken in a construction case project to overcome relevant issues. This adds value by enhancing the reliability of the LPS and, consequently, the effectiveness of its implementation in practical terms.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 September 2021

Abimbola Windapo, Abdulrauf Adediran, James Olabode Bamidele Rotimi and Nnedinma Umeokafor

This study aims to investigate whether clients’ knowledge about construction procurement systems influence project performance objectives and the role of procurement…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate whether clients’ knowledge about construction procurement systems influence project performance objectives and the role of procurement systems on project performance objectives in South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a two-round survey, 90 usable questionnaires from construction professionals in South Africa plus 3 expert clients were collected. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics – means, percentages and the analytical hierarchy process to determine the rank of client project performance criteria, while inferential statistics – Pearson product-moment correlation was used in establishing the relationship between the level of clients’ knowledge and project performance.

Findings

It was found that the common procurement systems used are traditional, followed by management-oriented and integrated procurement systems. In addition, it emerged that client’s knowledge of procurement systems shows a positive relationship with the achievement of project performance objectives. Based on these findings, it is concluded that some procurement systems being selected by clients in South Africa are inappropriately selected. This is despite the emergence of more efficient procurement systems. If procurement systems are selected based on the knowledge of the client, it will give better chances of a successful project outcome.

Practical implications

The research suggests the need for clients to seek ways to improve their understanding or increase their knowledge of procurement systems in construction. Policymakers’ responsibilities in driving policies that will place responsibilities on clients to seek a reasonable way to improve their knowledge where possible is implied in the study.

Originality/value

It contributes to improving project performance by examining whether the level of knowledge possessed by a client influences project performance.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 July 2022

Achini Shanika Weerasinghe, Eziaku Onyeizu Rasheed and James Olabode Bamidele Rotimi

This paper aims to investigate building managers’ approach towards occupant energy behaviours and rationalises organisational energy culture concerning their strategy to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate building managers’ approach towards occupant energy behaviours and rationalises organisational energy culture concerning their strategy to address occupants’ preferences in New Zealand tertiary office buildings.

Design/methodology/approach

The research used grounded theory analysis by interviewing a purposive sample of 25 participants from a university. Also, semi-structured interviews were conducted with facilities managers, sustainability managers and building occupants.

Findings

The study results revealed that building managers oversimplify the multi-domain discomfort, energy impacts from occupant behaviours and the influence of social-psychology aspects on occupants’ actions. The organisational energy culture can be further improved by increasing occupants’ knowledge and awareness of energy, sharing energy feedback with occupants to make energy conscious occupants and giving them responsibilities to achieve the organisation’s energy targets.

Originality/value

This study enables opportunities to promote collaboration between building managers and occupants by comparing perspectives on occupant energy impacts.

Details

Facilities , vol. 40 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2021

Mohammad Vahdatmanesh, Afshin Firouzi and James Olabode Bamidele Rotimi

Post-disaster housing reconstruction (PDHR) demands a considerable percentage of global property investment, yet the post-disaster environment presents intricate…

Abstract

Purpose

Post-disaster housing reconstruction (PDHR) demands a considerable percentage of global property investment, yet the post-disaster environment presents intricate challenges to reconstruction financing for governments and at the same time, revenue uncertainty for private investors. The purpose of this study is to develop a methodology for tackling land shortage and the financial challenges of PDHR in the aftermath of a disaster.

Design/methodology/approach

This study developed a methodology based on a combined minimum revenue guarantee and maximum revenue cap model using a well-established real options analysis (ROA) for revenue risk sharing in PDHR projects and land readjustment (LR) for finance. The applicability of the purported model is demonstrated through an illustrative example.

Findings

The results show that flexibility in the options could increase the PDHR contractor’s risk profile by increasing the expected value of the contractor investment and reducing the probability of investment loss. On the other side, a cap on the contractor revenue stream would allow the government to benefit from any excess in revenue and would counterbalance the value of the option.

Practical implications

The framework proposed in this study could serve as a practical risk-revenue sharing in PDHR projects. Governments and policymakers could use the findings to enable the successful delivery of PDHR projects and consequently bring the quality of life of affected people to pre-disaster conditions.

Originality/value

This study can be considered as a first attempt toward the use of the Australian barrier style options structure, and the trinomial lattice valuation model in PDHR projects, which incorporates LR, public-private partnerships, governmental guarantees and PDHR concepts in one ROA-based framework.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction , vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 January 2021

Luqman Oyekunle Oyewobi, Olufemi Seth Olorunyomi, Richard Ajayi Jimoh and James Olabode Bamidele Rotimi

Many construction businesses are currently building and keeping social media pages for their enterprises to be visible to the public to improve their social interaction…

Abstract

Purpose

Many construction businesses are currently building and keeping social media pages for their enterprises to be visible to the public to improve their social interaction, promote business interest, build trust and relationships with their targeted audience on social media. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of social mediausage on performance of construction businesses (CBs) in Abuja, Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a quantitative research approach by identifying constructs that reveal three aspects of organisation’s physiognomies that impact the process of espousing, implementing and using technological innovations in conducting businesses. Well-structured questionnaire was used to obtain data from 113 purposively sampled building materials’ merchant operating in Dei-Dei Market, Abuja, Nigeria. This study used partial least squares structural equation modelling technique to establish the relationship among the constructs.

Findings

The results of this study indicated that technology has significant relationship with social media adoption, whereas social media adoption has a very strong positive impact on organisation’s performance (P < 0.001) with respect to improved customer relations and services and enhanced information accessibility.

Research limitations/implications

This study has implications for CBs that wish to adopt social media to promote their businesses by presenting to them the opportunity to understand the impact of technology, environment and organisational potential in improving business performance. This study is cross-sectional in nature, and this calls for caution in interpreting the results.

Originality/value

This paper developed and tested a conceptual framework presented to understand the interrelationships amongst the constructs, which would be of great significance to business owners in developing their social interaction and promote business interest via social media. The outcome of this research is beneficial to researchers to further study how the different social media tools could help in influencing business decisions.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction , vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

Keywords

1 – 10 of 20