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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2024

Jack Wei

Social media marketers are keen to understand how viewers perceive their brands on a platform and how the learning experiences from content can impact their attitudes toward a…

Abstract

Purpose

Social media marketers are keen to understand how viewers perceive their brands on a platform and how the learning experiences from content can impact their attitudes toward a brand. This study aims to focus on examining the effect of firm-generated content (FGC) on X (formerly known as Twitter), using Kolb’s experiential learning theory to analyze the viewers’ learning process. In addition, the study investigates how the length of time a viewer follows a brand and the type of brand can influence their attitudes toward it.

Design/methodology/approach

This study involved three qualitative studies on X to investigate how content learning affects consumer attitudes toward two brands, namely, Nike and Subway. The study also examined the impact of the duration of following the brands, with participants following the brands for 4, 8 and 12 weeks, respectively, to assess changes in their attitudes.

Findings

The results demonstrate that content learning significantly impacts consumer attitudes. By following brands and engaging with their FGC over time, viewers can transition from being occasional or intermittent followers to becoming devoted brand enthusiasts. Through the four-stage experiential learning process, followers undergo cognitive, emotional and behavioral transformations that collectively shape their brand attitudes. The impact of content learning varies according to the brand type, and the duration of following has a positive effect on brand attitudes.

Research limitations/implications

The study’s findings have significant marketing implications for social media marketers, suggesting that they should restructure their social media platforms as learning platforms to effectively engage followers. Companies should adjust their content marketing strategies from a learner’s perspective, providing followers with content that resonates with them, enhances their learning outcomes and helps shift their beliefs and brand attitudes, ultimately converting them into loyal consumers.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, this qualitative research is the first of its kind to apply experiential learning theories to investigate how users learn from FGC by following brands on social media and how this learning ultimately changes their brand attitude. The study provides a unique perspective on social media marketing, enriching the understanding of content marketing and consumer experiences on social media platforms.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 February 2020

Ruoshui Jiao and Jack Wei

One of the greatest challenges that global brands face as they expand into new markets and segments is overcoming social and cultural barriers that prevent them from being…

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Abstract

Purpose

One of the greatest challenges that global brands face as they expand into new markets and segments is overcoming social and cultural barriers that prevent them from being accepted by consumers. By drawing on theories of Mead’s prefigurative cultures, reverse socialization and symbolic interactionism, this paper aims to investigate the process of reverse socialization, the antecedents and its impact on parents’ attitude toward the reverse socialized brand.

Design/methodology/approach

Using in-depth interviewing method, data were collected from 20 Chinese consumers by capturing the accounts of both parents and their children involved in reverse socialization. The interpretive content analysis was used to study the data.

Findings

Reverse socialization exerts positive influence on brand attitude and facilitates parents’ adoption of the socialized brand. The brand has acquired additional symbolic meanings for Chinese consumers, which in turn enhances self-brand connections among them.

Practical implications

Managerial implications include strategies for cross-cultural marketers to maximize the acceptance of brands by elderly consumers through reverse socialization and efficiently expand the brands’ market into more segments.

Originality/value

As the first research of its kind (to the authors’ knowledge), the findings fill a gap in the marketing literature by demonstrating adult children’s influence on parents through reverse socialization.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Christina Ling-hsing Chang and Tung-Ching Lin

The purpose of the study is to focus on the enhancement of knowledge management (KM) performance and the relationship between organizational culture and KM process intention of…

35436

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to focus on the enhancement of knowledge management (KM) performance and the relationship between organizational culture and KM process intention of individuals because of the diversity of organizational cultures (which include results-oriented, tightly controlled, job-oriented, closed system and professional-oriented cultures). Knowledge is a primary resource in organizations. If firms are able to effectively manage their knowledge resources, then a wide range of benefits can be reaped such as improved corporate efficiency, effectiveness, innovation and customer service.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey methodology, which has the ability to enhance generalization of results (Dooley, 2001), was used to collect the data utilized in the testing of the research hypotheses.

Findings

Results- and job-oriented cultures have positive effects on employee intention in the KM process (creation, storage, transfer and application), whereas a tightly controlled culture has negative effects.

Research limitations/implications

However, it would have been better to use a longitudinal study to collect useful long-term data to understand how the KM process would be influenced when organizational culture dimensions are changed through/by management. This is the first limitation of this study. According to Mason and Pauleen (2003), KM culture is a powerful predictor of individual knowledge-sharing behavior, which is not included in this study. Thus, this is the second limitation of this paper. Moreover, national culture could be an important issue in the KM process (Jacks et al., 2012), which is the third limitation of this paper for not comprising it.

Practical implications

In researchers’ point of view, results- and job-oriented cultures have positive effects, whereas a tightly controlled culture has a negative effect on the KM process intention of the individual. These findings provide evidences that challenge the perspective of Kayworth and Leidner (2003) on this issue. As for practitioners, management has a direction to modify their organizational culture to improve the performance of KM process.

Social implications

Both behavioral and value perspectives of the organizational cultural dimensions (results-oriented, tightly control, job-oriented, sociability, solidarity, need for achievement and democracy) should be examined to ascertain their effects firstly on KM culture and then on the KM process intention of the individual. It is hoped that the current study will spawn future investigations that lead to the development of an integrated model which includes organizational culture, KM culture and the KM process intention of the individual.

Originality/value

The results-oriented, loosely controlled and job-oriented cultures will improve the effectiveness of the KM process and will also increase employees’ satisfaction and willingness to stay with the organization.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2009

Chung-Chi Wu, Ching-Tang James Wang, Hsiou-Hsiang Jack Liu and Wei-Ching Wang

The purpose of this article is to explore the three types of water-based recreationists' (nonmotorized, motorized, and dual participants) perception on recreation conflict as well…

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to explore the three types of water-based recreationists' (nonmotorized, motorized, and dual participants) perception on recreation conflict as well as their use of coping mechanisms and further understand the influence of specialization level on their choice of coping mechanism. Recreationists were divided into three groups based on the concept of experience use history. Data were collected between June and September 2007 at entry of five intra-site water recreation areas with every five individuals selected. Study findings partly supported the predictive relationships. Among all three groups (motorized, nonmotorized, and dual participants), less conflict was reported for nonmotorized participants than motored participants. Moreover, the data also suggest that coping mechanisms are widely employed in outdoor recreation. Implications for future research and practice were discussed.

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-675-1

Article
Publication date: 6 December 2023

Labeeba Kothur and Vidushi Pandey

This paper aims to investigate the mechanisms through which social media news consumption across different platforms leads to opinion polarization in society. To this end, the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the mechanisms through which social media news consumption across different platforms leads to opinion polarization in society. To this end, the authors draw from cultivation theory to examine whether social media news consumption imparts a mainstreaming or resonance effect. Media consumption imparts a mainstreaming effect if frequent users, regardless of their social identity, develop homogenous attitudes about issues, whereas resonance is at play if there is a differing cultivation effect on various social groups depending on their relatability of life experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conduct the study in the developing context of India, using a population survey dataset from 2019. Regression-based mediation and moderation analyses were carried out to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The findings reveal that resonance is the most prominent mechanism through which social media news consumption cultivates opinion polarization, contrary to the mainstreaming effect imparted by television. Further, WhatsApp use was found to strengthen the polarizing effect of overall social media news consumption, while YouTube use weakened the cultivation of polarization.

Research limitations/implications

The paper unearths how social media news consumption influences the opinion polarization of various social groups differently. The authors also find the differential effect of specific platform use. These findings have the potential to inform policymakers and developers about how to mitigate the detrimental effects of platform-based political persuasion.

Originality/value

This study offers significant contributions. First, the authors explain social media-induced polarization using the novel theoretical lens of cultivation. Second, the authors find that social media and television news consumption differ in their polarizing effects. Third, the authors find that while WhatsApp use amplifies the polarizing effect of social media news consumption, YouTube use weakens it.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Super-Sticky Wechat and Chinese Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-091-4

Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Srinivasan Raghavan, Mui Ling Sharon Nai, Pan Wang, Wai Jack Sin, Tao Li and Jun Wei

The paper presents a wide range of post processing heat treatment cycles performed to Electron Beam Melted (EBM) Ti6Al4V alloy and establishes correlations of heat treat process…

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Abstract

Purpose

The paper presents a wide range of post processing heat treatment cycles performed to Electron Beam Melted (EBM) Ti6Al4V alloy and establishes correlations of heat treat process to microstructure and mechanical property (microhardness). The research also identifies the optimal heat treatment to obtain the best microstructure and mechanical properties (hardness and tensile).

Design/methodology/approach

Rectangular bars fabricated using EBM was used to study the different heat treatment cycles. A variety of heat treatments from sub ß-transus, super ß-transus, near ß-transus and solution aircool plus ageing were designed. After the heat treatment process, the samples were analysed for, α lath width, prior ß grain size, microhardness and nanohardness. Tensile tests were done for the heat treated samples showing most refined α lath structure with uniform globular grains.

Findings

A clear correlation was observed between α lath width and the microhardness values. The solution aircooled plus aged samples exhibited the best refinement in α-ß morphology with uniform equiaxed grains. The tensile properties of the solution aircooled plus aged samples were comparable to that of the EBM printed samples and better than ASTMF1472 specifications.

Originality/value

There is hardly any prior work related to post processing heat treatment of EBM built Ti6Al4V other than HIP treatments. The variety of heat treatment cycles and its influence in microstructure and properties, studied in this research, gives a clear understanding on how to tailor final microstructures and select the optimal heat treatment process.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Stories and Lessons from the World's Leading Opera, Orchestra Librarians, and Music Archivists, Volume 1: North and South America
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-653-8

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Louise‐Jayne Edwards and Elizabeth J. Muir

This paper is a critique of the “Enterprise in Education” initiative, which has been implemented, supported and developed at the University of Glamorgan. The purpose of the paper…

2953

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is a critique of the “Enterprise in Education” initiative, which has been implemented, supported and developed at the University of Glamorgan. The purpose of the paper is to critique the initiative so that best practice in enterprise education can be identified and embedded in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology for this paper was to review the related literature and use this to identify conceptual frameworks relating to entrepreneurial learning; distinguish between “for” and “about” entrepreneurship courses and better understand the informal learning experience. This was then followed by reflective critical analysis of the formal and informal learning activities at the university.

Findings

The analysis supports the notion that lack of support, resources and finance are barriers to self‐employment and access to entrepreneurial learning. Even with funded support for their learning, undergraduates are likely to face the barrier of lack of work experience and suggest postgraduate study as the space for “for” entrepreneurship courses. But whatever level of study there is a need for a seamless provision of “formal” and “informal” entrepreneurial learning.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst there is a need for longitudinal studies relating entrepreneurial learning with entrepreneurial activity and sustainability, some of the outcomes of this case study have been fed into policy and practice: the continuation and further development of specialist “for” entrepreneurship courses at postgraduate level.

Originality/value

This paper provides a case study of entrepreneurial learning in the university context and as such will be valuable to those developing courses in the field of entrepreneurship and those involved in developing university policy surrounding entrepreneurial learning.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 June 2021

Fernando Angulo-Ruiz, Albena Pergelova and William X. Wei

This research aims to assess variations of motivations when studying international location decisions. In particular, this study aims to assess the influence of diverse…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to assess variations of motivations when studying international location decisions. In particular, this study aims to assess the influence of diverse motivations – seeking technology, seeking brand assets, seeking markets, seeking resources and escaping institutional constraints – as determinants of the international location choice of emerging market multinational enterprises (EM MNEs) entering least developed, emerging, and developed countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop a set of hypotheses based on the ownership–location–internalization framework and complement it with an institutional perspective. The conceptual model posits that the different internationalization motivations (seeking technology, seeking brand assets, seeking markets, seeking resources and escaping institutional constraints) will impact the location choice of EM MNEs in developed economies, emerging markets or least developed countries. This study uses the 2013 survey data collected by the China Council for the Promotion of International Trade and the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada. The final sample of analysis of this research includes 693 observations.

Findings

After controlling for several variables, two-stage Heckman regressions show there is a variation of motivations when EM MNEs enter least developed countries, emerging markets and developed economies. EM MNEs are motivated to enter least developed countries to seek markets and resources. Conversely, those firms enter developed countries in their search for technological assets and to escape institutional constraints at home. While the present study findings show a clear difference in the motivations that lead to location choice in least developed vs developed countries, the results are not as clear for location in other emerging countries.

Research limitations/implications

The paper offers empirical support for the importance of motivations as crucial determinants of location choice.

Originality/value

This paper provides a detailed quantitative study on the internationalization location choice of EM MNEs based on their motivations. Though theoretical models underscore the importance of motivations, we know very little about how, in practice, motivations drive location choice. This study contributes to the international location choice literature a deeper understanding of how diverse motivations drive choices of expansion into developed economies, emerging markets or least developed countries.

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