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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Yu Kyoung Park, Ji Hoon Song, Seung Won Yoon and Jungwoo Kim

– The purpose of this study is to investigate the mediating effect of work engagement on the relationship between learning organization and innovative behavior.

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7828

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the mediating effect of work engagement on the relationship between learning organization and innovative behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used surveys as a data collection tool and implemented structural equation modeling for empirically testing the proposed research model.

Findings

The study found that learning organization culture makes a direct and indirect impact on employees' innovative work behaviors. Results from hierarchical multiple regressions and structural equation modeling supported that work engagement fully mediates the relationship between the learning organization and innovative work behaviors.

Practical implications

HRD practitioners can develop effective interventions to enhance their employees' innovative behavior by devoting efforts to create a workplace that promotes collaborative learning culture and work engagement.

Originality/value

This study is valuable to HRD specialists interested in developing effective interventions that encourage employees to engage in innovative behavior.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 38 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Tara Fenwick

Innovation is argued here to be a significant and complex dimension of learning in work, involving a mix of rational, intuitive, emotional and social processes embedded in…

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2682

Abstract

Innovation is argued here to be a significant and complex dimension of learning in work, involving a mix of rational, intuitive, emotional and social processes embedded in activities of a particular community of practice. Dimensions of innovative learning are suggested to include level (individual, group, organization), rhythm (episodic or continuous), and magnitude of creative change (adaptive or generative) involved in the learning process. Drawing from a study of women who leave organizational employment to develop an enterprise of self‐employment, this article explores these dimensions of innovative learning. Two questions guide the analysis: what conditions foster innovative learning; and what are the forms and processes of the innovative learning process? Findings suggest that innovative processes involve multiple strategies and demand conditions of freedom, patience, support, and recognition.

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Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2020

Rima'a Da'as, Abeer Watted and Miri Barak

The study aims to test an innovative model that explores the direct and indirect relationships between principals' innovative behavior, climate of organizational learning

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to test an innovative model that explores the direct and indirect relationships between principals' innovative behavior, climate of organizational learning and a teacher's intent to leave his or her school and take a voluntary absence.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a survey of 1,529 teachers from 107 Arab elementary schools randomly selected from the database of the Israeli educational system. To test the proposed multilevel model, we conducted multilevel structural equation modeling (ML-SEM).

Findings

The analysis confirmed that organizational learning climate is a prominent mediator between principals' innovative behavior and a teacher's intent to leave and his/her voluntary absence.

Originality/value

This research advances our understanding of leaders' innovative construct in an educational context and adds to the body of research directed at identifying administrative support and work-related factors that may negatively relate to a teacher's absenteeism or intent to leave and are amenable to leadership intervention.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 34 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2018

Dong Seop Chung and Jinxi Michelle Li

The purpose of this paper is to examine the potential consequences of transformational leadership on follower innovative behavior as well as to investigate the moderating…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the potential consequences of transformational leadership on follower innovative behavior as well as to investigate the moderating effect of team learning on the relationship. It is argued that an excessive level of transformational leadership may even decrease the subordinates’ innovative behavior due to their negative emotions derived from the leadership, while an appropriate level of transformational leadership can positively influence innovative behavior. Furthermore, the situational factor of team learning, which reinforces the positive feelings of team members through their improved competency, can amplify the positive impact and diminish the negative impact of transformational leadership on innovative behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from R&D teams of large- and mid-sized companies in Korean industries. Survey data from 307 team members and 51 team leaders from 51 project teams were tested using hierarchical linear modeling analysis. Team members evaluated the transformational leadership of their team leaders as well as the perceived level of learning in their teams, and team leaders evaluated the innovative behavior of their team members.

Findings

Multi-level analysis confirmed a non-linear relationship (an inverted U shape) between transformational leadership of team leaders and innovative behavior of team members. It means innovative behavior was negatively related to excessive transformational leadership and positively related to a modest level of the leadership. Furthermore, statistical analysis confirmed the positive multi-level moderating effect of team learning.

Research limitations/implications

The core dimension of transformational leadership, charisma, was the only measurement of the leadership in this study. Most South Korean companies adopted performance-based compensation systems and charisma is a prevailing leadership behavior at emerging market of the nation. As such, other dimensions of transformational leadership such as “individualized consideration” or “intellectual stimulation” are relatively neglected in most companies of South Korea. Future research needs to consider these other dimensions for the generalization in research.

Practical implications

Leaders in emerging markets, such as project team leaders or R&D team leaders, should avoid immoderate transformational leadership and should maintain a proper level of transformational leadership. The contemporary leaders also need to utilize team learning to maximize innovative behavior.

Originality/value

These findings illustrate the disadvantage of excessive transformational leadership and highlight the neutralization effect of team learning on the negative impact of the excessive leadership. Team learning has the potential to enhance members’ innovative behaviors, and it could moderate the perceptions of excessive transformational leadership.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Liat Eldor

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between perceptions of learning climate and employee innovative behavior and proficiency.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between perceptions of learning climate and employee innovative behavior and proficiency.

Design/methodology/approach

Using robust analysis techniques on data from a sample of 419 employees and their supervisors from four different business and public sector organizations, the author tested the proposed relationships, as mediated by job engagement. Moreover, this mediation effect was examined in the light of sector of employment differences (business vs public).

Findings

The results were generally consistent with the hypothesized conceptual scheme, in that the indirect relationship between perceptions of learning climate and employees’ innovative behavior and proficiency was mediated by job engagement. However, with regard to sector employment differences, this mediation process was demonstrated among business sector employees only to the relationship between perceptions of learning climate and innovative behavior. When proficiency was included in the mediation model, this mediation effect was evident among public sector employees.

Originality/value

The research on perceptions of learning climate lacks empirical evidence on its implications for employees’ innovative behavior and proficiency. Although scholars contend that employees’ perceptions of learning climate should enhance their in-role and extra-role performance behaviors, these arguments are mainly non-empirical. Understanding whether perceptions of learning have an impact on employee intra- and extra-role performance behaviors is important, considering that the majority of workplace learning occurs through daily ongoing means that are part of the working environment and previous research results show that structured learning and formal training are less effective in improving employees’ performance at work.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Loek F.M. Nieuwenhuis

Innovation is a complex process, based on interactive network learning and processes of trial and error on the shop floor. Small companies, such as in agriculture, are…

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4939

Abstract

Innovation is a complex process, based on interactive network learning and processes of trial and error on the shop floor. Small companies, such as in agriculture, are depending on external knowledge infrastructures for effective innovation. Within small companies, the entrepreneur has a pivotal role in the innovative process: the entrepreneur is the professional learner. Learning and innovation as major parts of entrepreneurship are central to this contribution. How do farmers learn and innovate within a market‐led, high‐tech agricultural sector and what should governmental policy look like to support and facilitate innovation, avoiding the pitfall of protectionism? Two case studies are presented: one on linear innovation policy and one on learning processes of farmers. Innovative learning is balancing between the chaos of uncertainty and the old grooves of experience. Knowing how to escape this paradox forms the core competence of innovative entrepreneurship.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Peter Serdyukov

The purpose of this paper is to present an analytical review of the educational innovation field in the USA. It outlines classification of innovations, discusses the…

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244557

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an analytical review of the educational innovation field in the USA. It outlines classification of innovations, discusses the hurdles to innovation, and offers ways to increase the scale and rate of innovation-based transformations in the education system.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a literature survey and author research.

Findings

US education badly needs effective innovations of scale that can help produce the needed high-quality learning outcomes across the system. The primary focus of educational innovations should be on teaching and learning theory and practice, as well as on the learner, parents, community, society, and its culture. Technology applications need a solid theoretical foundation based on purposeful, systemic research, and a sound pedagogy. One of the critical areas of research and innovation can be cost and time efficiency of the learning.

Practical implications

Several practical recommendations stem out of this paper: how to create a base for large-scale innovations and their implementation; how to increase effectiveness of technology innovations in education, particularly online learning; how to raise time and cost efficiency of education.

Social implications

Innovations in education are regarded, along with the education system, within the context of a societal supersystem demonstrating their interrelations and interdependencies at all levels. Raising the quality and scale of innovations in education will positively affect education itself and benefit the whole society.

Originality/value

Originality is in the systemic approach to education and educational innovations, in offering a comprehensive classification of innovations; in exposing the hurdles to innovations, in new arguments about effectiveness of technology applications, and in time efficiency of education.

Details

Journal of Research in Innovative Teaching & Learning, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-7604

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2021

Kelum Jayasinghe

This study aims to address the possibility of integrating some elements of the “radical constructivist” approach to management accounting teaching. It answers the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to address the possibility of integrating some elements of the “radical constructivist” approach to management accounting teaching. It answers the following two questions: to what extent should management accounting educators construct a “radical constructivist” foundation to guide active learning? Then, in which ways can management accounting educators use qualitative methods to facilitate “radical constructivist” education?

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a teaching cycle that implements innovative learning elements, e.g. learning from ordinary people, designed following the principles of “radical constructivism”, to engage students with “externalities” at the centre of their knowledge construction. It adopts an ethnographic approach comprising interviews and participant observation for the data collection, followed by the application of qualitative content and narrative analysis of the data.

Findings

The study findings and reflections illustrate that the majority of students respond positively to radical constructivist learning if the educators can develop an innovative problem-solving and authentic environment that is close to their real lives. The radical constructivist teaching cycle discussed in this study has challenged the mindsets of the management accounting students as it altered the traditional objectivist academic learning approaches that students were familiar with. Its use of qualitative methods facilitated active learning. Student feedback was sought as part of the qualitative design, which provided a constructive mechanism for the students and educators to learn and unlearn from their mistakes. This process enriched the understanding of learners (students) and educators of successful engagement in radical constructivist management accounting education and provides a base upon which to design future teaching cycles.

Originality/value

The paper provides proof of the ability of accounting educators, as change agents, to apply radical constructivist epistemology combined with multiple qualitative research methods by creating new constructive learning structures and cultures associated with innovative deep-learning tasks in management accounting education.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

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Article
Publication date: 24 March 2021

Natalya Sergeeva and Meri Duryan

This paper aims to explore the ways innovation becomes enabled through knowledge management and sharing which has important implications for establishing and sustaining…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the ways innovation becomes enabled through knowledge management and sharing which has important implications for establishing and sustaining the culture of innovative thinking in project-based construction firms. This study adopts a reflective practitioner perspective to explore this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 30 semi-structured interviews were conducted with the construction sector professionals whose roles are most relevant in the connection between innovation and knowledge management. Thematic analysis and cognitive mapping techniques were used to analyse the interview data.

Findings

The research findings indicate that due to the complexity of project-based construction firms, a more holistic approach to knowledge management and organisational learning at the firm level is required. This would enable a culture of continuous and coordinated knowledge flow that facilitates innovation and continuous improvement in project-based firms.

Practical implications

This paper has important implications for practising managers in project-based construction firms. By better understanding the ways organisational knowledge can be managed to become an enabler of innovation would allow to build and enhance firms’ innovative capabilities, individual and team competencies. There is a real need for innovation knowledge managers as formal job positions in the construction sector.

Originality/value

This study contributes to construction innovation and project management research and practice by providing insights into establishing and sustaining the culture of learning and innovative thinking.

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Kurt Squire

This paper (published in two consecutive issues of On the Horizon) aims to contextualize research on games for learning by describing the current drivers of innovation in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper (published in two consecutive issues of On the Horizon) aims to contextualize research on games for learning by describing the current drivers of innovation in learning technologies situated within broader trends in open educational publishing.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper begins with an overview of changes, driven largely by technology in educational technology and publishing. Using massively open online courseware as an example, it describes how these factors are aligning to challenge the status quo. Next, it provides a brief discussion of changes in higher education more generally, including changes in education as a marketplace, reductions to state funding for education and changes in the research enterprise, particularly the rapid growth of the scientific enterprise and leveling off of federal support.

Findings

The paper pivots to describe the most recent chapter of over 15 years of work within the Games + Learning + Society (GLS) Center, which has sought to create innovative models of learning, innovative models for funding and conducting research in light of these challenges, and innovative ways of engaging the public.

Practical implications

The assumption driving GLS (and this paper) is that rather than wait for these changes to happen to us, educational technologists can help drive the future by creating it. A good way to get the kinds of learning systems we want is to go about creating them and seeing what works. During this time, GLS developed and released over a dozen game-based learning titles, raised US$10,000,000s in grants and contracts, graduated over 30 doctoral students and post docs, spun out multiple companies, created materials in use by 10,000s (or more) students across the world, and helped build a nascent field of games and learning.

Originality/value

The paper pivots to describe the most recent chapter of over 15 years of work within the GLS Center, which has sought to create innovative models of learning, innovative models for funding and conducting research in light of these challenges and innovative ways of engaging the public.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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