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Book part
Publication date: 8 April 2005

Fredrik von Corswant

This paper deals with the organizing of interactive product development. Developing products in interaction between firms may provide benefits in terms of specialization…

Abstract

This paper deals with the organizing of interactive product development. Developing products in interaction between firms may provide benefits in terms of specialization, increased innovation, and possibilities to perform development activities in parallel. However, the differentiation of product development among a number of firms also implies that various dependencies need to be dealt with across firm boundaries. How dependencies may be dealt with across firms is related to how product development is organized. The purpose of the paper is to explore dependencies and how interactive product development may be organized with regard to these dependencies.

The analytical framework is based on the industrial network approach, and deals with the development of products in terms of adaptation and combination of heterogeneous resources. There are dependencies between resources, that is, they are embedded, implying that no resource can be developed in isolation. The characteristics of and dependencies related to four main categories of resources (products, production facilities, business units and business relationships) provide a basis for analyzing the organizing of interactive product development.

Three in-depth case studies are used to explore the organizing of interactive product development with regard to dependencies. The first two cases are based on the development of the electrical system and the seats for Volvo’s large car platform (P2), performed in interaction with Delphi and Lear respectively. The third case is based on the interaction between Scania and Dayco/DFC Tech for the development of various pipes and hoses for a new truck model.

The analysis is focused on what different dependencies the firms considered and dealt with, and how product development was organized with regard to these dependencies. It is concluded that there is a complex and dynamic pattern of dependencies that reaches far beyond the developed product as well as beyond individual business units. To deal with these dependencies, development may be organized in teams where several business units are represented. This enables interaction between different business units’ resource collections, which is important for resource adaptation as well as for innovation. The delimiting and relating functions of the team boundary are elaborated upon and it is argued that also teams may be regarded as actors. It is also concluded that a modular product structure may entail a modular organization with regard to the teams, though, interaction between business units and teams is needed. A strong connection between the technical structure and the organizational structure is identified and it is concluded that policies regarding the technical structure (e.g. concerning “carry-over”) cannot be separated from the management of the organizational structure (e.g. the supplier structure). The organizing of product development is in itself a complex and dynamic task that needs to be subject to interaction between business units.

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Managing Product Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-311-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

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Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

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Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2019

Nima Gerami Seresht and Aminah Robinson Fayek

Due to its key role in the successful delivery of construction projects, construction productivity is one of the most researched topics in construction domain. While the…

Abstract

Purpose

Due to its key role in the successful delivery of construction projects, construction productivity is one of the most researched topics in construction domain. While the majority of previous research is focused on the productivity of labor-intensive activities, there is a lack of research on the productivity of equipment-intensive activities. The purpose of this paper is to address this research gap by developing a comprehensive list of factors influencing the productivity of equipment-intensive activities and determining the most influential factors through interview surveys.

Design/methodology/approach

A list of 201 factors influencing the productivity of equipment-intensive activities was developed through the review of 287 articles, selected from the ten top-ranked construction journals, by searching for construction productivity in the articles’ titles, abstracts or keywords. Next, the most influential factors were determined by conducting interview surveys with 35 construction experts. To ensure that the interviewees were aware of the research objectives and the distinction between labor- and equipment-intensive activities, an information session was held prior to conducting the surveys, and the surveys were conducted in interview format to allow for clarification and discussion throughout the process.

Findings

Project management respondents identified foreman-, safety- and crew-related factors as the categories with the most influence on productivity; tradespeople respondents identified foreman-, equipment- and crew-related factors as the most influential categories. In total, 14 factors were identified, for which there was a significant difference between the perspectives of project management and tradespeople regarding the factors’ influence on productivity.

Originality/value

This paper provides a comprehensive list of factors influencing the productivity of equipment-intensive activities. It identifies the most influential factors through an interview survey of 35 construction experts, who are familiar with the challenges of equipment-intensive activities based on their experience with such activities in the industrial construction sector of Alberta, Canada. Additionally, the differences between the factors that influence the productivity of labor- and equipment-intensive activities are discussed by comparing the findings of this paper with previous research focused on labor intensive activities.

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International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 69 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Lan Xia and Kent B. Monroe

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Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-723-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Mehdi Taghian, Clare D’Souza and Michael Polonsky

This paper aims to investigate business managers’ assessment of stakeholders’ influence on corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives. The key stakeholders included…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate business managers’ assessment of stakeholders’ influence on corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives. The key stakeholders included “employees” and “unions” as internal and “public”, the “media” and the “government” as external stakeholders. The purpose was to estimate the influence of stakeholders that managers perceive as important. Moreover, the study sought to identify association between the CSR construct and corporate reputation and in turn whether this influences business performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a mail survey with a random sampling of senior managers sourced from Dun & Bradstreet’s Australian business database, focusing on large organizations (i.e. minimum $10 million p.a. reported sales and minimum 100 employees) as the selection criteria. A conceptual model was developed and tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results identified that “employees” and the “public” are perceived to be the influential stakeholder groups in CSR decision-making. There was evidence of a positive relationship between the CSR construct and reputation, which in turn influenced market share, but not profitability.

Research limitations/implications

This study examined a cross-section of organizations using Dun & Bradstreet’s database of Australian businesses and may not fully represent the Australian business mix. The effective response rate of 7.2 per cent appears to be low, even though it is comparable with other research in the CSR area. There may have been some self-selection by the respondents, although there were no statistically significant differences identified in the corporate characteristics of those invited to participate and those responding with usable questionnaires.

Practical implications

Managers can adopt a stakeholder-influenced CSR strategy to generate strong corporate reputation to improve business performance. It is important to ensure that the interests of “employees” and “public” stakeholders are addressed within organizational strategy. Respondents were less concerned about government stakeholders and thus government involvement in organizational CSR may need to be revisited.

Social implications

The major concern that emerges from these findings is the absence of the perceived importance of regulatory stakeholders on firms’ CSR activities. Regulatory controls of CSR messages could reduce or eliminate inaccurate and misleading information to the public.

Originality/value

The analysis explains the perceived relative influence of stakeholders on CSR decisions. It also provides an understanding of the link between organizational CSR reputation and organization’s performance.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

Sonia Sadeghian Esfahani, Stephen Cahoon, Shu-Ling Chen, Hilary Pateman and Seyed Mojtaba Sajadi

This paper aims to examine 12 factors influencing environmental activity adoption by Australian logistics companies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine 12 factors influencing environmental activity adoption by Australian logistics companies.

Design/methodology/approach

After a literature review and collect the major factors influencing environmental activity adoption, exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and Friedman test are used to cluster and prioritize these factors through a Web survey.

Findings

The results of EFA show that these factors belong to three main groups including social and economic, pressure and governmental factors. The results of a Friedman test prioritizes 12 factors to find which factors have the greatest importance toward the adoption of environmental activity by managers of Australian logistics companies and reveals that governmental regulation, fuel and energy prices and the potential for achieving a competitive advantage, had the first to third ranking, respectively. Some new influencing factors in implementing environmental activities are found such as the willingness to be the market leader, responsibility and risk mitigation.

Research limitations/implications

This paper contributes to the literature by exploring the new factors influencing environmental adoption.

Practical implications

Australian logistics managers can use the results of this paper in developing their strategies and public policymakers can also use these results to improve sustainable development.

Originality/value

This is the first paper that clusters and prioritizes factors influencing environmental adoption in the Australian logistics industry.

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Maritime Business Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-3757

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Heeyoung Jang and Ilsang Ko

The objective of this study is to identify the factors that affect CoP activation and performance variables obtainable through CoP activities, and to gain greater insight

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this study is to identify the factors that affect CoP activation and performance variables obtainable through CoP activities, and to gain greater insight into their relationships and the mechanisms. In particular, this paper intends to illustrate the role of perceived risk factor for the loss of uniqueness of one's own knowledge in terms of their influence on CoP activities.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, the human behaviours were divided into online and offline CoP activities and adopted affirmative affect and social norm from the Triandis model. In addition, the paper considered perceived expectation, perceived risk, and organization support as independent variables. These would accelerate online and offline activities in the community of practice. The paper considered relationship commitment and individual performance in the context of performance evaluations via CoP activities. A structural equation model was developed with research variables and hypotheses.

Findings

As the consequence of the empirical assessment of the variables influencing the on/offline activities of a CoP, social norm, perceived expectation, perceived risk, and organizational support showed significantly influential relationships with online activities, and affirmative affect, perceived expectation, and organizational support evidenced significantly influential relationships with offline activities. However, with regard to online CoP activities, affirmative affect was not shown to be significant. As to offline activities, perceived risk was not shown to be significantly influential, while it was determined to significantly influence online activities in a negative direction.

Originality/value

The results of this study demonstrated that on/offline CoP activities were significantly influential in terms both of relationship commitment and individual performance.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This…

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Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

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Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 26 August 2014

Lin Song and Christoph Winkler

The purpose of this article is to analyze the supply (technology, education, labour, unemployment and real estate development) and demand (fiscal revenue and resident…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to analyze the supply (technology, education, labour, unemployment and real estate development) and demand (fiscal revenue and resident income) factors that influence regional entrepreneurial activity in China. Entrepreneurship develops at a rapid pace in China with significant differences among the country’s regions.

Design/methodology/approach

Statistics of 31 Chinese provinces from 2005 to 2010 were collected, and an econometric model of the panel data was established.

Findings

Empirical results show that technology and employment positively impact on regional entrepreneurial activity. A subsequent analysis comparing data from 2005-2008 to 2009-2010 showed that different variables on regional entrepreneurship weaken during a period of financial crisis, with technology remaining as the only significant variable across all models. Finally, the study summarizes China’s entrepreneurial activity as primarily supply-driven.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited by the data sources and index design, which may not fully capture all influences on regional entrepreneurship to determine whether an inflection point or other interaction mechanisms exist.

Practical implications

The study demonstrates a differential emphasis on the impact of economic supply factors in a developing economy to positively affect entrepreneurial activities and sustained economic growth at the regional level. Conversely, it can be inferred that increased government spending during an economic crisis positively influences regional entrepreneurial activities.

Originality/value

The study contributes toward the development of a theoretical framework that emphasizes the relationship between entrepreneurial activities and its regional supply and demand factors. The overall model and findings highlight technology’s importance on the development of innovation clusters that spur industrial agglomeration.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Swarna Weerasinghe and Matthew Numer

This article presents a study of the social, emotional and physical health lifestyle behaviours of a socially marginalised segment of Canada's population: retired…

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Abstract

This article presents a study of the social, emotional and physical health lifestyle behaviours of a socially marginalised segment of Canada's population: retired, widowed, immigrant mothers from a South Asian country. Using a narrative research process, we explore how present physical, emotional and social health leisure activities are influenced by behaviours from their childhood, with emphasis on migration to Canada, retirement and widowing as lifestyle behavioural change points. Our sample of immigrant women were living in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada during the time of the study. The study employed narrative inquiry, which is often used in migration studies. Our qualitative data analyses uncovered themes that linked present social health activities and early life behaviours and the influence on them of cultural constraints or stimulants. Three forms of sociocultural influences, gender segregation, patriarchal protection and early preparation for marriage, shaped adolescence and adult life as less physically active but more emotionally and socially healthy. Later life events, migration, retirement and widowing, enabled women to gain freedom to renegotiate and reconstruct late‐life styles to be more physically and socially active through ethno‐cultural social networks they had built after migration. The concluding discussion makes recommendations for health and social programme planning to draw attention to cultural realms that could help these women become physically active after migration without compromising traditional social behaviours.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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