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1 – 10 of over 4000
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

D. Howard Green, Malcolm Shaw and Faye Hammill

Reviews the origins of the MRes – the research masters programme developed in the mid‐1990s as a result of pressure to provide research students with a broader based training in…

Abstract

Reviews the origins of the MRes – the research masters programme developed in the mid‐1990s as a result of pressure to provide research students with a broader based training in research before embarking on a PhD or industrial research career. Notes the variation in the implementation of the MRes across a range of science‐based programmes observing the diversity, innovation and approach to skills training. The implications of recent and current national developments promoted by the Government, the QAA and the research councils are considered briefly. Finally the paper reflects on the role that the MRes might play in the further development of research training in doctoral programmes in the UK.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1973

Anthony P. Harvey

This column inaugurates a new facet of the coverage of reference materials contained in RSR: the inclusion of sections devoted to reviews of useful reference books published…

Abstract

This column inaugurates a new facet of the coverage of reference materials contained in RSR: the inclusion of sections devoted to reviews of useful reference books published around the world. Inasmuch as RSR's emphasis is on American reference sources and American libraries, the titles selected for evaluation were chosen on the basis of their appeal and relevance to libraries both in the U.S. and in other countries.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Book part
Publication date: 29 June 2016

Mickey Losinski and Robin Parks Ennis

Repetitive and restrictive behaviors are one of the core components of diagnosing a child with an autism spectrum disorder. These behaviors may take the form of repetitive motor…

Abstract

Repetitive and restrictive behaviors are one of the core components of diagnosing a child with an autism spectrum disorder. These behaviors may take the form of repetitive motor movements or vocalizations, often referred to as stereotypical behaviors. These behaviors can impede the child’s educational and social opportunities, and have thus become a target for intervention. A variety of interventions have been used to reduce stereotypical behaviors with varied success. One of the most oft-used interventions is deep pressure therapy (e.g., weighted vests), a practice that enjoys substantial anecdotal but little empirical support. Conversely, interventions based on functional behavior assessment (FBA) have been shown to reduce these behaviors, but may not be used frequently within schools. Therefore, this chapter will provide a brief overview of stereotypical behaviors and compare these two intervention approaches, with a clear preference for FBA-based interventions due to their stronger empirical support.

Details

Instructional Practices with and without Empirical Validity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-125-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2020

David Newsome

This paper aims to provide a readily accessible synopsis of a complex subject and consider sustainability from a personal experiential level right through to a big picture study…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a readily accessible synopsis of a complex subject and consider sustainability from a personal experiential level right through to a big picture study in the context of sustainable cities.

Design/methodology/approach

A combination of personal experiences, on-line sources and research papers were used to trace the complex human dilemma of achieving sustainability in city environments. Although a difficult task for many people to embrace, the study presented here forwards the idea that it is possible for individuals, communities and governments to make a positive contribution by engaging in the garden city concept.

Findings

This paper provides a context and study on the complexities surrounding achieving sustainable cities, yet at the same time providing some insight as to what can be achieved if all levels of society are engaged.

Research limitations/implications

This paper emphasises the issues surrounding and importance of sustainable cities and considers a tangible goal for city dwellers at all levels of society.

Practical implications

This paper enables an appreciation of the role urban gardens, right through to the role that appropriate government policy, can play in contributing to, developing and conserving greenspace in cities.

Social implications

This paper fosters a simplified understanding of the potential of citizen contribution providing there is some awareness and the motivation to make a difference.

Originality/value

The study offers a brief personal perspective and connects this with relevant literature to build a case that urban sustainability, although complex, is achievable even though it may take small steps in gaining the necessary momentum.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Malcolm Shaw and D. Howard Green

The Quality Assurance Agency’s (QAA) qualifications framework has resulted in hives of benchmarking activity in 42 subject areas focussed on defining acceptable standards of…

1141

Abstract

The Quality Assurance Agency’s (QAA) qualifications framework has resulted in hives of benchmarking activity in 42 subject areas focussed on defining acceptable standards of performance exclusively for first degree awards. There appears to be little similar activity nationally around postgraduate awards. It has been suggested by QAA that, for the time being, awards at postgraduate levels should be benchmarked directly by reference to the outcomes contained within the qualifications framework for awards at levels M and D. This leaves something of a significant black hole in efforts to assure equity of standards across the postgraduate sector. Begins to address this situation by identifying the sort of thinking that has emerged from undergraduate benchmarking groups and applying it in the context of attempting to benchmark the standards of the PhD. Identifies and discusses issues emerging from this process and from associated national workshop activity. Concludes by indicating the questions to which clear answers should be sought if the PhD, as well as other postgraduate awards, are to be rigorously benchmarked.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Stuart Powell and Howard Green

Raises questions about the research degree examination and in particular the apparent reluctance on the part of institutions and both regulatory and funding agencies to develop a…

1087

Abstract

Raises questions about the research degree examination and in particular the apparent reluctance on the part of institutions and both regulatory and funding agencies to develop a common and transparent approach. Research degree examining is discussed as a quality issue in which the absence of norms adopted for taught programmes is questioned. What results is a confusing and muddled picture of assessment of the highest award of UK universities. The editorial reviews issues arising from candidates’ perceptions of the process of examination, including the viva, prior to the event, the choice of examiners and the approach adopted by the examiners. Examining the criteria employed in the examination and the approach taken, the paper highlights the enormous diversity of practice. The resulting discussion highlights the need for national guidelines and points to the lack of clear direction in the recent joint funding councils’ report.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Malcolm Shaw and Howard Green

This article considers current developments in aspects of continuous professional development (CPD) in the UK, focussing particularly on areas which relate to the development and…

2785

Abstract

This article considers current developments in aspects of continuous professional development (CPD) in the UK, focussing particularly on areas which relate to the development and delivery of an appropriate curriculum. It questions the appropriateness of the traditional concept of continuous professional development in the context of the newly emerging notion of lifelong learning. Some of the major national initiatives and imperatives for change are identified and a range of the typical emerging responses and reactions of Higher Education Institutions are itemised and briefly described. The article was originally prepared for a seminar in Hungary. It will allow the current processes, perspectives and aspirations for continuous professional development in Hungary to be compared against the UK model to assist in the identification and transfer of appropriate practice into the Hungarian context. In so doing it provides a base from which other institutions and professions might consider the development of CPD and lifelong learning.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 June 2021

Samuel Ekung, Isaac Odesola and Alex Opoku

The pertinent information about green buildings (GB) is laden with cost misperceptions (CM) that are paraded into adoption decisions without factual clarifications. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The pertinent information about green buildings (GB) is laden with cost misperceptions (CM) that are paraded into adoption decisions without factual clarifications. The unsupported beliefs are fundamental to the disparaging low adoption of related technologies globally. The purpose of this paper is to explore the causes of CMs among construction stakeholders and why is it difficult to discredit this information?

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopted two-tier approaches involving a Delphi study and a questionnaire survey. Construction stakeholders and GB experts, totalling 415 were surveyed, while 12 professionals participated in the Delphi study. This study analysed data from 254 valid responses using Factor Analysis, Fussy Set Theory and Kruskal Wallis test to explain why CMs are prevalent.

Findings

The causes of CMs converge towards seven principal factors including low knowledge of GB practices, non-familiarity with performance metrics, inadequate evidence, poor-risk perceptions and reliance on the costs of exemplar projects. The results were explained using gaps in cost management, knowledge and sustainability accounting to show the critical improvements that can benefit GB adoption.

Practical implications

CMs are not abstract but develop from patterns that can be detected and understood within a specific context. Growing GB projects within a region would improve cost information, sustainability accounting, cost management and quality of evidence. GB cost information paraded into adoption decision processes are overestimated and overvalued beliefs of their financial implications. Tackling the important sources of CMs in the study is appropriate to improve rational decision-making aiding GB adoption.

Originality/value

This study untied causes of negative dispositions towards the cost of GB that distort stakeholders’ adoption decisions.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 April 2021

Heather J. Forbes, Jenee Vickers Johnson and Jason C. Travers

The innovations in this volume instill a sense of optimism about how special education professionals might improve outcomes for students with disabilities. Although many…

Abstract

The innovations in this volume instill a sense of optimism about how special education professionals might improve outcomes for students with disabilities. Although many interventions illustrate scientific progress toward an evidence-based profession, many special educators may find it challenging to discriminate between scientifically validated innovation and various fads. While innovation reflects the gradual progress of science, fads usually arise suddenly and lack an evidentiary foundation. Some fads may persist over time but without supportive evidence. We present several reasons why we believe special educators adopt fad interventions during an era when scientifically validated special educational practices are readily available. We propose that fads and similar unsubstantiated practices likely will be a persistent problem for special educators. A conservative and judicious approach to adopting “the next big thing” therefore seems important to an evidence-based special education.

Details

The Next Big Thing in Learning and Behavioral Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-749-7

Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2020

Guillermo Casasnovas and Myrto Chliova

Hybrid organizations face particular challenges and opportunities due to combining different logics within one organizational structure. While research on hybrid organizing has…

Abstract

Hybrid organizations face particular challenges and opportunities due to combining different logics within one organizational structure. While research on hybrid organizing has advanced considerably our understanding of how these organizations can cope with such tensions, institutional theory suggests that organizational legitimacy and success will also depend on processes that take place at the field level. We connect these two perspectives to examine how field hybridity influences organizational legitimacy. Specifically, we consider both a field’s maturity and its degree of hybridity as two important variables that determine the effects that field hybridity has on organizational legitimacy. Drawing from extant research and leveraging our empirical work in the fields of microfinance, social entrepreneurship and impact investing to provide illustrative examples, we propose a framework that considers both positive and negative effects of field hybridity on organizational legitimacy. We contribute to the literature on hybrid organizing in two ways. First, we show that hybrid organizations face different challenges and opportunities depending on the stage of development and degree of hybridity of the field they operate in. Second, we suggest that the effects of field hybridity on organizational legitimacy can be understood as trade-offs that organizations need to understand and approach strategically to leverage opportunities and mitigate challenges.

Details

Organizational Hybridity: Perspectives, Processes, Promises
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-355-5

Keywords

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