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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2012

Hilary Piercy, Punita Chowbey, John Soady, Permjeet Dhoot, Lerleen Willis and Sarah Salway

The authors examined the cardiac care pathway with the aim of identifying factors that impact on diagnosis and treatment of coronary heart disease in British Pakistani women.

Abstract

Purpose

The authors examined the cardiac care pathway with the aim of identifying factors that impact on diagnosis and treatment of coronary heart disease in British Pakistani women.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an exploratory qualitative study. In depth interviews and focus groups with an opportunistic sample of Pakistani women and a purposive sample of clinicians working at different points along the care pathway were conducted. The authors used a pathways to care approach to illustrate how their individual and cumulative effect may contribute to differential receipt of treatment, including revascularisation, and health inequalities.

Findings

Four major issues were identified: complex life circumstances; “atypical” presentation and symptomatology; problems related to investigative testing; and poor communication. Mapping these barriers onto the Pathways to Care Model provided valuable insight into their impact on patients' progression through the different stages of the care pathway.

Research limitations/implications

Adopting a care pathway approach demonstrated how individual factors have an impact at several points along the care pathway. It indicated where further, more detailed enquiry is merited and where intervention studies might usefully be directed to improve care.

Practical implications

Examining the whole care pathway identified areas of service improvement that merit a co‐ordinated response.

Originality/value

The framework provided by the Pathways to Care Model offered insight into the causes of the previously observed attenuation in women's progress along the cardiac diagnosis and treatment pathway and is an important first step to addressing this health inequality in a holistic way.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 February 2007

Denise J. Luethge and Philippe Byosiere

This research aims to examine differences in male and female tacit knowledge conversion behaviours in Japan, essentially marrying the studies from knowledge creation and…

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Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to examine differences in male and female tacit knowledge conversion behaviours in Japan, essentially marrying the studies from knowledge creation and gender‐based management in an Asian context.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are collected from a sample of 986 junior, middle and senior level managers in a Japanese firm, of which 14 per cent are women, examining socialisation variables from Nonaka's SECI model.

Findings

The study finds that female managers in Japan believe they attach more importance and perceive that they allocate more time to tacit knowledge socialisation variables than do males for all of the variables in question, although they rank the importance of the variables in much the same way.

Research implications/implications

The study concludes that Kingston may be correct in his description of a “demographic time bomb” in Japanese society, as women begin to undertake similar management behaviours as men.

Practical implications

Women focus on or show a preference for using certain types of information while men may focus on or show a preference for using different types of information. As more women move into middle and upper management in Japan, firms that better meet the needs and focus upon opportunities for women will be able to take advantage of the diversity these individuals bring to an organisation.

Originality/value

Because women are so sparse in Japanese management, few studies have examined their preferences and behaviours. This study gives us a window into the future of how women may act as their numbers increase in Japanese organisations.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

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