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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2017

Harish P. Jagannath

The purpose of this paper is to understand the relationship between administrative entrepreneurship and bureaucratic (administrative) leadership in government bureaucracies.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the relationship between administrative entrepreneurship and bureaucratic (administrative) leadership in government bureaucracies.

Design/methodology/approach

This topic is empirically examined in the context of India’s district administration. A within-case analysis is conducted of a District Collector’s efforts to initiate change using a case study research methodology. Data from elite interviews, analyzed in NVivo 11, are used to draw descriptive inferences that are tested against a set of conditions using the process tracing technique.

Findings

The District Collector in the study aspired to be a transformational leader by demonstrating administrative entrepreneurship, but in reality due to the formal organizational structures, the style of bureaucratic leadership functioning is transactional.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to furthering public leadership theory as it opens up the classic question: what type of leadership is expected out of administrative leaders in government bureaucracies? This is a critical issue given that District Collectors are responsible for the welfare of one-sixth of the world’s population.

Practical implications

District Collectors need to get comfortable with the duality inherent in their position – that their organizational structures allow them to be both administratively entrepreneurial and rigid – and learn the art of navigating these complex structures. Public sector training academies for career civil servants need to engage with the subject of administrative entrepreneurship and leadership.

Originality/value

This is the first study, to the best of knowledge, to develop an analytical typology that can be used as a diagnostic tool for administrative leaders to holistically assess their leadership style.

Article
Publication date: 7 April 2020

Harish P. Jagannath

To examine the implementation processes and outcomes of collaborative governance initiatives through the lens of bureaucratic politics.

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the implementation processes and outcomes of collaborative governance initiatives through the lens of bureaucratic politics.

Design/methodology/approach

An in-depth single case study research design with 28 embedded cases to study the implementation of a collaborative governance initiative. This paper uses the analytical technique of process tracing to explicate necessary and sufficient conditions to uncover causal mechanisms and confirm descriptive and causal inferences.

Findings

This study finds that when street-level bureaucrats perceived the collaborative initiative as a health intervention (and not as a collaborative initiative), it resulted in low levels of stakeholder participation and made the collaborative initiative unsuccessful. This paper finds that bureaucratic politics is the causal mechanism that further legitimized this perception resulting in each stakeholder group avoiding participation and sticking to their departmental siloes.

Research limitations/implications

This is a single case study about a revelatory case of collaborative governance implementation in India, and findings are analytically generalizable to similar administrative contexts. Further research is needed through a multiple case study design in a comparative context to examine bureaucratic politics in implementing collaborative initiatives.

Practical implications

Policymakers and managers need to carefully consider the implications of engaging organizations with competing institutional histories when formulating and implementing collaborative governance initiatives.

Originality/value

This study's uniqueness is that it examines implementation of collaborative governance through a bureaucratic politics lens. Specifically, the study applies Western-centric scholarship on collaborative governance and street-level bureaucracy to a non-Western developing country context to push the theoretical and empirical boundaries of key concepts in public administration.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2017

Frank Ohemeng and Ahmed Shafiqul Huque

1949

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Article
Publication date: 9 January 2024

Kevser Tari Selcuk, Ramazan Mert Atan, Sedat Arslan, Nursel Dal and Kezban Sahin

This study aims to investigate the relationship between dietary polyamine levels, metabolic risk parameters and anthropometric measurements in postmenopausal women.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the relationship between dietary polyamine levels, metabolic risk parameters and anthropometric measurements in postmenopausal women.

Design/methodology/approach

This cross-sectional study was conducted with 562 45–64-year-old postmenopausal women who presented to a Family Health Center. To collect the data, the Descriptive Information Form and Food Frequency Questionnaire were used. In the data analysis, numbers, percentages, mean, standard deviation and multiple linear regression analysis were used.

Findings

The multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that dietary putrescine intake was negatively associated with systolic blood pressure (ß = −0.179, p < 0.001), dietary spermidine intake was positively associated with waist circumference (WC) (ß = 0.142, p = 0.013), systolic blood pressure (ß = 0.188, p = 0.001), diastolic blood pressure (ß = 0.218, p < 0.001), body mass index (BMI) (ß = 0.169, p = 0.003) and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) (ß = 0.156, p = 0.006), and dietary spermine intake was negatively associated with WC (ß = −0.158, p = 0.003), systolic blood pressure (ß = −0.195, p < 0.001), BMI (ß = −0.107, p = 0.042) and WHtR (ß = −0.138, p = 0.009).

Research limitations/implications

Owing to the study’s cross-sectional nature, the lack of succession in the cause–effect relationship, the use of self-report Food Frequency Questionnaire to determine dietary polyamine intake and the inability to analyze seasonal differences are among the limitations of the study.

Originality/value

In this study, an association was determined between dietary polyamines, metabolic risk parameters and anthropometric measurements. The findings suggest that dietary polyamines in human health should be further investigated owing to the increasing metabolic risk parameters.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 54 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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