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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Rossouw von Solms and Melanie Willett

This paper aims to provide guidance on cloud computing assurance from an IT governance point of view. The board and executive management are tasked with ensuring proper…

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1133

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide guidance on cloud computing assurance from an IT governance point of view. The board and executive management are tasked with ensuring proper governance of organizations, which should in the end contribute to a sense of assurance. Assurance is understood to be a part of corporate governance which provides stakeholders with confidence in a subject matter by evaluating evidence about that subject matter. Evidence will include proof that proper controls and structures are in place, that risks are managed and that compliance with internal and external requirements is demonstrated with regard to the subject matter. Decisions regarding the use of cloud computing in organizations bring these responsibilities to the fore.

Design/methodology/approach

The design of this paper is based on an extensive review of literature, predominantly best practices and standards, from the fields covering IT governance, cloud computing and assurance.

Findings

The results from this paper can be used to formulate cloud computing assurance evidence statements, as part of IT governance mandates.

Originality/value

This paper aims to add value by highlighting the responsibility of managers to ensure assurance when exploiting opportunities presented through IT advances, such as cloud computing; serving to inform management about the advances that have and are being made in the field of cloud computing guidelines; and motivating that these guidelines be used for assurance on behalf of organizations adopting and using cloud computing.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Michael Rubach and Armand Picou

The purpose of this paper is to examine the stock price reaction to the first announcement in SEC filings of the enactment of corporate governance guidelines. Agency and

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2718

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the stock price reaction to the first announcement in SEC filings of the enactment of corporate governance guidelines. Agency and management theories suggest the enactment of guidelines should create value for the owners.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses an event study methodology on a sample of 141 firms.

Findings

The research finds only a few firms exhibited a significant reaction. Overall, the data were not significant. Searching for first‐ or late‐mover advantages was also unsuccessful. However, the increased enactment of guidelines (bandwagon effect) supports first order imitation possibly due to the board interlocks found. The results indicate two possible explanations. First, SEC filings may not be a strong signal for the overall market resulting in a potentially unrealized stock value transferred to those few who act on the signal. Second, the value of the guidelines may be unclear to investors. In either case, more public disclosure (i.e. greater transparency) for the adoption of corporate governance guidelines may resolve the issue.

Originality/value

This paper provides valuable information on the value of corporate governance guidelines.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Book part
Publication date: 10 April 2013

Roopinder Oberoi

The study of Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited (BHEL)11BHEL was founded in 1950s. It has emerged as the largest engineering and manufacturing enterprise of its kind in…

Abstract

The study of Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited (BHEL)11BHEL was founded in 1950s. It has emerged as the largest engineering and manufacturing enterprise of its kind in India. Power equipment major BHEL has approached the government for the grant of coveted Maharatna status, which will give the company greater financial autonomy. At present, BHEL is a Navratna company. A company qualifying for the Maharatna status should have an average annual turnover of more than Rs 20,000 crores in the last three years, according to the new guidelines. Once a company gets the Maharatna status, its board would not be required to take the government’s permission for investments up to Rs 5,000 crores in a joint venture project or wholly owned subsidiary. For the Navratna companies, the limit is Rs 1,000 crores. was undertaken to understand the quality of corporate governance in public sector and to gain insight into the major infirmities in internal and external conditions that impinge on the quality of corporate governance in the public enterprises. In India, to bring in more transparency and accountability in the functioning of Central Public Sector Enterprises (CPSEs), the government of India in June 2007 introduced the Guidelines on Corporate Governance. These Guidelines were originally of voluntary nature. The government has acknowledged the need for continuing the adoption of good Corporate Governance Guidelines for ensuring robust public sector with high level of transparency and decided to make these Guidelines mandatory and applicable to all CPSEs. Thereby, government in March 2010 asked all the 246 CPSEs to mandatorily follow corporate governance norms and business ethics, a step to ensure more transparency in their functioning.

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2018

Allan Chang

This paper aims to provide more insights into the standard of corporate governance in New Zealand. The study intends to uncover how a small country with a well-developed…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide more insights into the standard of corporate governance in New Zealand. The study intends to uncover how a small country with a well-developed economy with a good system of law and order, good institutional set up and law enforcements and implements the principles contained in the FMA’s corporate governance guidelines in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is a mixed study one where it employs case study content analysis and augmented by conducting interviews. Large companies are selected to ascertain the level of compliance of NZ companies towards their obligations to report on corporate governance practices within the organisation. At the first stage, the study uses content analysis and looks at contents of company annual reports and publications on websites to determine whether they had disclosed as intended by New Zealand’s corporate governance guidelines.

Findings

The study found that a high compliance was recorded in areas such as board composition and board committees and low compliance recorded in areas involving costly implementation or when the issue is sensitive such as disclosures regarding remuneration details of directors and what non-audit work was undertaken and whether it compromises auditor independence. Being a small country, NZ has performed well in attracting foreign investment due to its strong tradition of law enforcement and respect for regulations. With greater awareness of the importance of corporate governance to investors, companies may see the benefit of greater compliance with the corporate governance guidelines. This is in line with the stakeholder theory and resource dependency theory where companies will voluntarily disclose information on corporate governance, social and environmental performance over and above mandatory requirements to appease and manage their stakeholders.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size of this study represents 3 per cent of total listed companies in New Zealand, but the sample is approximately 10 per cent of local NZ listed companies (i.e. not dual listed in Australia). There are 36 large companies in the New Zealand stock market with market capitalisation of 1 billion and above. In addition, the companies selected for this study are well-known in New Zealand, and it is acknowledged that this can be a source of bias in my analysis.

Practical implications

As was revealed during the interviews with company’s senior officials, Australian companies have achieved a higher level of compliance with the code of corporate governance. In this regard, New Zealand will have to step up and follow Australia’s lead to ensure greater compliance with the New Zealand corporate governance principles and guidelines. It would be in the best interest of the company’s stakeholders if full compliance is achieved.

Originality/value

Studies on the level of compliance by New Zealand companies on their obligations to meet the full extent of disclosures as stipulated by the New Zealand corporate governance guidelines are rare. This study aims to ascertain the standard of corporate governance reporting in New Zealand and the company’s seriousness to comply or attempt to meet the requirements in the seven stipulated principles.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Pallab K. Biswas, Helen Roberts and Rosalind H. Whiting

Based on the socioemotional wealth (SEW) perspective and agency theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine how the introduction of the 2006 Corporate Governance (CG…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the socioemotional wealth (SEW) perspective and agency theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine how the introduction of the 2006 Corporate Governance (CG) Guidelines and family governance affected the level of the corporate social responsibility (CSR) reporting of non-financial companies in Bangladesh.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use multivariate regression to analyse 2,637 firm-level annual observations, from 1996 to 2011 annual reports of Bangladeshi publicly listed non-financial-sector companies, to investigate how firm-level CG quality affects CSR disclosure in family and non-family firms.

Findings

CG quality significantly increases the level of CSR disclosure and this relationship is stronger prior to the new CG Guidelines. Family firms’ CSR reporting levels are significantly lower than non-family firms’, and this effect is stronger after the change in the CG Guidelines. CEO duality, the presence of an audit committee and profitability improve family-firm CSR reporting in Bangladesh, while non-family CSR disclosures are positively associated with board size and firm competition. Board independence is not related to CSR disclosure.

Originality/value

The authors provide evidence of the benefit of the CG Guidelines’ introduction on company CSR disclosure in an emerging economy and the importance of specific governance mechanisms that differentiate family and non-family-firm CSR disclosures in Bangladesh using a SEW framework.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 57 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2020

Etikah Karyani, Setio Anggoro Dewo, Wimboh Santoso and Budi Frensidy

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the disparity between the disclosures of risk governance (RGOV) categories, namely, structures both at the board and management…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the disparity between the disclosures of risk governance (RGOV) categories, namely, structures both at the board and management level, and RGOV practices among five of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN-5) countries. Furthermore, this paper investigates the effects of RGOV and its categories on return on assets (ROA).

Design/methodology/approach

Using 285 ASEAN-5 bank-year observations comprising hand-collected data for the period of 2010–2014, RGOV indexes are developed on the basis of 12 of the 13 governance guidelines published by the Basel Committee.

Findings

Although some banks are found to be early adopters, there is an increasing trend of disclosure for all of the investigated categories. Furthermore, there are no effects of the overall RGOV, board-level RGOV structure and risk management practice on ROA. However, the effect of the management-level RGOV structure on ROA is negative and significant.

Research limitations/implications

Measurements of RGOV indexes are based solely on the examination of criteria that have not been previously tested. Other limitations are related to the information completeness, subjectivity and interpretation.

Practical implications

Management-level RGOV tends to decrease profitability because of the additional costs related to its implementation. Financial regulators may find this result useful as feedback to evaluate the effectiveness of regulation and possible future improvements.

Originality/value

This paper’s uniqueness lies in constructing new RGOV indexes on the basis of the latest bank governance guidelines from the Basel Committee issued on July 9, 2015.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Sulaiman Alnasser

The purpose of this paper is to present a mini review of corporate governance in Malaysia. The paper acts as an introduction to the history of corporate governance in…

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5476

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a mini review of corporate governance in Malaysia. The paper acts as an introduction to the history of corporate governance in Malaysia, from the starting point until the release of the new Blue Print.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a browsing method that takes into consideration the review of the Malaysian Code of Corporate Governance. It also reviews the new blue print of the code of governance in Malaysia.

Findings

An extensive effort is being implemented to improve the corporate governance mechanisms in Malaysia and although Malaysia is following the UK style in designing the corporate governance code, it secured the 4th position among the world's top countries growing in the direction of attracting investors.

Originality/value

This is a review paper based on the guidelines of corporate governance in Malaysia.

Details

The Journal of Risk Finance, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1526-5943

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Alex Proimos

To discuss how to develop best practices and to enforce effective guidelines for corporate governance.

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3528

Abstract

Purpose

To discuss how to develop best practices and to enforce effective guidelines for corporate governance.

Design/methodology/approach

Investigates the ASX Corporate Governance Council's “framework” for improving corporate governance practices. Addresses the importance of effective corporate governance regulations for preventing corporate malfeasance and a loss of confidence by shareholders. Two key corporate governance principles outlined in the ASX's Corporate Governance Guidelines, “make timely and balanced disclosure” and “respect the rights of shareholders,” are examined. Provides a case study of how the CEO of Aristocrat, a poker machine manufacturer and operator, failed to offer timely and balanced disclosure and otherwise demonstrated incompetence and disrespect for shareholders, causing significant financial distress for the corporation and investors.

Findings

For essential corporate governance principles to be effective, they cannot merely serve as “guidelines” to public corporations, but instead must be requirements that are prudently monitored with stringent penalties attached if breached.

Originality/value

Highlights the importance of effective corporate governance regulation in the prevention of future corporate scandals and collapses.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Erick Rading Outa and Nelson M. Waweru

This paper aims to examine the impact of compliance with corporate governance (CG) guidelines during the period 2002-2014 on firm financial performance and firm value of…

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2493

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the impact of compliance with corporate governance (CG) guidelines during the period 2002-2014 on firm financial performance and firm value of Kenyan-listed companies.

Design/methodology/approach

Using panel data of 520-firm year’s observations between 2005 and 2014, the authors test the hypothesis that compliance with CG guidelines issued in 2002 by Capital Markets Authority (CMA) improved firm financial performance and firm value.

Findings

Compliance with CG Index which is an aggregate of all the CG guidelines is positively and significantly related to firm performance and firm value. Board evaluation is also positively and significantly related to firm performance. The findings suggest that CG guidelines are associated with firm financial performance and firm value.

Originality/value

The authors provide evidence on the relationship between CG practices and firm financial performance and firm value in Kenya. Second, the authors provide evidence on board evaluation which has not been tested before in a “comply or explain” environment. Finally, they evaluate how CMA 2002 CG guidelines steered firm financial performance and firm value over its life cycle from 2002 to 2014. These results are important to CMA and other CG regulators and boards in their efforts to improve CG practices in the region.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 31 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Book part
Publication date: 25 August 2014

Aishath Muneeza

This chapter aims to explore the Shari’ah governance rules applied in the Malaysian Islamic banking arena and the effect of Islamic Financial Services Act 2013 on it.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter aims to explore the Shari’ah governance rules applied in the Malaysian Islamic banking arena and the effect of Islamic Financial Services Act 2013 on it.

Design/Methodology/Approach

This is a legal exploratory study primarily focused on library research.

Findings

Shari’ah governance is a concept that has been developed and applied gradually in Malaysia and the new Islamic Financial Services Act 2013 has taken it to the next level. However, this does not mean that it has resolved the problems in Shari’ah governance that existed before the enactment of the act.

Originality/Value

Islamic Financial Services Act 2013 is a new statute that repealed Islamic Banking Act 1983. As such, not many have reviewed this new piece of legislation. This chapter will give insight into the evolution of Shari’ah governance as part of corporate governance of Islamic banks in Malaysia and will help explain the most recent developments in this arena along with the challenges.

Details

The Developing Role of Islamic Banking and Finance: From Local to Global Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-817-4

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