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1 – 10 of 43
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Arthur Harkins, John Tomsyck and George Kubik

This paper projects a positive future for America and the globe within an emerging “innovation economy”. The innovation economy is supported by knowledge workers and by emerging…

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Abstract

This paper projects a positive future for America and the globe within an emerging “innovation economy”. The innovation economy is supported by knowledge workers and by emerging innovation workers. The authors offer examples in support of an innovation economy, stressing the development and application of strategic capital in selected areas: education; culture; the individual; society; and technology. The authors suggest that education services take the lead through a new “prospective” service mission. Prospective education would undertake continuous strategic projections and mine the most promising of these. Both services would help support the innovation economy and its innovative individuals and organizations.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

George H. Kubik

To review the edited anthology Anticipatory Behavior in Adaptive Learning Systems: Foundations, Theories, and Systems.

704

Abstract

Purpose

To review the edited anthology Anticipatory Behavior in Adaptive Learning Systems: Foundations, Theories, and Systems.

Design/methodology/approach

Comments on the book's 16 articles that rapidly transition from introductory philosophy to specific research reports.

Findings

The consensus is that anticipatory behaviors are critical to performance in a variety of natural and built systems – especially adaptive learning systems. This outcome, with some disagreement among the authors, is demonstrated through a variety of exemplars.

Originality/value

The reviewer feels that this book is of seminal importance. The exploration of anticipatory behaviors as a legitimate and promising area of informed discourse and scientific research is novel and definitely a major contribution toward understanding and enhancing the performance of complex systems.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2001

Arthur Harkins and George Kubik

Presents scenarios which illustrate the functionality of digitally distributed competence (DC). Explains that Performance Base Learning (PBL) is premised on the use of DC to…

Abstract

Presents scenarios which illustrate the functionality of digitally distributed competence (DC). Explains that Performance Base Learning (PBL) is premised on the use of DC to support increments in human learning and makes a case for DC‐supported PBL in education. Explores the challenges faced by the workforce that have resulted in expanded uses of DC and argues that these challenges provide clear guidelines for the renovation and revitalization of education services in countries such as the United States. Concludes that in the PBL paradigm, learning is a Just‐In‐Time event that occurs in the moment of performance or in highly detailed Just‐Ahead‐of‐Time simulations that are continually revised by smart DC software.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Arthur Harkins and George Kubik

This is the sixth article in our series projecting a shift from learning to perform to performing to learn. This article summarizes and comments upon the last of three…

Abstract

This is the sixth article in our series projecting a shift from learning to perform to performing to learn. This article summarizes and comments upon the last of three story‐writing exercises undertaken by 166 Minnesota public school administrators in late January 2001.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

Arthur Harkins and George Kubik

This article is the fourth in a series examining the projected impacts of new technology and software on K‐12 education. The data was collected from 166 school administrators…

Abstract

This article is the fourth in a series examining the projected impacts of new technology and software on K‐12 education. The data was collected from 166 school administrators attending a workshop in the United States during January 2001. The data is presented in the form of brief composites representing administrator uses of handhelds for school management performances. The authors then comment on the administrators’ assessments based on the background reasoning.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Arthur Harkins and George Kubik

This is the third of seven reports on the development of software to support performances in which learning takes place. We will introduce a school administrator study population…

Abstract

This is the third of seven reports on the development of software to support performances in which learning takes place. We will introduce a school administrator study population in this article and follow up with three highly descriptive reports of their assessments of software‐supported learning performances.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

Arthur M. Harkins and George H. Kubik

Introduces the notion of Distributed Competence and Performance Base Learning. Notes that cannot always learn for the future and asserts that DC ensures that people learn for the…

Abstract

Introduces the notion of Distributed Competence and Performance Base Learning. Notes that cannot always learn for the future and asserts that DC ensures that people learn for the present. Provides examples of Distributed Competence Intervention and Performance Base Learning in practice.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

George H. Kubik

The purpose of this article is to define a framework for projecting future leading-edge alpha societies based on the principle of requisite variety. Alpha societies are advanced…

251

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to define a framework for projecting future leading-edge alpha societies based on the principle of requisite variety. Alpha societies are advanced as a platform for creating future forms of work and workforce preparation premised on continuous creativity, invention, design and innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The principle of requisite variety is presented as the basis for a structured schema that incorporates trends and developments in anticipatory behaviors, systems thinking, creativity, design and innovation to produce a strategy for continuous leading-edge learning and performance.

Findings

Growing global hypercompetition requires real-time ability to create and deliver world-class ideas and value-adding products and services in the shortest possible timeframes. This challenge requires societies, enterprises and individuals that are capable of continuously expanding and expressing their internal variety and complexity while rapidly decreasing the gaps between learning and doing.

Research limitations/implications

The principle of requisite variety has been well known to cybernetics and systems communities since 1956. However, literature linking the principle of requisite variety to the future of learning and work is not well developed.

Practical implications

This article establishes requisite variety generation as a valuable resource for twenty-first century societies and economies engaged in producing leading-edge outcomes.

Social implications

The requisite variety framework developed in this article is intended to enhance the ability of leading-edge societies to continuously leapfrog existing educational, social and economic trajectories.

Originality/value

The author defines the future of education and work in terms of enhancing individual, enterprise and societal abilities to absorb, generate and exploit variety, complexity and ambiguity.

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2010

Arthur M. Harkins and George H. Kubik

The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the importance of modern and forward‐looking educational practices that encourage learner development of open sourcing and collaboration

1752

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the importance of modern and forward‐looking educational practices that encourage learner development of open sourcing and collaboration as being desirable competencies for twenty‐first century knowledge and innovation workers. Its intent is to employ the topic of “ethical cheating” as the springboard for opening a constructive dialogue between historic traditions of academic ethics and the emergence of digital‐age learners who are already functioning as digital pioneers, innovators, and content contributors in an increasingly connected, rapidly‐paced world.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines the subject of academic cheating in the context of emerging high‐technology environments. It defines the term “ethical” cheating from the perspective of digital‐age learning and contrasts it with traditional academic views of cheating in classical educational situations.

Findings

Rapid developments in digital information technologies such as cell‐phones, pdas, and the internet are profoundly changing student attitudes toward what constitutes cheating in academic settings. The presence of widespread high‐tech devices already enables increasing numbers of learners around the globe to participate in extensive and ongoing collaborative and open‐source activities that reflect competitive business practices but run counter to the accepted norms of traditional educational institutions. The introduction of the term “ethical cheating” here reflects the growing dissonance between traditional academic views of ethical standards and the impatience of learners straining to become twenty‐first century workers and societal members. A new dialogue is needed to reconcile these differences.

Originality/value

The paper introduces the term “ethical cheating” as a springboard to initiate a new dialogue between traditional academic norms and the emergence of new student attitudes regarding the use of digital technologies that facilitate learning through open‐sourcing and collaboration.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Arthur M. Harkins and George H. Kubik

This paper aims to focus on the production and application of seven knowledge production Modes in support of continuous innovation societies (CIS).

408

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on the production and application of seven knowledge production Modes in support of continuous innovation societies (CIS).

Design/methodology/approach

Seven tertiary educational archetypes are constructed as engines for creating and supporting CIS, with attention to the modal types of knowledge that each produces together with markets for this knowledge.

Findings

The most important “on the horizon” type of knowledge identified for the future of tertiary education is Mode III, or knowledge produced by and for the individual. The division of knowledge production is projected within tertiary education through leadership or lagging indicator choices, and the associated roles of faculty, students, and stakeholders.

Originality/value

Special emphasis is placed on the future of leapfrog campus, or the campus capable of, or aspiring to, new leadership status in support of CIS.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

1 – 10 of 43