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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

George H. Kubik

To review the edited anthology Anticipatory Behavior in Adaptive Learning Systems: Foundations, Theories, and Systems.

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Abstract

Purpose

To review the edited anthology Anticipatory Behavior in Adaptive Learning Systems: Foundations, Theories, and Systems.

Design/methodology/approach

Comments on the book's 16 articles that rapidly transition from introductory philosophy to specific research reports.

Findings

The consensus is that anticipatory behaviors are critical to performance in a variety of natural and built systems – especially adaptive learning systems. This outcome, with some disagreement among the authors, is demonstrated through a variety of exemplars.

Originality/value

The reviewer feels that this book is of seminal importance. The exploration of anticipatory behaviors as a legitimate and promising area of informed discourse and scientific research is novel and definitely a major contribution toward understanding and enhancing the performance of complex systems.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

Arthur M. Harkins and George H. Kubik

Introduces the notion of Distributed Competence and Performance Base Learning. Notes that cannot always learn for the future and asserts that DC ensures that people learn for the…

Abstract

Introduces the notion of Distributed Competence and Performance Base Learning. Notes that cannot always learn for the future and asserts that DC ensures that people learn for the present. Provides examples of Distributed Competence Intervention and Performance Base Learning in practice.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

George H. Kubik

The purpose of this article is to define a framework for projecting future leading-edge alpha societies based on the principle of requisite variety. Alpha societies are advanced…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to define a framework for projecting future leading-edge alpha societies based on the principle of requisite variety. Alpha societies are advanced as a platform for creating future forms of work and workforce preparation premised on continuous creativity, invention, design and innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The principle of requisite variety is presented as the basis for a structured schema that incorporates trends and developments in anticipatory behaviors, systems thinking, creativity, design and innovation to produce a strategy for continuous leading-edge learning and performance.

Findings

Growing global hypercompetition requires real-time ability to create and deliver world-class ideas and value-adding products and services in the shortest possible timeframes. This challenge requires societies, enterprises and individuals that are capable of continuously expanding and expressing their internal variety and complexity while rapidly decreasing the gaps between learning and doing.

Research limitations/implications

The principle of requisite variety has been well known to cybernetics and systems communities since 1956. However, literature linking the principle of requisite variety to the future of learning and work is not well developed.

Practical implications

This article establishes requisite variety generation as a valuable resource for twenty-first century societies and economies engaged in producing leading-edge outcomes.

Social implications

The requisite variety framework developed in this article is intended to enhance the ability of leading-edge societies to continuously leapfrog existing educational, social and economic trajectories.

Originality/value

The author defines the future of education and work in terms of enhancing individual, enterprise and societal abilities to absorb, generate and exploit variety, complexity and ambiguity.

Article
Publication date: 10 May 2013

George H. Kubik

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the emerging new economy is impacting the future of human capital development and the future of work.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the emerging new economy is impacting the future of human capital development and the future of work.

Design/methodology/approach

A detailed review of the literature is used to profile the changing nature of work and work requirements in the emerging new economy. Recent trends and developments in human capital development and advancements in computer‐enhanced performanceware are combined with components of the traditional apprenticeship model. The resulting silicon‐based apprenticeship model is compared and contrasted with models of formal education, training, and apprenticeship.

Findings

The fast‐paced new economy is demanding greater performance from ever‐greater percentages of the world's population. New forms of hypercompetition demand the elimination of the long lead‐times that have traditionally existed between learning and doing. The proffered silicon‐based apprenticeship model is advanced as a development that is projected to jump‐start twenty‐first century learner/performers into on‐demand, world‐class, performance.

Research limitations/implications

Speculative literature directed at the future of new economy work and workers is not cohesively linked to the literature of electronic performance enhancement, learning theory, and advancements in technology. This paper advances an approach for accelerating work performance and human capital development that may instigate future research in this area.

Practical implications

This paper identifies the value of greatly accelerating the performance of workers in the emerging new economy, while simultaneously decreasing the existing time lag between learning and performance.

Social implications

The ability to involve more individuals in the emerging new economy promises to increase both quality of life and standard of living for greater percentages of the global population.

Originality/value

The author asserts that silicon‐based apprenticeships are a necessary next step toward engaging more of the world's population in the new economy.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Arthur M. Harkins and George H. Kubik

This paper aims to focus on the production and application of seven knowledge production Modes in support of continuous innovation societies (CIS).

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on the production and application of seven knowledge production Modes in support of continuous innovation societies (CIS).

Design/methodology/approach

Seven tertiary educational archetypes are constructed as engines for creating and supporting CIS, with attention to the modal types of knowledge that each produces together with markets for this knowledge.

Findings

The most important “on the horizon” type of knowledge identified for the future of tertiary education is Mode III, or knowledge produced by and for the individual. The division of knowledge production is projected within tertiary education through leadership or lagging indicator choices, and the associated roles of faculty, students, and stakeholders.

Originality/value

Special emphasis is placed on the future of leapfrog campus, or the campus capable of, or aspiring to, new leadership status in support of CIS.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2010

Arthur M. Harkins and George H. Kubik

The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the importance of modern and forward‐looking educational practices that encourage learner development of open sourcing and collaboration

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the importance of modern and forward‐looking educational practices that encourage learner development of open sourcing and collaboration as being desirable competencies for twenty‐first century knowledge and innovation workers. Its intent is to employ the topic of “ethical cheating” as the springboard for opening a constructive dialogue between historic traditions of academic ethics and the emergence of digital‐age learners who are already functioning as digital pioneers, innovators, and content contributors in an increasingly connected, rapidly‐paced world.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines the subject of academic cheating in the context of emerging high‐technology environments. It defines the term “ethical” cheating from the perspective of digital‐age learning and contrasts it with traditional academic views of cheating in classical educational situations.

Findings

Rapid developments in digital information technologies such as cell‐phones, pdas, and the internet are profoundly changing student attitudes toward what constitutes cheating in academic settings. The presence of widespread high‐tech devices already enables increasing numbers of learners around the globe to participate in extensive and ongoing collaborative and open‐source activities that reflect competitive business practices but run counter to the accepted norms of traditional educational institutions. The introduction of the term “ethical cheating” here reflects the growing dissonance between traditional academic views of ethical standards and the impatience of learners straining to become twenty‐first century workers and societal members. A new dialogue is needed to reconcile these differences.

Originality/value

The paper introduces the term “ethical cheating” as a springboard to initiate a new dialogue between traditional academic norms and the emergence of new student attitudes regarding the use of digital technologies that facilitate learning through open‐sourcing and collaboration.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

Patti H. Clayton

Discusses the concept of service‐learning in relation to environmental education. Observes the similarities between the two concepts. Defines the service‐learning experience…

Abstract

Discusses the concept of service‐learning in relation to environmental education. Observes the similarities between the two concepts. Defines the service‐learning experience, provides brief guidelines for implementing a learning experience, gives examples of service learning and presents implications for action.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 27 January 2012

349

Abstract

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

Dan Blatt

Discusses the growth and development of US higher education institutions. Comments on how technology has enabled this growth but also stresses that there will always be a need for…

Abstract

Discusses the growth and development of US higher education institutions. Comments on how technology has enabled this growth but also stresses that there will always be a need for face‐to‐face teaching. Briefly looks at the software bottleneck.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 26 September 2023

Davide Giusino, Marco De Angelis, Rudolf Kubík, Carolyn Axtell and Luca Pietrantoni

The purpose of this study is to describe the implementation of a digital-based team coaching intervention aimed at improving team communication in the workplace through social…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to describe the implementation of a digital-based team coaching intervention aimed at improving team communication in the workplace through social network visualization. The study examined recipients’ perceptions of the intervention at two time points and assessed the temporal stability of various factors, including the intervention’s integrity, design, transferability, acceptance and the usability of the adopted visualization tool. The moderating role of digital usability was also evaluated.

Design/methodology/approach

Four team coaching sessions were delivered to 62 participants from seven teams across three departments within a large public health-care organization in Northern Italy. Perceptions of the intervention dimensions were collected after the second and fourth sessions.

Findings

Results indicated that, at both time points, recipients appreciated the intervention’s integrity and usability more than its design, transferability and acceptance. Furthermore, no significant changes in recipients’ perceptions were observed over time. The transferability of the intervention was significantly associated with its acceptance, but only when the usability of the digital tool was high.

Research limitations/implications

The study enriches existing literature on digital interventions in group communication by focusing on process dimensions like recipients’ perceptions of various aspects and the implementation process. Furthermore, the study underscores the potential of integrating specific techniques such as sociomapping and coaching within health-care organizations, encouraging more research and development in these areas.

Practical implications

The study emphasizes the critical role of usability and integrity in digital-based team coaching interventions, suggesting that high-quality, user-friendly tools not only lead to initial effectiveness but also sustain positive impacts over time, while also increasing transferability and acceptance.

Originality/value

The present study uniquely deploys a longitudinal approach to examine recipients’ perceptions of a digital-based intervention that combines social network visualization and team coaching to enhance team communication.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

1 – 10 of 34