Search results

1 – 10 of 17
Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Jonathan A.J. Wilson, Russell W. Belk, Gary J. Bamossy, Özlem Sandikci, Hermawan Kartajaya, Rana Sobh, Jonathan Liu and Linda Scott

The purpose of this paper is to bring together the thoughts and opinions of key members of the Journal of Islamic Marketing's (JIMA) Editorial Team, regarding the recently branded…

2174

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to bring together the thoughts and opinions of key members of the Journal of Islamic Marketing's (JIMA) Editorial Team, regarding the recently branded phenomenon of Islamic marketing – in the interests of stimulating further erudition.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopted an “eagle eye” method to investigate this phenomenon: Where attempts were made to frame general principles and observations; alongside a swooping view of key anecdotal observations – in order to ground and enrich the study. The authors participated in an iterative process when analysing longitudinal and contemporary phenomenological data, in order to arrive at a consensus. This was grounded in: triangulating individual and collective researcher findings; critiquing relevant published material; and reflecting upon known reviewed manuscripts submitted to marketing publications – both successful and unsuccessful.

Findings

The authors assert that a key milestone in the study and practice of marketing, branding, consumer behaviour and consumption in connection with Islam and Muslims is the emergence of research wherein the terms “Islamic marketing” and “Islamic branding” have evolved – of which JIMA is also a by‐product. Some have construed Islam marketing/branding as merely a niche area. Given the size of Muslim populations globally and the critical importance of understanding Islam in the context of business and practices with local, regional and international ramifications, scholarship on Islamic marketing has become essential. Western commerce and scholarship has been conducted to a limited extent, and some evidence exists that research is occurring globally. The authors believe it is vital for “Islamic marketing” scholarship to move beyond simply raising the flag of “Brand Islam” and the consideration of Muslim geographies to a point where Islam – as a way of life, a system of beliefs and practices, and religious and social imperatives – is amply explored.

Research limitations/implications

An “eagle eye” view has been taken, which balances big picture and grassroots conceptual findings. The topic is complex – and so while diverse expert opinions are cited, coverage of many issues is necessarily brief, due to space constraints.

Practical implications

Scholars and practitioners alike should find the thoughts contained in the paper of significant interest. Ultimately, scholarship of Islam's influences on marketing theory and practice should lead to results which have pragmatic implications, just as research on Islamic banking and finance has.

Originality/value

The paper appears to be the first to bring together such a diverse set of expert opinions within one body of work, and one that provides a forum for experts to reflect and comment on peers' views, through iteration. Also the term Crescent marketing is introduced to highlight how critical cultural factors are, which shape perceptions and Islamic practises.

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Ed Chung and Eileen Fischer

Considers the pluralistic cultures which exist within a nation and outlines the history of previous research into this field. Introduces the concept of embeddedness which means…

Abstract

Considers the pluralistic cultures which exist within a nation and outlines the history of previous research into this field. Introduces the concept of embeddedness which means that the society within which a person lives will influence their behaviour. Discusses intracultural differences and presents some research strategies for looking at the ethnic consumer.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 19 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Lena Croft and Shige Makino

Conventional theories of market entry assume choice availability. This investment assumption is subject to challenges in the power generation market of an emerging economy where…

Abstract

Conventional theories of market entry assume choice availability. This investment assumption is subject to challenges in the power generation market of an emerging economy where the host government controls most key resources and market entry choices. With such constraints, entrants become heavily dependent on their host country partners. This study investigates how the resource dependency frameworks explain better in respect of some US power generation firms that manage to operate electricity facilities in China whereas some have to abort. Using cross‐case analysis, patterns emerged illustrate how two groups of entrants manage key resources differently.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

Content available
449

Abstract

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Ed Chung and Kim Whalen

This article is premised on the idea that social networks represent an important, but often overlooked, unit of analysis in management and entrepreneurship studies. The concept of…

1086

Abstract

This article is premised on the idea that social networks represent an important, but often overlooked, unit of analysis in management and entrepreneurship studies. The concept of embeddedness, emphasizing the significance of social relationships, is of particular relevance as more and more frequently minorities and immigrants engage in small businessownership. This article borrows from the ethnicity and social network traditions, and offers that an analysis of the ethnic homogeneity of an entrepreneur's strong and weak social ties would be fruitful in gauging entrepreneurial success.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

Article
Publication date: 26 April 2019

Tamás Gyulavári and Erzsébet Malota

This study aims to determine cultures as personalities and investigates whether similarities or dissimilarities compared to the respondent’s own personality (actual self) are more…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to determine cultures as personalities and investigates whether similarities or dissimilarities compared to the respondent’s own personality (actual self) are more attractive. The objectives are to identify the culture personality dimensions relevant for destination choice and to investigate the effect of congruity between perceived actual self and perceived culture personality on the evaluation of the examined cultures as ideal destinations. In this manner, numerous participants in the tourism industry may gain more specific insights into certain segments, while communication related to the specific culture can be targeted more efficiently.

Design/methodology/approach

A culture personality scale was developed by identifying the five relevant dimensions (three items in each). To measure actual self, the same 15 scale items were used. In the framework of the current research, 238 respondents evaluated the Turkish and French culture personality and their own personality.

Findings

Results show that for both cultures highly similar personality structures can be observed; incorporating dimensions such as competence, interpersonal approach, aura, life approach and rectitude. In relation to congruity theory, the authors found that the effect of the similarity between perceived culture personality and actual self is marginal. Instead, results show that the more positively culture personality is perceived relative to perceived actual self, the more positive the attitude respondents have towards cultures as destinations.

Research limitations/implications

The generalizability of the results is subject to some limitations due to the student sample.

Originality/value

Both the developed scale and the revealed effects contribute to the research field.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 74 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Albert M. Muñiz Jr, Toby Norris and Gary Alan Fine

In recent years, scholars have begun suggesting that marketing can learn a lot from art and art history. This paper aims to build on that work by developing the proposition that…

4903

Abstract

Purpose

In recent years, scholars have begun suggesting that marketing can learn a lot from art and art history. This paper aims to build on that work by developing the proposition that successful artists are powerful brands.

Design/methodology/approach

Using archival data and biographies, this paper explores the branding acumen of Pablo Picasso.

Findings

Picasso maneuvered with consummate skill to assure his position in the art world. By mid-career, he had established his brand so successfully that he had the upper hand over the dealers who represented him, and his work was so sought-after that he could count on selling whatever proportion of it he chose to allow to leave his studio. In order to achieve this level of success, Picasso had to read the culture in which he operated and manage the efforts of a complex system of different intermediaries and stakeholders that was not unlike an organization. Based on an analysis of Picasso's career, the authors assert that in their management of these powerful brands, artists generate a complex, multifaceted public identity that is distinct from a product brand but shares important characteristics with corporate brands, luxury brands and cultural/iconic brands.

Originality/value

This research extends prior work by demonstrating that having an implicit understanding of the precepts of branding is not limited to contemporary artists and by connecting the artist to emerging conceptualizations of brands, particularly the nascent literatures on cultural, complex and corporate brands.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 48 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Katerina Karanika and Margaret K. Hogg

This paper aims to examine how ambivalence and intergenerational support intersect with consumption in experiences of sharing within the family.

1041

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how ambivalence and intergenerational support intersect with consumption in experiences of sharing within the family.

Design/methodology/approach

Consumer research studies usually use one of two family paradigms (i.e. solidarity and conflict), but the role of ambivalence in family ties is often neglected. This paper examines how ambivalence relates to adult intergenerational support, specifically within the context of sharing, consumption and family identity. In contrast to consumer research studies, sociological studies identify the intersection between intergenerational ambivalence and intergenerational support within family life. This study draws on sociology literature to interpret data from phenomenological interviews with downwardly mobile Greek consumers involved in familial intergenerational support and sharing. The voices of adult recipients and providers of resources are captured, and the transcribed interview texts are analysed using a phenomenological-hermeneutical process.

Findings

Three types of consumer ambivalence were identified that reflected different types of conflicts between consumption choices and different levels of family identity (collective, relational and individual).

Research limitations/implications

Future research should explore ambivalence and family sharing in different family structures and during different transitions. Future research should also investigate how this study’s findings resonate in societies less affected by austerity measures with stronger welfare states that nevertheless experience a rise in intergenerational support.

Originality/value

The study problematises previously somewhat polarised (i.e. positive vs bleak) views of the family in consumer research. Family sharing is highlighted as a major antecedent to consumer ambivalence, and different types of consumer ambivalence within intergenerational relationships within families are conceptualised. This paper proposes an extended typology of coping strategies aligned along a practical–emotional continuum.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

Richard Ettenson

The economic reforms sweeping Eastern Europe and the former SovietUnion point to a critical need for consumer‐based market research in theregion. In this study, conjoint analysis…

1861

Abstract

The economic reforms sweeping Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union point to a critical need for consumer‐based market research in the region. In this study, conjoint analysis was used to analyse Russian ( n=88), Polish (n=77), and Hungarian (n=113) consumers′ decision behaviour in a single product category, colour televisions. Of particular interest were the separate and joint roles played by brand name and country of origin in the decision processes of former Socialist consumers. The results show that Russian and Polish consumers place considerable emphasis on the product′s place of manufacture, while the Hungarians were more “functional” in their decision strategy, focusing on the product′s intrinsic properties. Contrary to expectations, brand name was less important than other attributes in the decision making of all three groups. Each group also showed minimal concern with the interaction between brand name and country of origin. Discusses implications for Western firms which are seeking market and investment opportunities in the former Eastern Bloc.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Gary A. Knight and Roger J. Calantone

There is much research suggesting that the image consumers hold about a product’s country of origin can influence their purchase decision, but little empirical work has focused on…

7765

Abstract

There is much research suggesting that the image consumers hold about a product’s country of origin can influence their purchase decision, but little empirical work has focused on the underlying cognitive processing. A flexible model is devised and tested to represent country image processing, using data from large samples of US and Japanese consumers. In addition to strongly supporting the validity of the model, results suggest that country image cognitive processing is significantly more complex than previously thought, and that culture appears to play an important role in purchase decisions. The flexible model represents a substantive improvement in the depiction of cognitive processing regarding country‐of‐origin image.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

1 – 10 of 17