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Article

Norshila Shaifuddin, Siti Rasyidah Md Rushdi and Mad Khir Johari Abdullah Sani

The purpose of this paper is to investigate various strategies of Malaysian public academic libraries that have been implemented to support library financial resources and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate various strategies of Malaysian public academic libraries that have been implemented to support library financial resources and to describe the challenges faced by the public university libraries in implementing income generation activities.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative data collection approach using a structured interview has been employed to elicit the opinions of librarians working in public university libraries in Klang Valley, Malaysia. In total, five (5) interview transcripts have been analyzed using theme-based analysis.

Findings

This study shows that the Malaysian public academic libraries showed positive reactions toward income generation. Various activities of revenue generation are carried out to support library financial resources on a small scale. However, management support for this concept is poor resulted due to many problems in carrying out the activities.

Practical implications

This study provides insights into the importance of revenue generation activities as a source of library financial resources at public academic libraries. The strategies include the investment of academic libraries in implementing the activities related to the income generation. It is required for the library to add this activity in its library budget, the proper strategic planning and the introduction of various revenue generation activities.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the field of library and information management as it highlights the strategies of outside revenue generation activities in Malaysian public academic libraries. Library administrators could use the results to develop their strategic plans to ensure the success of the initiatives.

Details

Library Management, vol. 42 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Abstract

Subject area

Fundraising, Marketing Strategy.

Study level/applicability

Undergraduate and Postgraduate.

Case overview

Professional fundraising plays a key role in the operation and sustainability of various forms of organizations, particularly non-governmental organizations (NGOs). “Fundraising for Life” is the success story of a center that is totally dependent on fundraising to achieve its mission of lifesaving and treatment for children with chronic diseases regardless of their financial situation. This case sheds the light on the primary sources of contributions, the importance of an integrated development program, the mutual benefits of partnering with other entities and the challenges encountered in the fundraising endeavors in this developing and unstable part of the world.

Expected learning outcomes

The students will be able to explore the current practices used in fundraising as well as the marketing and communication strategies employed in nurturing and maintaining relations with potential donors and partners. They will also be able to explore the internal and external challenges and opportunities available for fundraisers.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 5 no. 6
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Book part

Whitney Pape and Eric C. Shoaf

Preservation activities have existed in libraries since the early days of librarianship, but these efforts were mostly decentralized and buried in the work of many…

Abstract

Preservation activities have existed in libraries since the early days of librarianship, but these efforts were mostly decentralized and buried in the work of many different departments. Not until the 1970s did library organizations begin to add preservation to organizational charts on a departmental or middle management level, along with its new administrative costs. At that time, libraries were struggling with early efforts at automation and the many changes it would bring to their organizations. Preservation department functions, formerly decentralized from an administrative and budgetary standpoint under the headings of commercial binding, book repair, special collections, or circulation, were now identified as a budget line forced to compete for funds with newly formed library systems departments as well as other traditional library functions. This was particularly difficult given that a large portion of the costs of a comprehensive preservation department were new and additive (Fasana and Baker, 1992, p. 132), yet provided few immediately evident benefits. A burgeoning library systems unit could place libraries on the cutting edge of technology; automated card catalogs could improve productivity and efficiency for staff, and also provide for better patron access to collections. Needless to say, systems departments were much better funded than preservation units at this time.

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12-024627-4

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Article

Muhamed Zulkhibri

– The purpose of this paper is to provide a comparative analysis on the regulation, the applicable law and the tax treatment in the operations of NPOs in developing countries.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a comparative analysis on the regulation, the applicable law and the tax treatment in the operations of NPOs in developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

A comparative analysis in term of NPOs legal framework governing the formation, existence, restriction and fundraising of NPOs, as well as the tax treatment for the NPOs.

Findings

The findings suggest that regulations of NPOs in these countries exhibit a mixed picture with respect to the establishment, operation, affiliation and fundraising, as well as their tax incentives and preferences. In some countries, NPOs have fewer restrictions and are eligible for generous tax incentives, while for other countries, various restrictions and lack of incentives are the norms. The legal frameworks for NPOs are burdensome and, to some extent, do not reflect the importance of NPOs as partner for development of society. The findings also suggest that tax treatments in these countries vary from simple to complex coupled with obscure tax exemptions rules.

Originality/value

Around the globe, authorities and society are increasingly acknowledging the important role of NPOs in dealing with social needs from basic poverty, health and sustainable environments. This study’s focus on NPOs regulation will provide an understanding for authorities to design an appropriate framework for the growth and vibrancy of the NPOs.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 56 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

Keywords

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Article

Patrick J. O’Halloran, Christian Leuprecht, Ali Ghanbar Pour Dizboni, Alexandra Green and David Adelstein

This paper aims to examine whether the money laundering/terrorist financing (ML/TF) model excludes important aspects of terrorist resourcing and whether the terrorist…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine whether the money laundering/terrorist financing (ML/TF) model excludes important aspects of terrorist resourcing and whether the terrorist resourcing model (TRM) provides a more comprehensive framework for analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

Research consisted of case studies of resourcing activities of four listed terrorist organizations between 2001 and 2015: the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE), Hamas, a grouping of Al Qaeda-inspired individuals and entities under the heading “Al Qaeda inspired” and Hezbollah.

Findings

The most prevalent resourcing actors observed were non-profit organizations/associations, and the most prevalent form of resourcing was fundraising that targeted individual cash donations of small amounts. Funds were pooled, often passed through layers of charitable organizations and transmitted through chartered banks. The TRM is indeed found to provide a more comprehensive framework for identifying sources of resourcing and points of intervention. However, it does not in itself recommend effective means of response but it has implications for counter-resourcing strategies because it identifies resourcing actors and nodes where counter-resourcing could occur.

Originality/value

This paper advances the state of knowledge of terrorist resourcing activities in Canada and about the value of doing so through the analytical lens of the TRM as opposed to the predominant ML/TF model.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

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Article

Jing Lu, Lisa Cairns and Lucy Smith

A vast amount of complex data is being generated in the business environment, which enables support for decision-making through information processing and insight…

Abstract

Purpose

A vast amount of complex data is being generated in the business environment, which enables support for decision-making through information processing and insight generation. The purpose of this study is to propose a process model for data-driven decision-making which provides an overarching methodology covering key stages of the business analytics life cycle. The model is then applied in two small enterprises using real customer/donor data to assist the strategic management of sales and fundraising.

Design/methodology/approach

Data science is a multi-disciplinary subject that aims to discover knowledge and insight from data while providing a bridge to data-driven decision-making across businesses. This paper starts with a review of established frameworks for data science and analytics before linking with process modelling and data-driven decision-making. A consolidated methodology is then described covering the key stages of exploring data, discovering insights and making decisions.

Findings

Representative case studies from a small manufacturing organisation and an independent hospice charity have been used to illustrate the application of the process model. Visual analytics have informed customer sales strategy and donor fundraising strategy through recommendations to the respective senior management teams.

Research limitations/implications

The scope of this research has focused on customer analytics in small to medium-sized enterprise through two case studies. While the aims of these organisations are rather specific, they share a commonality of purpose for their strategic development, which is addressed by this paper.

Originality/value

Data science is shown to be applicable in the business environment through the proposed process model, synthesising micro- and macro-solution methodologies and allowing organisations to follow a structured procedure. Two real-world case studies have been used to highlight the value of the data-driven model in management decision-making.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

Keywords

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Article

Nancy Chun Feng, Qianhua (Q.) Ling, Daniel Gordon Neely and Andrea Alston Roberts

Research in nonprofit accounting is steadily increasing as more data is available. In an effort to broaden the awareness of the data sources and ensure the quality of…

Abstract

Research in nonprofit accounting is steadily increasing as more data is available. In an effort to broaden the awareness of the data sources and ensure the quality of nonprofit research, we discuss archival data sources available to nonprofit researchers, data issues, and potential resolutions to those problems. Overall, our paper should raise awareness of data sources in the nonprofit area, increase production, and enhance the quality of nonprofit research.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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Article

Victoria Okojie

The purpose of this paper is to review the different sources of financing university libraries in Africa and the challenges faced by libraries in sourcing for funds, with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the different sources of financing university libraries in Africa and the challenges faced by libraries in sourcing for funds, with a view to suggesting innovative ways through which the library can raise additional funds.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the literature on different sources of financing libraries globally, especially alternative sources of funding outside government grants. It identifies the challenges faced in sourcing for funds, best practices in raising additional funds and makes suggestions on non‐conventional ways that can be used by libraries to address the challenge.

Findings

The paper finds that government provides about 90 per cent of the funds for university libraries in Africa. However, the funding is not only inadequate, but is also usually provided on an ad hoc basis. It notes that, in spite of the fact that the literature reveals that librarians are aware of the danger inherent in depending so much on one source of funding and the need to seek alternative sources, they have not done much to overcome the challenge.

Originality/value

In reviewing the various sources of financing university libraries, the paper notes that government allocation remains the major source of revenue; notes the alternative sources of revenue in different countries and describes some of the best practices available. The paper also updates the literature on the subject by discussing current practices, and makes a case for the establishment of a Business and Public Relations department in libraries, an increase in public‐private partnerships and greater efficiency in managing library resources.

Details

Library Management, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article

Nancy Chun Feng, Daniel Gordon Neely and Lise Anne D. Slatten

The purpose of this paper is to test the association between various stakeholder groups and whether nonprofit organizations (NPOs) have obtained accountability…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the association between various stakeholder groups and whether nonprofit organizations (NPOs) have obtained accountability accreditation. In particular, the study intends to answer the following research questions: Does the governance of an NPO have any impact on the likelihood that the organization obtains certification? Does an NPO’s investment in executives affect certification efforts? Does employing a professional fundraiser play a significant role in whether an organization seeks accreditation? and Are certification efforts influenced by the relative sophistication of donors of the NPO?

Design/methodology/approach

Data were analyzed by examining information provided in the Internal Revenue Service revised Form 990, Part VI specifically from organizations holding the Standards for Excellence® (SFX) certification. This study uses a size- and sector-matched sample of 228 NPOs (half of which with the SFX certification and half without) to examine the association between accountability and governance in NPOs in both univariate and multivariate contexts.

Findings

The findings of this study indicate that organizations with strong internal governance (indicated by their answers to the governance-related questions in Form 990) are more likely to have obtained certification when compared to a group of nonprofits that did not receive the certification. In addition, nonprofits that invest more in their executives are more likely to receive SFX certification. Interestingly, external stakeholders (donors making restricted gifts, and professional fundraisers) are not associated with the likelihood of holding the SFX certification.

Research limitations/implications

Even though the study has attempted to control for factors that may have contributed to the findings (e.g. a size- and sector-matched peer for each NPO that secures the SFX seal in the final sample), it is not feasible to perfectly tease out all alternative explanations for the findings. Endogeneity issues may still be present given that the sample and comparison groups possess significantly different governance characteristics (i.e. governance scores, board independence, investments on executives).

Practical implications

The positive association between organization governance and investment in executives and the NPO’s certification credentials implies that certification may be used by these certified organizations as a signaling mechanism for strong governance. This would be consistent with the positive stakeholders’ reactions to NPOs’ accountability certifications that have been documented by Feng et al. (2016). The findings should help NPO board and staff members, researchers, and regulators to further understand the association between stakeholder groups and whether NPOs have obtained accreditation.

Originality/value

A thorough search of the relevant literature suggests that this study is the first one to link the association between stakeholder influence (proxied by the NPO’s governance strength, investments in executives, employing a professional fundraiser and donor sophistication) and an NPO’s decision to seek accountability accreditation. The findings should provide insights to stakeholders and researchers interested in examining the value of third-party accountability certifications and signaling mechanisms in NPOs and inform regulators regarding significant stakeholder influence on NPOs’ accreditation decision-making process. The results of this study also add to the body of literature on certification programs for NPOs.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

Keywords

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Book part

Gemma Coughlan and Paul Wabike

This chapter presents a case study of a community engagement project that was established in 2013, between the International Business School of Hanze University of Applied…

Abstract

This chapter presents a case study of a community engagement project that was established in 2013, between the International Business School of Hanze University of Applied Sciences (UAS), Groningen, the Netherlands, and various communities within Mombasa County, Kenya. From an educational point of view, this engagement helped enrich the curriculum, in terms of learning how business is conducted in a different cultural setting, and how classroom knowledge can be applied within the field. From a community perspective, this engagement acted as a facilitator to knowledge and resource access. The authors highlight aspects that have explicitly added value to the projects, whilst simultaneously presenting engaging dissonance arising from the implementation of the project as well as discussing factors that could be addressed to improve this type of community engagement. The recommendations would be most applicable to projects within similar cultural settings and/or with a similar geographical distance.

Details

Engaging Dissonance: Developing Mindful Global Citizenship in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-154-4

Keywords

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