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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2020

Emmanuel Kojo Sakyi and Kingsley Senyo Agomor

This paper aims to examine lecturers' experiences of moonlighting in the Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration (GIMPA).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine lecturers' experiences of moonlighting in the Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration (GIMPA).

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was used. Data were collected through in-depth semi-structured interviews with 18 purposively selected informants. Data were transcribed and analyzed thematically.

Findings

The findings are that moonlighting is common at GIMPA, and the institutional environment is conducive for the practice. Knowledge of the practice is unclear. However, moonlighting serves as a source of additional income for lecturers, which a significant majority describe as enabling their continuing employment at GIMPA, but many pointed out the negative effects as well. Lack of a policy to control the behavior has been cited as a reason for the problem, which left lecturers to self-determine what to do. Moonlighting practice is affecting the quality of teaching and support to students by the lecturers.

Research limitations/implications

The sample of the respondents who participated in the study is small and limited to 18. Their views cannot be generalized to all higher education institutions. But, the results show the seriousness of the problem and its implications.

Practical implications

Moonlighting is prevalent in GIMPA. It suggests that employees of other public higher education institutions are no immune to it.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its kind to explore the practice of moonlighting in a quasi-public higher education institution in Ghana. It has added to the empirical literature on the practice and the effects on the institution.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 October 2008

Emmanuel Kojo Sakyi

The purpose of this paper is to examine the barriers to the implementation of management decentralisation of health services and programmes at district level in Ghana.

1320

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the barriers to the implementation of management decentralisation of health services and programmes at district level in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for the study were collected through a qualitative technique in the Sekyere West district.

Findings

The findings are: transfer of authority for management decision making and planning was rarely operational at district level; and control over financial and personnel decisions remained centralised. The paper identified lack of staff capacity, lack of commitment and inter‐organisational conflict between health managers and local government officials as factors obstructing the implementation of management decentralisation in the district.

Originality/value

The lesson from the study is that the implementation of health care management decentralisation at district level has stalled because of the combined effect of internal and external constraints. The paper suggests that given the enormity of the problem of paucity of capacity to undertake new service management responsibilities, the process of transferring responsibilities, resources and control to lower level health managements should be gradual and incremental; the sequencing of reform too should be such that district health officers and stakeholders are given adequate training prior to the inauguration of new management reform.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

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