Search results

1 – 10 of over 221000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Desalegn Abraha and Akmal S. Hyder

In conclusion, the relevance of the research implications, managerial implications, and implications for strategies in emerging markets are assessed in this chapter. The…

Abstract

In conclusion, the relevance of the research implications, managerial implications, and implications for strategies in emerging markets are assessed in this chapter. The findings show that future research should apply different research designs such as a focus group discussion, collect empirical data from the various levels of the chosen organizations, be quantitative, make use of hypothesis testing, do a comparative study, etc. Various managerial implications are also recommended based on the study and the conclusions drawn. Some of the implications are that management should develop a long-term learning and adaptive perspective. Management must be able to secure a full understanding of all the partners on the subject of joint venture, strategic alliances, and other forms of collaboration. Some of the implications for strategies in emerging markets are that the spectrum of competitive strategies developed by Hout et al. (1982), Jobber and Ellis-Chadwick (2013), and Ansoff (1975) is found to be relevant and applicable in emerging markets. The other strategies that deal with emerging markets were also found to be relevant and applicable in the Eastern and Central Europe market with some minor modifications and adaptations. The reader should keep in mind that some articles are referenced repetitively in research implications, managerial implications, and implications for strategies in emerging markets when they are found to be necessary for drawing implications. For the sake of clarity, implication is defined as follows: an implication is something that is suggested, or happens indirectly. It has many different senses: usually used in the plural, implications are effects or consequences that might happen in the future. When you left the gate open and the dog escaped, you are guilty by implication.

Details

Transformation of Strategic Alliances in Emerging Markets, Volume II
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-748-7

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

The Insight Discipline: Crafting New Marketplace Understanding that Makes a Difference
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-733-4

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 3 August 2020

Liam Fahey

Abstract

Details

The Insight Discipline: Crafting New Marketplace Understanding that Makes a Difference
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-733-4

Content available
Article
Publication date: 31 May 2021

Fredrik Tiedemann, Joakim Wikner and Eva Johansson

The purpose of the study is to describe the implications of strategic lead times (SLTs) for return on investment (ROI).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to describe the implications of strategic lead times (SLTs) for return on investment (ROI).

Design/methodology/approach

This study was part of an interactive research project and is based on the logic of theory application leading to theory building. It uses a multiple case study with five holistic single cases. Empirical data (ED) have mainly been collected from interviews and focus groups.

Findings

The length of and uncertainty in SLTs have implications for companies' financial performance. These implications vary in strength and can be either direct or indirect. These findings are incorporated into a framework on SLTs' implications for ROI.

Research limitations/implications

The presented array of SLTs' implications for ROI could be further investigated, focussing on their strength. Additionally, it would be interesting to substantiate the findings in the context of environmental and social sustainability (i.e. the triple bottom line).

Practical implications

The findings offer practitioners a rich description and understanding of SLTs' actual implications for financial performance in terms of ROI. This knowledge can support practitioners in analysing supply chain designs based on financial performance.

Originality/value

Using a combination of a relative financial performance measure (ROI) and a set of SLTs (systems perspective), this study focuses on SLTs' actual implications for ROI. The findings provide evidence that different sections of a supply chain can have different implications for revenue, cost and investment (i.e. the three absolute measures related to ROI).

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 32 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

The Insight Discipline: Crafting New Marketplace Understanding that Makes a Difference
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-733-4

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2020

Oluwayomi Kayode Babatunde

The purpose of this study is to map the implications and competencies for Industry 4.0 to the hard and soft aspects of total quality management (TQM).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to map the implications and competencies for Industry 4.0 to the hard and soft aspects of total quality management (TQM).

Design/methodology/approach

The author/s collected data from purposively drawn samples of early-career engineering professionals (ECEPs) using a cross-sectional survey. A total of 20 ECEPs from three small-class cohorts (2014, 2016 and 2018) participated in the survey. The author/s analyzed data using the Kruskal–Wallis test and Wilcoxon–Mann–Whitney test to establish the effect of cohort and gender on the implications and competencies for Industry 4.0. The author/s then mapped the top- and bottom-ranked implications and competencies onto the hard and soft aspects of TQM using a matrix.

Findings

Based on the cohort, significant differences p < 0.05 existed in the interests and competencies for Industry 4.0. In congruence, the 2014 cohort had the highest number of “unique” top- and bottom-ranked competencies and implications spanning the hard and soft TQM. Based on gender, nonsignificant differences p < 0.05 existed in the interests and competencies for Industry 4.0. The male and female ECEPs' “common” top-ranked implications appeared under the hard and soft TQM. All their “common” top-ranked competencies appeared under the hard TQM, while all their “common” bottom-ranked competencies appeared under the soft TQM.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size, context/discipline and perceptual data are limitations.

Practical implications

Optimizing an existing TQM framework/matrix to design Industry 4.0 TQM, advanced as TQM 4.0.

Originality/value

Perspectives of early-career professionals for TQM 4.0 implementation.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1986

Peter E. Earl

It is argued on the basis of ideas from personal construct psychology that people feel attached, or desire strongly to become attached, to particular consumption pathways…

Abstract

It is argued on the basis of ideas from personal construct psychology that people feel attached, or desire strongly to become attached, to particular consumption pathways because they judge that to do otherwise would carry “implications” of a predominantly negative kind with respect to their abilities to make sense of the complex and uncertain world around them. It is noted that information‐processing problems may make it impossible for consumers to compute the overall implications of alternative strategies when market conditions change. Hence they may use simplifying decision procedures which may conflict with the principle of substitution.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Risto Tapio Salminen, Minna Oinonen and Juha Haimala

The purpose of this paper is to gain knowledge on the character of managerial implications within business-to-business (B2B) marketing, in terms of type of relevance…

Downloads
1699

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain knowledge on the character of managerial implications within business-to-business (B2B) marketing, in terms of type of relevance addressed in research articles on solution business and integrated solutions.

Design/methodology/approach

Use of Jaworski’s framework on role-relevance to classify the type of relevance addressed in 29 journal articles. A systematic literature review on solution business preceded the selection of articles and a concern to include different journal categories.

Findings

Managerial implications in the studied articles within solution business do not seem to emphasize role-relevance particularly; they rather address applicability of findings on a company level and for B2B marketing in a more general sense. The majority of implications for practice are framed to have an impact on “present actions”. Managerial knowledge needs are dominantly addressed by “empirical findings” or “frameworks”. The dominating managerial core tasks addressed are “transformer of marketing” and “marketing strategy”.

Research limitations/implications

There do not seem to be studies with managerial implications addressing future actions and thinking; providing instruments, methods or models that are role- relevant; focusing on the challenges of a “coordinator”, “strategist” or “performance controller”. The focus on solution business limits the generalizability of findings.

Practical implications

Results suggest that implications for practice potentially would benefit from being written in the form of explicit recommendations; targeted to a particular managerial role; and increasingly developed when it comes to proposed frameworks for them to be useful for managers in industrial marketing.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to systematically examine the character of managerial implications by categorizing results in accordance with a framework specifically addressing role-relevance.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 29 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Enrico Baraldi, Antonella La Rocca and Andrea Perna

This article aims to analyze a set of features in the managerial implications of the most-cited business-to-business (B2B) marketing articles which are related to their…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to analyze a set of features in the managerial implications of the most-cited business-to-business (B2B) marketing articles which are related to their managerial relevance. The purpose is to further identify which are the most recurrent features of managerial implications, as well as the connections between such features. Finally, the articles aim to verify if these features of managerial implications vary depending on the scientific impact of the article.

Design/methodology/approach

The 60 most-cited articles were selected from both generalist and specialized academic journals and a content analysis was conducted. Then the article assesses the formal features (e.g. dedicated space), the language (e.g. consulting or normative), the translation of scientific results (e.g. message efficacy) and such other features as time orientation, specificity and abstraction of the managerial implications in these high-impact articles. The article also analyses patterns and associations between the aforementioned dimensions across the 60 articles, also depending on their level of scientific impact (i.e. their number of citations).

Findings

The results point that six out of nine features contributing to managerial relevance are the most frequently present in the implications (dedicated section easy to find, balance between academic and consulting language, partly scientific approach, overlap with scientific findings, message neither too complicated nor too simplistic, and long-term orientation). However, three other features reducing managerial relevance afflict nearly half of the articles: non-normative, generic and abstract implications. The ten articles lacking completely managerial implications are slightly more frequent among highest impact ones, which also often include overly complicated implications; while speculative and overly simplistic implications typically appear more among lowest impact articles which, however, also stand for very specific messages. There seems not to be any statistical correlation between the features contributing to managerial relevance and the scientific impact (number of citations) of an article. Instead, several of these features are correlated among each other, meaning that when one is missing, it is likely that the others also are. Finally, when implications are included in a dedicated section of the article, they tend to be specific and consequently also tend to have the other features favoring relevance.

Originality/value

The article provides an empirically grounded assessment of features that influence the managerial relevance of scientific research in the areas of B2B marketing. Our results are, in fact, grounded in a detailed examination of the managerial implications of 60 high-impact articles in this disciplinary domain.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 29 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Björn S. Ivens and Catherine PARDO

The purpose of this paper is to identify what managerial implications research related to inter-organizational interfaces has been produced in marketing. For this aim, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify what managerial implications research related to inter-organizational interfaces has been produced in marketing. For this aim, the authors focus on a specific concept implemented in many firms that operate on business-to-business markets, which is key account management (KAM).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used the Ebsco Database entering “account management” as a key word in the title row. The search provided 51 papers to which the authors added four MSI reports written by Moriarty and Shapiro between 1980 and 1984. The authors then identified such keywords as “managers”, “practitioners”, “marketers”, “managerial”, “business”, and their variations as well as normative words such as “should”, “must”, etc. in order to identify managerial implications.

Findings

Four main findings are provided: a clear managerial purpose is affirmed by KAM academic works whether as a central “purpose” of the works or as “implications”; these managerial implications may display different forms (dimensions to be considered, consequences to anticipate, advices); though the managerial scope of KAM works is clearly visible, the sophistication of managerial recommendations remains … limited; the identification of who is exactly “the manager” targeted by the implications remains vague.

Research limitations/implications

The authors discuss the notion of managerial relevance of academic research.

Practical/implications

The authors explore sources for practices (whether they are the ones of scholars or managers) that could help “spelling out more effectively the managerial implications.

Originality/value

To the knowledge this is the first work that reviews so precisely how academic articles address to the managerial audience on a precise issue. Furthermore, the authors believe that KAM is an interesting and appropriate field for such a review because it is widely implemented on business markets.

Details

IMP Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-1403

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 221000