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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Ellen R. Trahan, Leslie A. North, Margaret M. Gripshover and Jeanine M. Huss

This paper aims to explore the development narrative and usage of environmental sustainability tours available at universities and takes an in-depth look into the Western Kentucky…

2023

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the development narrative and usage of environmental sustainability tours available at universities and takes an in-depth look into the Western Kentucky University (WKU) Green Tour.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires and interviews were conducted with sustainability leaders involved in tours at their university to discover how they were developed and used. An assessment of the WKU Green Tour used surveys and pre- and post-tests to determine the reach of the tour to the campus population, student learning and faculty use.

Findings

There is a lack of data on sustainability tours, making it difficult to design new tours and validate their status as an essential tool. In the case of WKU, the need for data was confirmed, as current practices that were assumed to be effective proved ineffective. Multiple suggestions for improved tours are provided.

Research limitations/implications

The case study used in this paper is not representative of all university sustainability tours as they can vary widely. Given the lack of research on the subject, especially quantitative research, it is a valuable study.

Practical implications

Though sustainability tours are touted as a valuable tool for all campuses, more data are needed to validate this claim. Data suggest the tours are effective tools for increasing knowledge, but there is need for further assessment of tours and how they can be used to create a sustainably literate campus.

Originality/value

This study is the first to assess sustainability tours using mixed-methods.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 December 2019

Madhurima Deb and Vibhas Amawate

This study aims to gain insight on evaluation of cause-related marketing (CrM) campaigns by the millennial with focus on skepticism, brand identity and patronage intention.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to gain insight on evaluation of cause-related marketing (CrM) campaigns by the millennial with focus on skepticism, brand identity and patronage intention.

Design/methodology/approach

To attain the above objective a conceptual model was developed and tested using structural equation modeling and confirmatory factor analysis.

Findings

The finding suggests that sub-segments exist among millennial segments. They can be classified into hedonic, utilitarian, individualistic and collectivists. Compared to utilitarian and individualistic customers hedonic and collectivists were found to evaluate CrM campaign more favorably. Utilitarian and individualistic depict skepticism toward CrM campaign.

Practical implications

The in-depth knowledge gained about millennials is expected to benefit academicians and marketers alike. Academicians will be enriched by the knowledge of the micro-segments that exists among the millennial and how that had differential impact on their skepticism while evaluating CrM campaign. The marketers involved in the designing and implementation of the CrM campaign will be benefited from the in-depth knowledge of segments with lower and higher levels of skepticism. Such knowledge gained will help them develop more effective CrM campaign.

Originality/value

One of the contributions of the present study is that it extends the existing knowledge about millennials, particularly in the context of CrM campaign evaluation integrating it with other important variables such as skepticism, brand identity and patronage intention.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 April 2022

Brian Hogan and Colin Reid

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of a particular firm’s stakeholder orientation, particularly employee orientation, on corporate communications with stakeholders…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of a particular firm’s stakeholder orientation, particularly employee orientation, on corporate communications with stakeholders concerning financial irregularities.

Design/methodology/approach

This study explores the impact of a particular firm’s stakeholder orientation, particularly employee orientation, on corporate communications with stakeholders concerning financial irregularities. Using a sample of 762 firm restatements, the authors separate their observations by disclosure transparency (high or low transparency of disclosure) and use logit regressions to examine whether companies with stronger employee orientation make more or less transparent restatement disclosures.

Findings

The findings show that higher levels of investment in employee orientation are associated with less transparent restatement disclosures. Further, examining a subsample of restatements in which managers may have greater discretion over how a restatement is disclosed confirms this finding. However, supplemental tests show that increased external monitoring may mitigate these effects.

Practical implications

The findings provide support that other stakeholders, such as shareholders, should weigh the potential pros/cons of management investments in corporate social responsibility (CSR). These concerns are more important now as firms continue to embrace a stakeholder-focused model of management which allocates resources to numerous stakeholder groups.

Originality/value

This paper extends the growing body of research that assesses the impact of CSR on firm outcomes (Kim et al., 2012; Guo et al., 2016; Hmaittane et al., 2019). Further, this paper contributes to the disclosure transparency literature by finding an association between CSR investment levels and the manner in which a firm discloses a restatement.

Details

Review of Accounting and Finance, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-7702

Keywords

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