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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2019

Andriani Kusumawati, Sari Listyorini, Suharyono and Edy Yulianto

This study aims to examine the impact of religiosity on fashion knowledge, consumer-perceived value and patronage intention.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impact of religiosity on fashion knowledge, consumer-perceived value and patronage intention.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applied purposive sampling method. The population size used a minimum number of samples (100) in the WarpPLS analysis. The inferential statistical technique used is structural equation modeling. A tool for analyzing the structural models is the partial least square method.

Findings

Religiosity is a consumer belief in religion, which does not generate fashion knowledge so that high and low religiousness cannot increase or decrease fashion knowledge. Consumer confidence in their religion can increase consumer-perceived value of Muslim fashion products. It causes consumers to behave positively toward future behavioral intentions, that is, the patronage intention. Consumer religiosity is not the cause of patronage intention so that the high or low level of religiousness does not increase or decrease in the willingness of consumers to visit the store (or patronage intention). Fashion knowledge has a positive influence on consumer-perceived value. Consumer knowledge of fashion can increase the patronage of consumer intention toward Muslim fashion products. Fashion knowledge brings the knowledge to consumers in regard to Islamic law that regulates the prohibited and allowed actions, especially in wearing fashion. The high or low level of consumer-perceived value does not provide a cause for increase or decrease in the willingness of consumers to revisit the store (or patronage intention).

Originality/value

With regard to the relationship between religiosity and knowledge, it is found that there are still limited studies and differences in the sectors studied regarding the influence of religiosity and knowledge. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the religiosity variable in influencing consumer-perceived value has not been used in previous studies. Religiosity is associated with consumer-perceived value expressed as originality in this study because the researcher has not found this relationship in the previous studies. Regarding the relationship between religiosity and store patronage intention, it is found that there are still different opinions in the research results on the effect of religiosity and store patronage intention. Concerning the relationship between knowledge and consumer-perceived value, it is found that there are still different opinions in the research results on the effect of knowledge and consumer-perceived value. The authors found no use of the knowledge variable in influencing store patronage intention in previous research studies. Knowledge associated with store patronage intention is expressed as the originality trait in this study because the researcher has not found this relationship in the previous studies. As for the relationship between consumer-perceived value and store patronage intention, it is found that there are still different opinions in the research results of the study regarding the influence of consumer-perceived value and store patronage intention.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

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Article
Publication date: 20 December 2017

Suja R. Nair

There is tremendous growth potential for food and grocery (F&G) retail in an emerging market like India. Bengaluru is the third most populous city of India. With a total…

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2346

Abstract

Purpose

There is tremendous growth potential for food and grocery (F&G) retail in an emerging market like India. Bengaluru is the third most populous city of India. With a total consumption expenditure of Rs 2,020 billion and per capita retail expenditure of Rs 67,289 (in 2015), Bengaluru has emerged as a sought-after retail market with many foreign and national brands opening stores here. The purpose of this paper is to use the sign of causality to determine the relationships between store attributes, satisfaction, patronage intention and lifestyles in F&G retailing in Bengaluru.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimentation framework using causal design was developed to establish relationships between variables: store attributes, satisfaction, patronage intention and lifestyle. A primary survey was conducted using a structured non-disguised questionnaire involving 346 F&G shoppers from Bengaluru. Hayes regression models were adapted and hypothesized relationships between the variables tested using correlation, multiple regression and Hayes regression/path analysis.

Findings

Satisfaction acts as a mediator in the relationship between store attributes and patronage intention. Lifestyle does not act as the moderator in the relationships between store attributes and patronage- intention; and, satisfaction and patronage intention.

Research limitations/implications

In experiments that test for causality a big limitation is lower internal validity in the absence of control mechanisms, unlike laboratory studies. Another limitation is that this study is limited to urban Bengaluru F&G shoppers, variations could occur if the study is extended to include rural shoppers.

Practical implications

With 100 percent foreign direct investment permitted in the F&G category in India, the research outcomes will be useful to all food retailers (prospective and current) interested in this retail market. Moreover, in the existing competitive scenario, understanding of associative influences between store attributes, satisfaction, patronage intention and lifestyle will enable retailers comprehend F&G shoppers retailing behavior. This information can be used for targeted marketing and operational strategies, which will deliver more success in marketing relationship management, building competitive advantage and enhancing marketing efforts profitably.

Originality/value

This paper is a new and original contribution to the existing literature on causal relationships among variables in retail marketing research. It is different from prior studies that analyzed shoppers F&G behavior, in that it extends the understanding of the role of “satisfaction” as a mediator and “lifestyle” not a moderator, when testing the causality of store attributes on patronage intention.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2021

Carolyn Jia’En Lo, Yelena Tsarenko and Dewi Tojib

Corporate scandals involving senior executives plague many businesses. Although customers and noncustomers may be exposed to news of the same scandal, they may appraise…

Abstract

Purpose

Corporate scandals involving senior executives plague many businesses. Although customers and noncustomers may be exposed to news of the same scandal, they may appraise dimensions of the transgression differently, thereby affecting post-scandal patronage intentions. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether and how consumer-firm affiliation affects future patronage intentions by examining nuances in customers’ vs noncustomers’ reactions toward the transgressor’s professional performance and immoral behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Four between-subjects experimental studies were used to test whether performance-relevant and/or immorality-relevant pathways drive customers’ vs noncustomers’ post-scandal patronage intentions. The results were analyzed using analysis of variance, parallel mediation and serial mediation.

Findings

The results demonstrate that performance judgment, and not immorality judgment, drive the relationship between consumer-firm affiliation and post-scandal patronage intentions (Study 1a), regardless of the order of information presented (Study 1b). Customers form more positive performance judgments because they give more weight to performance-related information (Study 2), demonstrating a sequential effect of consumer-firm affiliation on post-scandal patronage intentions only through the performance-relevant, and not immorality-relevant, pathway (Study 3).

Research limitations/implications

This research contributes to the literature on social distance and moral judgments. Future research should examine other deleterious outcomes such as brand sabotage and negative word-of-mouth, as well as potential moderators including repeated transgressions and prevalence of the infraction in other firms.

Practical implications

This research offers important nuances for understanding how performance and immorality judgments differentially operate and affect post-scandal patronage intentions. The findings highlight the strategic value of communicating the leader’s performance (e.g. professional contributions) as a buffer against potential declining patronage.

Originality/value

Offering new insights into the extant literature and lay beliefs which contend that harsh moral judgment reduces patronage intentions, this research uncovers why and how exposure to the same scandal can result in varying moral judgments that subsequently influence patronage intentions. Importantly, this research shows that the performance-relevant pathway can explain why customers have higher post-scandal patronage intentions compared to noncustomers.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Hyun-Joo Lee

The purpose of this paper is to understand the underlying mechanism of how consumer-to-store employee and consumer-to-self-service technology (SST) interaction qualities…

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3435

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the underlying mechanism of how consumer-to-store employee and consumer-to-self-service technology (SST) interaction qualities contribute to consumer retail patronage.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 300 surveys for each type of in-store kiosk were used for the data analysis. The proposed model was analysed using structural equation modelling.

Findings

This study suggests a direct link from SST usage frequency to perception of SST service quality. Also, retail patronage intentions were positively influenced by both interpersonal service quality and SST service quality, and SST usage intentions were positively affected by retail patronage intentions. Lastly, three causal links were shown to be dissimilar between the two types of in-store kiosk: interpersonal service quality-retail patronage intentions, SST service quality-retail patronage intentions, and SST service quality-SST usage intentions. The remaining links were similar for both types of in-store kiosks.

Originality/value

Previous empirical work on this topic has mostly been limited to investigations of service quality of either a human- or a technology-based service option. In contrast, the current study incorporates both interpersonal service quality and SST service quality as critical factors affecting retail patronage intentions and thus provides an important opportunity to advance the understanding of consumer-to-store employee and consumer-to-SST interaction qualities and their contribution to consumer retail patronage.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 43 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Gongjian Kan, Gérard Cliquet and Maria Puelles Gallo

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the cultural influences that country image has on consumers' hypermarket patronage intention in China and Spain.

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1491

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the cultural influences that country image has on consumers' hypermarket patronage intention in China and Spain.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modelling is utilised to examine the competency of the model in explaining both Spanish and Chinese consumers' intention to patronize major hypermarket brands in their own countries.

Findings

This study has tested the applicability of TRA model in both the China case and the Spain case and confirmed the role of national culture in influencing retail patronage behaviour. In Spain, country image has a direct effect on consumers' hypermarket patronage intention while in China this effect is indirect. In deciding on their patronage behaviours, Spanish consumers tend to rely more on the experience attributes of a hypermarket store and are less likely to be affected by subjective norms. In contrast, Chinese consumers have stronger ethnocentric tendencies in hypermarket shopping behaviour than do Spanish consumers.

Research limitations/implications

The coverage and components of the sample are limited. The convergent validity and discriminant validity of country image scale has not been tested thoroughly.

Practical implications

Foreign hypermarket managers in China should attach special importance to enhancing the experience attributes of their stores and realize the important role of subjective norm in affecting consumers' retail patronage behaviour in collectivist cultures. In addition, multinational retailers in China need to forge a sound image of “corporate citizen” in order to diminish the negative impact of consumer ethnocentrism on their operations.

Originality/value

This paper for the first time tests a model developed in western contexts to explain retailer patronage behaviour in an eastern country and examines the cultural differences of country image effects on this behaviour.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 26 February 2019

Dongfeng Liu, Rob Wilson, Daniel Plumley and Xiaofeng Chen

The purpose of this paper is to analyze fans’ perceptions of the corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities of a professional football club, specifically whether or…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze fans’ perceptions of the corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities of a professional football club, specifically whether or not perceived CSR performances are then likely to influence patronage intentions of the fans in relation to the football club.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses the example of a professional football club in China as a case study for data analysis. Based on a sample of 451 home team fans, analysis was conducted through calculation of descriptive statistics, and exploratory factor analysis. Regression analysis was conducted to determine the impact of perceived CSR performance on fans’ patronage intentions.

Findings

The results revealed that factor 3 (“CSR to customer and employee”) and factor 4 (“Community development and youth education”) were significantly predictive of all the three patronage intention variables, i.e. repeat purchase, word-of-mouth and merchandise consumption. In addition, factor 2 (“charity”) would also affect merchandise consumption intention, but have no effect on any other dimensions.

Originality/value

A scale measuring perceived CSR performance in professional football clubs by the fans in the Chinese context has been developed. In addition, the authors have identified that the two main CSR factors that would influence fans’ patronage intentions are: “CSR to the customer and employee” and “community development and youth education.” Thus, if football clubs are to use CSR strategically to leverage spend, then it is these two areas that they should focus on, explicitly in relation to CSR activities. This paper adds value to an area that is currently under-researched in respect of CSR activities in Chinese professional football.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Andrea Le, Kim-Lim Tan, Siew-Siew Yong, Pichsinee Soonsap, Caple Jun Lipa and Hiram Ting

Drawing upon the stimulus–organism–response (S-O-R) model, the purpose of this study is to examine how perceptions of young customers towards the green image of trendy…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing upon the stimulus–organism–response (S-O-R) model, the purpose of this study is to examine how perceptions of young customers towards the green image of trendy coffee cafés affect their environmental and product attitudes, and subsequently their citizenship behaviour as well as intention to re-patronage. The mediating effect of customer citizenship behaviour (CCB) is also assessed.

Design/methodology/approach

The instrument was developed by adapting measurement from the past studies. Using the purposive sampling technique, data were collected online from 207 young customers in Malaysia who frequented the cafés. Partial least squares structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) was used to perform path modelling and mediation analyses.

Findings

The findings show that green image stimulates both customers’ environmental attitude and product attitude. Although product attitude is found to have a dominant effect on CCB, the impact of environmental attitude on CCB and re-patronage intention is worth noting. Moreover, advocacy and tolerance significantly mediate the relationship between product attitude and re-patronage intention.

Originality/value

This study advances the consumer behaviour literature by determining the influence of green image on two forms of attitudes as well as the mediating role of the multi-dimensional CCB between attitudes and intention to re-patronage trendy coffee cafés among young customers. While the findings confirm the importance of product attitude and the relevance of advocacy and tolerance in relation to re-patronage, the study also highlights the growing awareness of green image among young customers and its implications on knowledge and practice.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2021

Atmadeep Mukherjee, Amaradri Mukherjee and Pramod Iyer

Food waste is a big problem where millions of pounds of produce are discarded every year because they are imperfect or unattractive. Despite the societal implications of…

Abstract

Purpose

Food waste is a big problem where millions of pounds of produce are discarded every year because they are imperfect or unattractive. Despite the societal implications of selling unattractive produce, limited research has been directed toward understanding the effect of imperfect produce on consumers’ evaluations of the produce and retailer outcomes. This paper aims to investigate why consumers tend to discard imperfect produce and how retailer interventions (i.e. anthropomorphized signage and packaging) can alleviate these negative effects.

Design/methodology/approach

Three experiments were conducted to examine the postulations. Study 1 highlights the role of consumers’ embarrassment in the purchase decision of imperfect produce and retailer patronage intention. Studies 2 and 3 provide managerially relevant boundary conditions of anthropomorphic signage and opaque packaging.

Findings

Convergent results across three studies (n = 882) indicate that imperfect produce increases purchase embarrassment and reduces purchase intention and retailer patronage intention. Retailer interventions (i.e. anthropomorphic signage and opaque packaging) can allay this feeling of embarrassment and lead to an increased retailer patronage intention and higher service satisfaction.

Practical implications

This research provides guidance to retailers for effectively promoting imperfect produce.

Social implications

Retailers’ actions can benefit the well-being of farmers, suppliers, customers and the overall environment.

Originality/value

This research adds to the literature on unattractive produce by identifying new moderators, namely, anthropomorphic signages and opaque packaging. The research also shows that purchase embarrassment is a key process mechanism.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 35 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2009

Hyun‐Joo Lee, Ann E. Fairhurst and Min‐Young Lee

The purpose of this study is to examine ways in which service quality delivered by self‐service kiosks influences consumers' retail patronage intentions.

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3937

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine ways in which service quality delivered by self‐service kiosks influences consumers' retail patronage intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

The model was tested in two self‐service kiosk settings: self‐checkout and information kiosk. Survey participants were members of a consumer panel from an online survey agent. A total of 1,230 e‐mails were distributed. Of these, 600 usable surveys were used for data analysis. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The study demonstrates that service quality delivered by self‐service kiosks is a direct and an indirect determinant of consumers' retail patronage intentions; service quality delivered by self‐service kiosks directly influences consumers' retail patronage intentions and also indirectly influences consumers' retail patronage intentions through three dimensions of retail service quality (i.e. reliability, personal interaction, and problem solving).

Originality/value

Compared with previous studies that were heavily focused on consumer acceptance or trial of self‐service technologies, the study attempts to address formerly unexplored aspects of self‐service kiosks' contribution to retail patronage. A second contribution of the study which makes it different from prior studies that were mostly conducted in the context of self‐checkouts is that it tests a conceptual model related to two types of self‐service kiosks (i.e. self‐checkout and information kiosk) to examine whether the proposed relationships are similar or dissimilar across the two types.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2018

Sunil Hazari

Using the context of Rio Olympic games, the purpose of this paper is to investigate attitude toward sponsorship outcome as it relates to purchase behavior, gender, sponsor…

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1628

Abstract

Purpose

Using the context of Rio Olympic games, the purpose of this paper is to investigate attitude toward sponsorship outcome as it relates to purchase behavior, gender, sponsor patronage, sports enthusiasm, and social media consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using an online survey of 265 participants. Questions regarding demographics, viewing habits, sports participation, enthusiasm, attitude toward Olympic events were included in the survey. The four sub-scales were sponsorship attitude, sponsor patronage, social media consumption, and sports enthusiasm.

Findings

The findings of the study showed that social media consumption is positively related to attitude toward event and sports patronage. There was a significant gender difference on attitude toward event, social media consumption, and sports enthusiasm. Predictors for making a purchase as a result of seeing a social media advertisement were gender, playing competitive sport, and social media consumption.

Practical implications

This study will add to the body of academic and practitioner research on sponsorship outcomes, and provides an opportunity for marketers to leverage social media networks for sponsorship communication.

Originality/value

As the use of social media networks has increased over the past few years, no previous study has investigated association of sports enthusiasm, gender, or social media consumption toward sponsor patronage which relates to consumers seeking out sponsors and being influenced to make a purchase as a result of marketing communication of sponsors.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

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