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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Ellen Freiberger

Age-related processes are marked by physiological, psychological and social decline, threatening health, quality of life, functional status and the mobility of individuals. As the…

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Abstract

Purpose

Age-related processes are marked by physiological, psychological and social decline, threatening health, quality of life, functional status and the mobility of individuals. As the impact of demographic change also begins to affect persons with intellectual disabilities (ID), issues and needs regarding the aging process are slowly entering the field of ID research. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In the population of older people with ID, important, age-related events such as falls have prompted increasing research. Falls may lead to several negative health outcomes, require that an individual receives higher levels of care sometimes including hospitalisation and, in the worst case, hasten death. Falls also lead to psychological consequences such as fear of falling which fuels a vicious circle in which older persons afraid of falling reduce their physical activity, in turn hastening their functional decline.

Findings

Fall prevention in persons with ID is just evolving and further research is clearly necessary. This research can draw on the existing evidence from other fall prevention areas, especially the work carried out with the general older population.

Originality/value

As stated by Finlayson, a useful next step would be the development of a consensus on the definitions and methodology that should underpin future fall prevention research with persons with ID.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Drones and the Law
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-249-9

Article
Publication date: 7 March 2023

Wilma van der Vlegel-Brouwer, Marjolein van der Vlegel, Jean Ellen Duckworth, Hazel Partington and Anneke de Jong

This quantitative phase of a mixed-methods study aims to describe the effect of the Transitional Care Bridge (TCB) programme on functional decline, mortality, health-care…

Abstract

Purpose

This quantitative phase of a mixed-methods study aims to describe the effect of the Transitional Care Bridge (TCB) programme on functional decline, mortality, health-care utilisation and health outcomes compared to usual care in a regional hospital in the Netherlands.

Design/methodology/approach

In a pre- and post-cohort study, patients aged ≥70 years, admitted to the hospital for ≥48 h and discharged home with an Identification of Seniors at Risk score of ≥2, were included. The TCB programme, started before discharge, encompassed six visits by the community nurse (CN). Data were obtained from the hospital registry and by three questionnaires over a three months period, addressing activities of daily living (ADL), self-rated health, self-rated quality of life and health-care utilisation.

Findings

In total, 100 patients were enrolled in this study, 50 patients in the TCB group and 50 patients in the usual care group. After three months, 36.7% was dependent on ADL in the TCB group compared to 47.1% in the usual care group. Mean number of visits by the CN in the TCB group was 3.8. Although the TCB group had a lower mortality, this study did not find any statistically significant differences in health outcomes and health-care utilisation.

Research limitations/implications

Challenges in the delivery of the programme may have influenced patient outcomes. More research is needed on implementation of evidence-based programmes in smaller research settings. A qualitative phase of the study needs to address these outcomes and explore the perspectives of health professionals and patients on the delivery of the programme.

Originality/value

This study provides valuable information on the transitional care programme in a smaller setting.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 24 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

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