Search results

1 – 10 of over 26000
Open Access
Article
Publication date: 19 September 2017

Chandan Kumar Jha, Vijaya Gupta, Utpal Chattopadhyay and Binilkumar Amarayil Sreeraman

This study aims to evaluate the link between climate/weather change and farmer migration in Bihar, India. The influence of cognitive conditions and climate-related stress…

Downloads
12206

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate the link between climate/weather change and farmer migration in Bihar, India. The influence of cognitive conditions and climate-related stress on farmer migration decisions and the socioeconomic characteristics of migrating and non-migrating farm households are analysed. The focus is the role of migration in access to climate and agricultural extension services and the contribution of migration to enhanced farmer coping capacity.

Design/methodology/approach

A primary survey was conducted of farm households in seven districts of Bihar, India. Farmer perceptions of climate change were analysed using the mental map technique. The role of socioeconomic characteristics in farm household migration was evaluated using binary logistic regression, and the influence of migration on access to climate and agricultural extension services and the adaptive capacity of migrating households was investigated using descriptive statistics.

Findings

Climate-induced livelihood risk factors are one of the major drivers of farmer’s migration. The farmers’ perception on climate change influences migration along with the socioeconomic characteristics. There is a significant difference between migrating and non-migrating farm households in the utilization of instructions, knowledge and technology based climate and agriculture extension services. Benefits from receipt of remittance, knowledge and social networks from the host region enhances migrating households’ adaptive capacity.

Originality/value

This study provides micro-evidence of the contribution of migration to farmer adaptive capacity and access to climate and agricultural extension services, which will benefit analyses of climate-induced migration in other developing countries with higher agricultural dependence. In addition, valuable insights are delivered on policy requirements to reduce farmer vulnerability to climate change.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 11 January 2008

Heidi Rapp Nilsen

The paper's purpose is to highlight conflicting interests between combating climate change and the technique of carbon capture and storage (CCS) within the Norwegian…

Downloads
803

Abstract

Purpose

The paper's purpose is to highlight conflicting interests between combating climate change and the technique of carbon capture and storage (CCS) within the Norwegian petroleum industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is written in a conceptual form. The theoretical starting point is that strong sustainable development is necessary to combat climate change. The practical example is state‐of‐the‐art of CCS, and whether this contributes to combat climate change or not.

Findings

This paper finds using circulation economics adds essential environmental preconditions to the technique of CCS. First, the global environmental gain must not be outnumbered through an increase in production volume. Second, if the technique does not contribute to strong sustainable development then the producers must instead limit the extraction of petroleum.

Research limitations/implications

The figures in this paper build upon the current knowledge within this research area. Extensive research is taking place, and may change the figures. The findings and conclusions of this paper will not be affected though by changes in figures.

Practical implications

The findings of this paper show that it is necessary to use a holistic and global theoretical approach in choosing tools to combat climate change.

Originality/value

The paper uses a relatively new economic theoretical approach to highlight environmental aspects regarding a technique of capturing carbon, which is currently being developed to combat climate change.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 35 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2018

Julia Margarete Puaschunder

Climate control needs have reached momentum. While scientists call for stabilizing climate and regulators structure climate change mitigation and adaptation efforts around…

Abstract

Climate control needs have reached momentum. While scientists call for stabilizing climate and regulators structure climate change mitigation and adaptation efforts around the globe, economists are concerned with finding proper and fair financing mechanisms. In an overlapping-generations framework, Sachs (2014) solves the climate change predicament that seems to pit today’s against future generations. Sachs (2014) proposes that the current generation mitigates climate change financed through bonds to remain financially as well-off as without mitigation while improving environmental well-being of future generations through ensured climate stability. This intergenerational tax-and-transfer policy turns climate change mitigation into a Pareto improving strategy. Sachs’ (2014) discrete model is integrated in contemporary growth and resource theories. The following article analyzes how climate bonds can be phased-in, in a model for a socially optimal solution and a laissez-faire economy. Optimal trajectories are derived partially analytically (e.g., by using the Pontryagin maximum principle to define the optimal equilibrium), partially data driven (e.g., by the use of modern big market data), and partially by using novel cutting-edge methods – for example, nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC), which solves complex dynamic optimization problems with different nonlinearities for infinite and finite decision horizons. NMPC will be programed with terminal condition in order to determine appropriate numeric solutions converging to some optimal equilibria. The analysis tests if the climate change debt adjusted growth model stays within the bounds of a sustainable fiscal policy by employing NMPC, which solves complex dynamic systems with different nonlinearities.

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 23 April 2018

Apurba Roy and Mohammed Ziaul Haider

The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of climate change on economic development in Bangladesh. More specifically, the research aims to figure out the…

Downloads
3501

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of climate change on economic development in Bangladesh. More specifically, the research aims to figure out the influence of climate change on gross domestic product (GDP) growth rate related to different sectors such as agriculture, forest, water, health and infrastructure. It also attempts to explore the effect of climate change on the coastal economy of Bangladesh.

Design/methodology/approach

A set of statistical and econometric techniques, including descriptive and correlation analysis and time series regression model, was applied to address the objective of the research. Sector-wise time series economic data were collected from the World Bank for the period between 1971 and 2013. Climate data were received from the Bangladesh Agricultural Research Council online database for the period between 1948 and 2013.

Findings

The results from the statistical analysis show that climate variables such as temperature and rainfall have changed between 1948 and 2013 in the context of Bangladesh. The econometric regression analysis demonstrates that an increase by 1°C of annual mean temperature leads to a decrease in the GDP growth rate by 0.44 per cent on average, which is statistically significant at the 5 per cent level. On the other hand, the estimated coefficients of agriculture, industry, services, urbanization and export are positively associated with GDP growth rate, and these are statistically significant at the 1 per cent level. Sector-wise correlation analysis provides statistical evidence that climate change is negatively associated with various sectors, such as agriculture, forest, human health and arable land. In contrast, it has a positive relation to water access and electricity consumption. Analysis of coastal regions shows that climate change negatively affects the local economic sectors of the coastal zone of the country.

Originality/value

Although this study has received significant insight from the world-renowned research publication “The Economics of Climate Change: The Stern Review”, there is a dearth of research on the economic impact of climate change in the context of Bangladesh. The findings of the paper provide deep insight into and comprehensive views of policy makers on the impact of climate change on economic growth and various sectors in Bangladesh.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2016

Abstract

Details

Governing for the Future: Designing Democratic Institutions for a Better Tomorrow
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-056-5

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 27 February 2009

Paul E. Hardisty

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how project economics and decision making in industry can be affected by global climate change. When assessing the…

Downloads
1637

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how project economics and decision making in industry can be affected by global climate change. When assessing the sustainability of any design or project, one of the key emerging considerations is the potential for the decision to contribute to greenhouse house gas (GHG) emissions. Changes in climate may also lead to new project risks with further economic implications.

Design/methodology/approach

Examination of the wider social economic implications of climate change provides the basis for considering individual projects within the context of the social costs of carbon emissions, the prospect of the gradual internalisation of those costs, and the costs and benefits of adaptation to protect against the impacts of global change on the project.

Findings

Emissions of greenhouse gases, still widely not priced in many parts of the world, drive the emerging observed and predicted effects of climate change on the planet. This damage has real value and can be monetised, allowing a notional social cost of carbon to be estimated. As climate change continues to manifest itself, societies start to react, constraining emissions and creating a market price or tax for carbon. If economic analysis for project decision making includes an explicit consideration of the likely future trajectory of carbon prices, and also examines the wider external social costs of carbon, the benefits of early adoption of revenue‐positive measures to reduce emissions are revealed. In the same way, the financial costs of procrastination are made increasingly evident as regulatory and economic baselines shift. Designing for inevitable climate change will also help industry future‐proof their operations.

Practical implications

At present, relatively few organisations examine the financial and economic implications of carbon emissions or the effects of a changing climate on their operations. To avoid unnecessary costs, and maximise benefit for stakeholders, decision making for business and government needs to incorporate an explicit economic treatment of the current and likely future implications of operating in a climate‐constrained and climate‐impacted world.

Originality/value

By conducting the kind of analysis proposed, organisations can not only help to reduce GHG emissions, but can also improve their own financial performance. The value of this analysis will only increase over the coming decades of the climatechange era.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 4 November 2013

Md. Abdur Rashid Sarker, Khorshed Alam and Jeff Gow

This paper aims to examine rice farmers' selection of adaptation strategies to cope with and offset the effects of climate change and the determinants of those selections…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine rice farmers' selection of adaptation strategies to cope with and offset the effects of climate change and the determinants of those selections in Rajshahi, a severely drought-prone district of Bangladesh.

Design/methodology/approach

Farm-level micro data were obtained from 550 rice growers in the 2010-2011 farming season. A multinomial logit (MNL) model was utilised to assess the determinants of adaptation strategies practised by farmers in response to climate change.

Findings

Results from the MNL model indicate that gender, age, education of household heads, household assets, annual farm income, farm size, tenure status, farmer-to-farmer extension, access to credit, access to subsidy, and access to electricity, all affect farmers' selection of adaptation strategies for climate change.

Originality/value

This is the first study of its kind to analyse the determinants of adaptation strategies for climate change by farmers in drought-prone areas of Bangladesh. This study provides direction for policy makers in order to strengthen the adaptation strategies of farmers and guide policies accordingly. These strategies have the potential to minimise the adverse effects of climate change.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 26 July 2013

Trung Thanh Nguyen and John Tenhunen

The authors aim to provide here an opinion on the state‐of‐the‐art of integrated ecological‐economic assessments of bioenergy under climate change, as well as the…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors aim to provide here an opinion on the state‐of‐the‐art of integrated ecological‐economic assessments of bioenergy under climate change, as well as the challenges along with their implications faced in planning adaptation at local scale.

Design/methodology/approach

Investments to reduce emissions must be made in the coming decades to avoid the risks posed by climate change. If these investments are made wisely, then costs will be manageable, stability in markets as well as energy security will be achieved, and even rural development and economic growth may be stimulated. The authors call attention to the need for modeling of climate change impacts by combining the outputs from appropriately designed crop simulation models with economic analyses. Combining natural science and economics in a compatible fashion at local scale will play an essential role in advancing communication and information exchange.

Findings

There are key differences in drivers or determinants of mitigation and adaptation potential and decisions at different scales, which means that different actors, different timescales and different spatial scales of decision making must be specifically considered. Understanding of the potential impacts of climate change requires disaggregation of the agricultural sector with appropriate detail. A critical trade‐off exists between area‐wide spatial coverage and an explicit consideration of local peculiarities.

Originality/value

The authors suggest that a much stronger effort must be made to meld natural science crop modeling approaches with economic analyses, to include spatially explicit consideration of conventional crop production along with 1st and 2nd generation bioenergy crops, and the evaluation not only of “best guess” scenarios of change, but also potential system impacts of extreme scenarios.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 8 August 2018

Thi Kieu Van Tran, Ehsan Elahi, Liqin Zhang, Habibullah Magsi, Quang Trung Pham and Tuan Minh Hoang

The purpose of this paper is to estimate a recent trend in climate change and its impact on livelihood of community living in Nam Dinh province, Vietnam. Further, it aims…

Downloads
1679

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to estimate a recent trend in climate change and its impact on livelihood of community living in Nam Dinh province, Vietnam. Further, it aims to increase the government attention for adaptation measures by providing awareness of climate change and its negative impacts on livelihood.

Design/methodology/approach

For study purpose, cross-sectional and secondary data sets were used. The community perceptions about climate change were recorded by face-to-face interviews of 500 respondents from Nam Dinh province, Vietnam in April 2015 by using a well-structured questionnaire, whereas secondary data were collected from the statistical yearbook of General Statistics Office of Vietnam. To accomplish the study objectives, Cobb–Douglas production function and Likert scale were used to estimate the community perceptions of climate change and impact of climate change on livelihood, respectively.

Findings

Results depict that climate change negatively impacted on the productivity of rice and livestock. Particularly, frequently occurring of droughts, floods and salinity intrusion negatively impacted on rice productivity, while livestock productivity is decreased by frequent occurring of flood storms in study area.

Originality/value

The study results suggest a government support is essential to achieve sustainable livelihoods for coastal communities living in the Red River Delta, particularly some adaptation measures in the context of climate change are required in study area.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 24 June 2019

Jo-Ting Huang-Lachmann

Understanding policy consequences for cities is very important in an urban setting, especially in this era of developing solutions for grand challenges. Climate change

Abstract

Purpose

Understanding policy consequences for cities is very important in an urban setting, especially in this era of developing solutions for grand challenges. Climate change adaptation and smart cities are emerging topics in the climate change and sustainability domain. Therefore, this paper aims to achieve a better understanding of policy consequences and exploring synergies of climate change adaptation and smart cities are valuable for both research and practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper systematically reviews synergies of smart city applications in urban climate change adaptation literature. A systematic literature review and content analysis are carried out to answer the research questions and a theoretically based smart cities concept matrix with synergetic coproduction theory is used to assess the empirical studies.

Findings

Key findings are that the model of synergetic coproduction could identify the benefits co-existing in smart city and climate change adaptation. While smart people and smart government play the fundamental roles, synergies could co-occur in other smart city dimensions. Smart city applications in climate change adaptation could increase competitiveness in cities by exploiting the opportunities as well as reducing the harmful risks.

Research limitations/implications

The outcomes of the smart city applications in climate change adaptation aim to contribute to the exploration of developing indicators for smart city studies in climate change.

Practical implications

The findings provide successful examples for city governments and stakeholders to identify the low-hanging fruits as well as win-win adaptations. The results could also serve as the exploration of indicators in the field of smart city in climate change. The smart cities concept with the synergetic coproduction theoretical model could be further developed into a sustainability accounting and reporting methodology for cities to improve their sustainability information management.

Social implications

The successful cases showing benefits could serve as examples for public-private partnerships to develop strategies to exploit opportunities in smart city applications and climate change adaptation. The review results also show that the integrated approach of smart city and climate change adaptation is possible and beneficial – hopefully the city managers and policymakers will continue to apply the integrated approach with smart city and further climate action agenda.

Originality/value

This study combines two emerging topics in the assessment, climate change adaptation and smart cities, and represents a new way of assessing literature and possibly policy outcomes for the cities. By using the theoretical framework from smart cities and theory of coproduction, a theory-based framework is developed for assessing the empirical studies of climate adaptation in cities. The findings from the systematic literature review indicate relations among smart city dimensions in a clear manner and also identify the synergies of smart cities and climate adaptation.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 26000