Search results

1 – 5 of 5
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Dov Zohar

As an epilogue to this special issue, this paper aims to provide a summary and set of conclusions to the papers contained in the issue.

895

Abstract

Purpose

As an epilogue to this special issue, this paper aims to provide a summary and set of conclusions to the papers contained in the issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Reviews the papers and comments about the findings and research implications.

Findings

The study of workaholism has a long way to go yet and there is much to do. There are still problems with shared understandings so much so that even after 25 years convergence has still to be achieved.

Originality/value

Provides a more objective commentary on the papers and stresses the areas that still need research and work.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 January 2011

896

Abstract

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 21 June 2024

Alan R. Dennis

I adapt the Integrated Model of Workplace Safety (Christian et al., 2009) to information security and highlight the need to understand additional factors that influence security…

Abstract

Purpose

I adapt the Integrated Model of Workplace Safety (Christian et al., 2009) to information security and highlight the need to understand additional factors that influence security compliance and additional security outcomes that need to be studied (i.e. security participation).

Research limitations/implications

This model argues that distal factors in four major categories (employee characteristics, job characteristics, workgroup characteristics and organizational characteristics) influence two proximal factors (security motivation and security knowledge) and the security event itself, which together influence two important outcomes (security compliance and security participation).

Practical implications

Safety is a systems design issue, not an employee compliance issue. When employees make poor safety decisions, it is not the employee who is at fault; instead, the system is at fault because it induced the employee to make a poor decision and enabled the decision to have negative consequences.

Social implications

Security compliance is as much a workgroup issue as an individual issue.

Originality/value

I believe that by reframing information security from a compliance issue to a systems design issue, we can dramatically improve security.

Details

Organizational Cybersecurity Journal: Practice, Process and People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2635-0270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2020

Deepak MD and Gangadhar Mahesh

Safety in construction projects is essential and requires more attention towards minimizing the accident rate. Problems concerning awareness of safety risks, procedures and…

Abstract

Purpose

Safety in construction projects is essential and requires more attention towards minimizing the accident rate. Problems concerning awareness of safety risks, procedures and practices still exist in the industry, which indicate a shortfall in diffusion of safety-related knowledge in construction industry. Also, there is dearth of studies on knowledge management strategies to prevent reoccurrence of accidents and thereby improve safety culture in construction industry. This study attempts to unveil aspects of knowledge management that are ignored in considering safety culture and discern the differences in the perception of key stakeholders of construction industry. Therefore, the objective of this study is to identify and measure knowledge-based safety culture elements.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the focus is on the application of a reliable, valid and sensitive knowledge-based safety culture assessment tool on key stakeholders operational in construction industry. Research method adopted is a questionnaire-based survey to seek responses from industry professionals. A total of 199 responses were obtained from 106 different companies operational in Indian construction industry. Statistical analyses including ranking analysis, t-test, correlation analysis, and ANOVA test are utilized for comparing and identifying the differences in view of stakeholder's perceptions concerning workplace safety.

Findings

This study helps to identify and rank critical knowledge-based safety culture elements from the perspective of key stakeholders of construction industry. This contributes in identifying the most critical and neglected variables among the key stakeholders regarding aspects of safety culture. Also, the study shows the importance of knowledge dimension in developing overall safety culture in construction industry.

Originality/value

Results of this study offer valuable insight in enabling key stakeholders of construction industry to examine and enhance their safety performance. The implications of this study contribute new knowledge in assessing conditions that will improve worker safety in the construction industry. The paper should be of interest to researchers and practitioners in the area of occupational health and safety management.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2021

Prince Ewudzie Quansah, Yongyue Zhu and Anthony Frank Obeng

This paper aims to investigate the effect of mining supervisor behaviour, safety motivation and perceived job insecurity on Ghanaian underground miner’s safety citizenship…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the effect of mining supervisor behaviour, safety motivation and perceived job insecurity on Ghanaian underground miner’s safety citizenship behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors proposed a conceptual framework that tested supervisor behaviour as an independent variable, safety motivation as a mediator variable, perceived job insecurity as a moderator variable and safety citizenship behaviour as a dependent variable. The authors tested the hypothesized relationships using 351 valid responses collected through a structured questionnaire using hierarchical regression analysis.

Findings

Results revealed that both components of supervisor behaviour significantly influenced safety motivation and safety citizenship behaviour. Furthermore, safety motivation could mediate the relationships between both components of supervisor behaviour and safety citizenship behaviour. Also, perceived job insecurity failed to moderate the relationship between safety motivation and safety citizenship behaviour.

Originality/value

This current study is vital for managerial practices. The complex conceptual framework also contributes to offering different ways of understanding how supervisors’ behaviours can catalyze improvement or worsen safety outcomes.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

1 – 5 of 5