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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Donna Ellen Frederick

For those immersed in the environment of academic and research libraries, the word “data” seems to be everywhere. One hears about linked data, big data, open data, proprietary…

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Abstract

Purpose

For those immersed in the environment of academic and research libraries, the word “data” seems to be everywhere. One hears about linked data, big data, open data, proprietary data, research data, metadata, geospatial data, data repositories, etc.

Design/methodology/approach

Some libraries even have data librarians and data services departments.

Findings

The author of this column wonders if she were to collect all of the library and information science literature published in the past three years and plug it into a word cloud app, which of the two, i.e. “data” or “books”, would be displayed in a larger font.

Originality/value

The author suspects that the chances are more than good that “data” would come out on top.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 33 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Donna Ellen Frederick

In 2016, the “Data Deluge Column” explored the sometimes frustrating reality of cataloguing and metadata librarians as their discipline underwent change.

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Abstract

Purpose

In 2016, the “Data Deluge Column” explored the sometimes frustrating reality of cataloguing and metadata librarians as their discipline underwent change.

Design/methodology/approach

The column, called “Metadata specialists in transition: from MARC cataloguing to linked data and BIBFRAME”, alluded to the ongoing and significant changes in the practice of cataloguing and metadata creation, but did not delve into the nature of the changes and what they mean for libraries in general.

Findings

This instalment of the “Data Deluge Column” expands that discussion by exploring the emerging model for the data that libraries create and manage.

Originality/value

It seems that it has taken about 20 years to overcome the inertia required to begin to reinvent the practice of and environment for creating library data. Perhaps, some of this inertia is because of predictions of the current distress and pressure felt by cataloguing departments today.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 34 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 35 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Donna Ellen Frederick

The purpose of this column is to explore the relationship between the increasing presence of computers and communication technologies during the twentieth and twenty-first…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this column is to explore the relationship between the increasing presence of computers and communication technologies during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries on the changed perception of the level of personal time available to individuals.

Design/methodology/approach

In recent years, there is considerable writing in research journals and the popular media around a cluster of time-related issues which is sometimes referred to “the time crunch”, “time poverty”, “time famine”, “overwork”, “time scarcity” and countless other similar phrases.

Findings

A predominant contemporary struggle is that we seem to lack the time. We cannot seem to do everything we should and want to do.

Originality/value

The issue of time poverty is likely to remain with us in both our professional and personal lives. The question “where did the time go?” has been growing in importance since the mid-twentieth century, and it appears reasonable that even if some of the other causes of time poverty such as gender and class inequality, lack of new experiences in later life and cultural tolerance of obsessive attitudes toward work were to be miraculously reversed, the growing persistence and invasiveness of technology in our lives are not likely something that will diminish.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 July 2018

Donna Ellen Frederick

The emoji, is it an endearing image to add to your text messages and email, or is it an increasingly important type of electronic data? According to a 2013 article by Jeff…

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Abstract

Purpose

The emoji, is it an endearing image to add to your text messages and email, or is it an increasingly important type of electronic data? According to a 2013 article by Jeff Blagdon, the idea of using some sort of symbol in electronic communication has been with us for about two decades. Japanese in origin, the earliest symbols of this type were developed in the era of pagers and old-style cell phones and were commonly called emoticons.

Design/methodology/approach

As devices developed a greater capacity to display graphical elements these keystroke representations were replaced with Unicode characters which display on our electronic devices, which we now call emoji. This instalment of the data deluge will look at the emoji as a form of data and explore how and why their ubiquity may create new opportunities for libraries.

Findings

Some readers, as well as the author of this column, may be tempted to scoff at the idea that the emoji is anything more than a form of shorthand for use in electronic communications or cutesy decorations.

Originality/value

One night she showed up at the class, and the instructor wrote on the board, “Computers in school libraries: A new tool or a flash in the pan?” He went on to warn school librarians to not be dazed by this “new computer phase” which he felt distracted both teachers and students from the real work of teaching and learning. He felt that if there were computers in schools, they only belonged in the mathematics classroom and that, even in that context, they only had limited application.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Content available

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2021

Donna Ellen Frederick and Donna Ellen Frederick

The purpose of this paper is to discuss whether preprint servers are a disruptive technology for science, librarians or information seeking among the general population.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss whether preprint servers are a disruptive technology for science, librarians or information seeking among the general population.

Design/methodology/approach

This column explores what preprint servers are, how they are used in the world of science, how their usage changed in response to the deluge of COVID-19 related research papers and how they might impact the work of librarians and society in general.

Findings

Preprint servers are not a highly disruptive technology, but they do challenge both scientists and librarians to understand them better, use the information they find on them with care and educate society in general on topics such as peer review and the importance of using well-vetted, good quality science in making important decisions.

Originality/value

Up until the past year and a half, only a small segment of the librarian profession needed to be concerned with preprint servers. With the increasing presence of references to non-peer-reviewed articles from preprint servers in popular media reports, most librarians now need to know something about this technology. It is also useful to consider how the technology might benefit and create challenges for their work.

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 36 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Donna Ellen Frederick

The World Economic Forum held in Davos, Switzerland, in January 2016, brought together leaders from the areas of science and technology, business, health, education, government…

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Abstract

Purpose

The World Economic Forum held in Davos, Switzerland, in January 2016, brought together leaders from the areas of science and technology, business, health, education, government and other fields as well as representatives from the media. A key theme of the forum was what has come to be known as the “fourth industrial revolution”.

Design/methodology/approach

News reports and blog posts about the forum gave the impression that this new “revolution” would bring unprecedented advances in science and medicine as well as would hold the potential for a future dominated by intelligent robots and massive levels of unemployment.

Findings

For example, on January 24, 2016, Elliot of The Guardian reported that the “Fourth Industrial Revolution brings promise and peril for humanity”. Sensational headlines and sound bites are good at attracting attention but they are not very effective with regard to communicating what this revolution is about and what it could mean for our lives, communities, governments and our workplaces in the near and distant future. The snippets of information reported here and there give the impression that robots, artificial intelligence, cloud-based computing, big data and a combination of other technologies are gradually merging to create a new reality which has the potential for revolutionizing our way of life.

Originality/value

This installment of the Data Deluge consists of an exploration of the fourth industrial revolution, what role libraries might play in this revolution and how our information environment could be forever changed.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

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