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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2015

Duncan Hodge

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the empirical relationships between changes in OECD output, commodity prices, the real exchange rate, real money supply, unit…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the empirical relationships between changes in OECD output, commodity prices, the real exchange rate, real money supply, unit labour costs and manufacturing in South Africa. In particular, to test a version of the Dutch disease argument that increases in the prices of South Africa’s main commodity exports have had a negative effect on domestic manufacturing against the alternative hypothesis that there is a positive relationship between such changes in commodity prices and domestic manufacturing output.

Design/methodology/approach

Construction of a model including real manufacturing output in South Africa as the dependent variable and the following independent variables: OECD output, an international real metals price index, a real effective exchange rate index, real M3 money supply and manufacturing unit labour costs. The time series sample data comprise 124 quarterly observations for the period 1980-2010. The model equation was tested and estimated using a Johansen cointegration approach.

Findings

The main findings are: OECD output is the single most important determinant of domestic manufacturing output; while the real exchange rate has the predicted negative sign, rising commodity prices are associated with increases rather than decreases in domestic manufacturing and; large increases in unit labour costs since the early 1980s have dragged down manufacturing over the sample period.

Originality/value

The finding of a positive relationship between commodity prices and domestic manufacturing means that the Dutch disease argument must be revised when applied to South Africa. While rising commodity prices may lead to a negative exchange rate effect on manufacturing competitiveness, this is more than offset by the positive growth effects associated with upswings in the commodity price cycle.

Details

African Journal of Economic and Management Studies, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-0705

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 11 August 2020

Chukwuebuka Bernard Azolibe

This study empirically assessed the influence of foreign direct investment on the manufacturing sector growth in the Middle East and North African region using panel data…

2277

Abstract

Purpose

This study empirically assessed the influence of foreign direct investment on the manufacturing sector growth in the Middle East and North African region using panel data of 18 countries covering the period of 1975–2017.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed Levin et al. (2002) test (LLC) and Im et al. (2003) panel unit root test. Furthermore, Kao’s cointegration test was applied to examine the long-run relationship between the variables. Both the Dynamic OLS and Fully modified OLS were used in estimating the short-run relationship.

Findings

The results of the DOLS and FMOLS indicate that both inward and outward FDI influence the manufacturing sector growth positively. This shows that much of the manufacturing sector growth in the MENA region is driven by both inward and outward FDI. Our findings made a strong new proposition that aside from the negative influence proposed by Stevens and Lipsey (1992), outward FDI could also have a positive influence on the manufacturing sector of a country through effective utilization of domestic raw materials that are produced locally for production of goods in a foreign country.

Practical implications

MENA countries should concentrate more on making policies that will encourage the effective utilization of domestic resources for outward foreign direct investment in other countries of the world as it has the capacity to boost the manufacturing sector growth. Also, policies that will attract more inflows of FDI in the region should be encouraged. Both inward and outward FDI should be considered as an integral part of MENA economic policy in order to spur the manufacturing sector growth.

Originality/value

Previous empirical studies on the relationship between FDI and manufacturing sector growth have focused much on the influence of inward FDI. Thus, very little attention has been paid to the contribution that the outward FDI makes to the growth of the manufacturing sector of the host country. Our empirical study focused on the influence of both inward and outward FDI on the manufacturing sector growth with specific emphasis on the MENA region that remains the center of attraction of inward FDI and a source of inward FDI to most nonoil producing developing and developed countries given the oil-rich nature of the region.

Details

International Trade, Politics and Development, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2586-3932

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

George K. Chako

Briefly reviews previous literature by the author before presenting an original 12 step system integration protocol designed to ensure the success of companies or…

6177

Abstract

Briefly reviews previous literature by the author before presenting an original 12 step system integration protocol designed to ensure the success of companies or countries in their efforts to develop and market new products. Looks at the issues from different strategic levels such as corporate, international, military and economic. Presents 31 case studies, including the success of Japan in microchips to the failure of Xerox to sell its invention of the Alto personal computer 3 years before Apple: from the success in DNA and Superconductor research to the success of Sunbeam in inventing and marketing food processors: and from the daring invention and production of atomic energy for survival to the successes of sewing machine inventor Howe in co‐operating on patents to compete in markets. Includes 306 questions and answers in order to qualify concepts introduced.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 12 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 June 2020

Paul Adjei Kwakwa and Frank Adusah-Poku

Carbon dioxide emission is one of the key causes of global warming and climate change. This study investigates the effects of domestic credit and manufacturing indicators…

Abstract

Purpose

Carbon dioxide emission is one of the key causes of global warming and climate change. This study investigates the effects of domestic credit and manufacturing indicators on the emission of carbon dioxide in South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper relied on time series data from 1975 to 2014 and employed regression and variance decomposition methods to analyze the data.

Findings

In the long run, manufacturing output increases total carbon emissions and emissions from solid fuel; manufactures trade reduces carbon emissions and domestic credit reduces emissions from the manufacturing industries and construction. The long-run effect of the changing technical characteristics of the manufacturing sector is sensitive to the estimation technique used. In the short run, however, changing technical characteristics of the manufacturing sector affect the level of carbon emissions. Income increases emissions from manufacturing industries and construction and urbanization increases total carbon emissions.

Research limitations/implications

Policymakers have to initiate effective policies to promote energy-efficient technologies among manufacturing firms.

Originality/value

The paper examines the effect of manufacturing on carbon dioxide emissions in South Africa. It also examines the possible effect of manufactures trade on carbon emissions. Moreover, the possible effect of the changing characteristics of the manufacturing sector on carbon emissions is investigated.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1996

Rajah Rasiah

Structural economists have been amongst the foremost proponents of a pro‐active industrial policy as the mechanism for promoting rapid economic growth (Lewis, 1956;…

1231

Abstract

Structural economists have been amongst the foremost proponents of a pro‐active industrial policy as the mechanism for promoting rapid economic growth (Lewis, 1956; Myrdal, 1957; Kaldor, 1967; Thirlwall, 1989). This is substantiated by the argument that manufacturing being characterised by increasingly specialised inter‐related activities, radiates tremendous impulses both intra and inter sectorally (Young, 1928: 527–42). Using a sample of 12 developed countries, Kaldor (1967:3–23; 1975:891–6; 1979; 1989:282–310) attempted an empirical study to support this relationship. A positive correlation between manufacturing growth and that of the economy has been defended on the grounds that manufacturing growth increases static (relate to size and scale of production units and are characteristic largely of manufacturing where in the process of doubling the linear dimensions of equipment, the surface increases by the square and the volume by the cube), as well as dynamic (relate to increasing returns brought about by ‘induced’ technical progress, learning by doing, external economies in production, etc.) returns (Thirlwall, 1989: 60). Since manufacturing also produces capital goods that are used in different industrial branches and other sectors, it is seen as a powerful mechanism for transmitting technical change (Weiss, 1988). It is for these reasons, structuralists generally prescribe government policies that favour manufacturing expansion. Malaysia is a good example of a natural resource rich country that has made manufacturing its main plank of economic growth especially since the launching of the New Economic Policy (NEP) in 1971 (see Malaysia, 1976). However, as industrial policy in each socio‐political space offers state‐specific characteristics, we will analyse industrialisation within Malaysia's setting.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Yue Zhang, Jiang Yu and Yanmei Liu

The purpose of this paper is to explain how institutional elements and market conditions shape and then reshape the development of high‐tech industries in large emerging countries.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain how institutional elements and market conditions shape and then reshape the development of high‐tech industries in large emerging countries.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper develops a new framework to assess the impact of market and institutions on the high‐tech industry evolution in large emerging economies such as China. The qualitative approach based on historical data and interviews are provided to support the framework.

Findings

The framework and empirical research suggest that the institution systems and market dynamics will interact and influence the transformation process of industrial structure and the strategic choice of partnership arrangement between the domestic and foreign firms. The complementary assets which are considered as proxy to the resource accessibility in the market are also identified in the framework and it was verified in the case study.

Practical implications

This study has important implications for business strategy in emerging economies. The authors' observations indicate building close ties with domestic firms is an important asset to minimize the liability of foreignness for multinational firms. The paper has alluded to co‐evolutionary dynamics in the development of high‐tech industry in China by linking market initiative with institutional environment.

Originality/value

First, the study contributes to institutional‐based view of business strategy by explaining the choice of strategic partnerships between indigenous and foreign players arising from institutional and market considerations. Second, the study extends our understanding of technological catch up in newly‐industrializing countries by showing the interrelation between market elements and institutional arrangements and the corresponding changes to meet technological development needs.

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Kedibonye Sekakela

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of trading with China on Botswana’s domestic and third markets. The paper also assesses the structure and magnitude of…

3251

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of trading with China on Botswana’s domestic and third markets. The paper also assesses the structure and magnitude of Botswana–China bilateral trade.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper used descriptive statistics such as graphic analysis to describe and summarize the basic features of the data. To reach conclusions that extend beyond the immediate data alone, the study applied Chenery Decomposition Approach and also applied the extension of Constant Market Share (CMS) analysis.

Findings

Botswana mainly exports primary products to China and imports intermediate and capital goods, which are mainly used as inputs in the development of infrastructure in the country. Increased imports from China into Botswana’s domestic market has mainly replaced imports from other countries, and China’s textile, clothing and footwear (TCF) exports gained market share from Botswana’s TCF exports in the third markets, i.e. South Africa. Unlike Lesotho, the loss of market share by Botswana’s TCF exports in the South African market increased over the period under study. The Botswana Government needs to consider ways of enhancing Botswana’s TCF export competitiveness and learn lessons from China in relation to enhancing productivity in the TCF and other exporting industries.

Research limitations/implications

Because of lack of data, this paper failed to estimate the impact of import penetration in the manufacturing subsectors and analyze the rapidly growing Botswana–China bilateral trade in services. There has been no estimate of the impact of intermediate and capital goods on production costs of Botswana’s productive sectors. Lastly, because of lack of data, there have been no estimates of Botswana’s consumer surplus generated from consuming relatively low-priced goods from China.

Originality/value

This is the first study to carry out an empirical analysis of the Botswana–China trade relation. The study will be of value to academia and to policymakers who are interested in studying the China–Africa relation.

Details

Journal of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-4408

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 February 2021

Effnu Subiyanto

This study aims to shed light on defining precisely variables of logistics costs model in Indonesia’s cement projects and generally other projects scientifically. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to shed light on defining precisely variables of logistics costs model in Indonesia’s cement projects and generally other projects scientifically. The variables have previously so far been identified based on pragmatism and practical experience without rigorous scientific and empirical findings. The models are deeply awaited by every project practitioner, especially project controllers, in Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for the period 2010–2018 of eight cement projects were taken in quarterly and tested with a statistical tool EVIEWS10 to develop a robust proposed model. Investigating models were done by literature studies and empirical studies, and the results had been examined by statistical tests to be determined as robust or not-robust models. The certain period taken due to the availability data of the cement projects in which after 2018 was unavailable because the cement product is overcapacity in Indonesia.

Findings

The model proposed is resulted by synthesizing logistics literature and empirical from the cement projects in which the model consists of foreign logistics costs, domestic manufacture, and domestic logistics costs as the best findings to develop logistics model for the cement projects with a-10 independent variable. It significantly found the variable of foreign logistics costs have taken higher portions in the model, and therefore must be prior carefully anticipated.

Practical implications

To guide investors to alert with several important variables of logistics in Indonesia. As education that to invest in Indonesia, the best logistics model must prior be known to anticipate further uncertainty.

Originality/value

This study is advanced applied research of logistics models developed by author for future possibility implementation in the sector beyond cement projects.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 May 2022

Abhijeet Bag, Sarbapriya Ray and Mihir Kumar Pal

In India, economic reforms adopted in 1991 in form of LPG (Liberalization-Privatization-Globalization) removed numerous barriers to grow and offered opportunities to…

Abstract

In India, economic reforms adopted in 1991 in form of LPG (Liberalization-Privatization-Globalization) removed numerous barriers to grow and offered opportunities to improve productivity, particularly, for the manufacturing sector. But the rationale that manufacturing sector acted as main contributor to country's economic growth via GDP growth (called “engine of growth”) for a long time in India has been challenged now a day. The growing significance of the services sector across the world exhibits that at the present time, the services sector could become the new engine of economic growth in developing economies like India. The present study seeks to bring to light whether manufacturing is acting as an “engine of growth” at inter-state level in India or not and the cross section result indicates that potency of manufacturing growth and agricultural growth is gradually slowing down as a conforming part of economic growth and service sector is taking leading position in accelerating engine of growth in India.

Details

Globalization, Income Distribution and Sustainable Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-870-9

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

1462

Abstract

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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