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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Indiresh Anand, Avril Smith, Kelly-Jo Charge and Christos Kouimtsidis

The purpose of this paper was to evaluate and improve the quality of the aftercare services we provide for alcohol dependence. This presentation discusses the patient…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to evaluate and improve the quality of the aftercare services we provide for alcohol dependence. This presentation discusses the patient satisfaction of the Relapse Prevention Group.

Design/methodology/approach

This was a prospective service users' satisfaction survey of those who attended the relapse prevention group programme at the Community Drug and Alcohol Team for the first 11 months of programme implementation.

Findings

In all, 33 out of 36 people participated in the evaluation. The overall results were positive for the whole programme and people felt that the programme helped them in their recovery.

Originality/value

Monitoring of service users’ satisfaction with aftercare services could provide insight into the barriers compromising engagement.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2004

Raduan Che Rose, Jegak Uli, Mohani Abdul and Kim Looi Ng

While much is known generally about predictions of customer‐perceived service quality, their application to health services is rarer. No attempt has been made to examine…

Abstract

While much is known generally about predictions of customer‐perceived service quality, their application to health services is rarer. No attempt has been made to examine the impact of social support and patient education on overall service quality perception. Together with six quality dimensions identified from the literature, this study seeks to provide a more holistic comprehension of hospital service quality prediction. Although 79 percent of variation is explained, other than technical quality the impact of the remaining factors on quality perception is far from constant, and socio‐economic variables further complicate unpredictability. Contrary to established beliefs, the cost factor was found to be insignificant. Hence, to manage service quality effectively, the test lies in how well healthcare providers know the customers they serve. It is not only crucial in a globalized environment, where trans‐national patient mobility is increasingly the norm, but also within homogeneous societies that appear to converge culturally.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2016

Birton J. Cowden, Jintong Tang and Josh Bendickson

A large body of research has exhibited the positive effect of entrepreneurial orientation (EO) on firm performance. However, research that attempts to explore what happens…

Abstract

A large body of research has exhibited the positive effect of entrepreneurial orientation (EO) on firm performance. However, research that attempts to explore what happens to high EO firms when they mature is sorely needed. Every firm establishes a heritage over time that impacts future capabilities. In the current research, we build on the international business literature to examine how a firmʼs administrative heritage moderates the long-term effects of the EO-performance relationship, examined through the firmʼs asset specificity, founder tenure, and home culture embeddedness. From this, implications are derived for EO retention and the firmʼs awareness of administrative heritage and how to shape it to their advantage.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Kimball E. Bullington and Stanley F. Bullington

The need for long‐term relationships between customer and supplier has been suggested for some time. The literature of supply chain management often compares…

Abstract

Purpose

The need for long‐term relationships between customer and supplier has been suggested for some time. The literature of supply chain management often compares customer‐supplier relationships to a marriage. The purpose of this paper is to apply results of research on successful families to supply chain management in order to improve these critical business relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The family strengths research is based on surveys and interviews of more than 6,000 successful families over a period exceeding 20 years, and has been summarized in six characteristics of successful families, which are used as the basis of a model of a successful supply chain relationship. The proposed model for successful supply chain relationships is then compared with the existing literature that addresses relationship success and failure.

Findings

Support for the characteristics in the supply chain relationships model was found in the literature. One weakness of the model was the failure to explicitly emphasize supplier performance.

Originality/value

The characteristics of principles‐centered relationships and the need for appreciation were new contributions. Generally, this aspect is not emphasized in the supply chain management literature. The supply chain relationships model provides a conceptual framework that should be useful in communicating the desired final state.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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